Thursday, May 11, 2017

Facebook dreams of better network connectivity platforms – Part 2

Preamble

Facebook has a stated goal of reducing the cost of network connectivity by an order of magnitude. To achieve this its labs are playing with millimetre wave wireless, free-space optics and drones in the stratosphere.

Project Aquila takes flight

At this year's F8 conference, Facebook gave an update on the Aquila drone aircraft, which is being assembled in California's Mojave Desert. The Aquila project is cool - pretty much everything about this initiative, from its name to its sleek design, has an aura about it that says 'this is cool', who wouldn't want to be developing a solar-powered drone with the wingspan of a Boeing 737. Using millimetre wave technology onboard Aquila, Facebook has achieved data transmission speeds of up to 36 Gbit/s over a 13 km distance; and using free-space optical links from the aircraft has achieved speeds of 80 Gbit/s over 13 km.

Several media sources reported a technical set-back last year (rumours of a cracked frame) but those are in the past or perhaps not relevant any more. At F8, Facebook said Aquila has progressed and is now ready for field testing. However, here again, one element that seems to be missing is the business case. Just where is this aircraft going to fly and who will pay for it?

As described by Facebook, Aquila will serve regions of the planet with poor or no Internet access. Apparently, this would not include the oceans and seas, nor the polar regions, where such an aircraft might have to hover for months or years before serving even one customer. Satellites already cover much of our planet’s surface and for extremely remote locations this is likely to remain the only option for Internet access. New generations of satellites, include medium earth orbit (MEO) constellations, are coming with improved latency and throughput. So Facebook's Aquila must aim to be better than the satellites.

The aircraft is designed to soar and circle at altitudes up 90,000 feet during the day, slowly descending to 60,000 by the end of the night. The backhaul presumably will be a free-space laser to a ground station below. At such a height, Aquila would be above the weather and above the jet stream. During the day, with an unobscured view of the sun, it would recharge the batteries needed to keep flying at night.

Apart from satellites, the alternative architecture for serving such regions would be conventional base stations mounted on tall masts and connected via fibre, microwave or satellite links. Many vendors are already offering solar-powered versions of these base stations, and there are plenty of case studies of how they have been used successfully in part of Africa, and the advantages over a high-flying drone are obvious: mature technology, fixed towers and known costs, no possibility of dangerous or embarrassing crashes.

One could imagine that the Facebook approach might bring new Internet access possibilities to areas such as the Sahara, the Atacama, over islands in the Indonesian archipelago. But is not clear if Aquila’s onboard radios would be powerful enough to penetrate dense forests, such as in the Amazon or Congo. So, if the best deployment scenario is a desert or island with some humans but insufficient Internet access, why is satellite service not a viable option? The likely answer again is economics. Perhaps the populations living in these regions simply have not had the money to purchase enough smartphones or laptops to make it worthwhile for a carrier to bring service.

A further consideration worth noting is that it may be difficult for an American company to secure permission to have a fleet of drone aircraft circling permanently over a sovereign nation. Intuitively, many people would not feel comfortable with a U.S. drone circling overhead, even if it were delivering faster social media.

Designing a communications platform for emergency deployments

Facebook's connectivity lab is also interested in disaster preparedness. At the F8 keynote, it unveiled Tether-tenna, a helicopter-drone that carries a base station and is connected via fibre and a cable with high-voltage power to a mooring station. The system is designed for rapid deployment after a natural disaster and could provide mobile communications over a wide area. But is it a complex technology that provides minimal benefits (certainly not an order of magnitude) over existing solutions?

The closest equivalent in the real world is the cellular-on-wheels (COWs) segment, which is now commonly used by most mobile operators for extending or amplifying their coverage during special events such as outdoor concerts and football matches. A typical COW is really just a base station mounted on a truck or trailer. After being hauled to the desired location, the units can be put into operation in a matter of minutes, using on-board batteries, diesel generators or attachment to the electrical grid. The units often have telescoping masts that extend 4-5 metres in height.

In comparison to a COW, Facebook's Tether-tenna heli-drone will have a height advantage, perhaps 100 metres over the competitors, enabling it to extend coverage over a greater range. However, the downsides are quite apparent too. Base station weight restrictions on the heli-drone, which also must carry the weight of the tether, will be more limiting than on a mast, and this means that the Tether-tenna will not provide the density of coverage possible via a COW, thereby limiting its potential use cases.

In addition, a crashing heli-drone could do a lot of damage to people or property on the ground, and wind would be a major factor, as would lightning strikes. There is also the possibility of collisions with other drones, airplanes or birds. Therefore ensuring safety might require a human operator to be present when the drone is flying, and insurance costs inevitably would be higher than any of the many varieties of COWs that are already in service.

AT&T has a more elegant name for this gear, preferring to call them Cells on Light Trucks (COLTs). During the recent Coachella 2017 music festival in California, AT&T deployed four COLTs equipped with high-capacity drum set antennae, which offer 30x the capacity of a traditional, single-beam antenna. AT&T reported that the COLTs were instrumental in handling the 40 Tbit/s of data that traversed its network during the multi-day event - the equivalent of 113 million selfies. Data traffic from Coachella was up 37% over last year, according to AT&T. Would a heli-drone make sense for a week-long event such as this?  Probably not, but it's still a cool concept.

All of this raises the question: is a potential business case even considered before a development project gets funded at Facebook?

In conclusion, Facebook is a young company with a big ambition to connect the unconnected. Company execs talk about a ten-year plan to advance its technologies, so they have the time and money to play with multiple approaches that could make a difference. A business case for these three projects may not be apparent now but they could evolve into something serendipitously.

Calix and Radisys Partner on Residential CORD

Radisys and Calix announced the delivery of an end-to-end cloud edge solution based on commercially available systems and software that is compliant with the Residential Central Office Re-architected as a Datacenter (R-CORD) architecture, designed to enable SDN, NFV and the cloud model in the access network.

The integrated turnkey access solution for R-CORD combines the CORD open software and hardware building blocks with Radisys' OCP-based DCEngine platform and the carrier-grade Calix AXOS E9-2 Intelligent Edge System, featuring the recently announced AXOS OFx Connector with the open source vOLT-HA integration software and 10 Gbit/s PON converged fibre access (NG-PON2 and XGS-PON).

Deployment of the converged cloud edge solution into the last mile network is intended to allow service providers to accelerate new service introduction while also maintaining quality of experience for subscribers.

The company's noted that the shift to a subscriber-driven network, combined with device proliferation and bandwidth intensive applications, is driving changes in access network design. In this environment, open software-controlled infrastructure can enable service providers to increase agility and reduce costs, as well as speed new service introduction.

It was noted that trials of the R-CORD solution running on the Radisys OCP-based DCEngine hyperscale platform, integrated with Calix's AXOS E9-2 edge system are underway with multiple Tier-one service providers.

For the field trials, Calix is providing the physical optical termination system, with the Radisys DCEngine 16U integrated rack, based on the OCP-compliant CG-OpenRack-19 specification, providing the multi-rack level network functions virtualisation (NFVi) and container-based infrastructure for hosting thousands of virtualised network functions (VNFs) and applications under open software-defined networking control.

Regarding the joint solution, Shane Eleniak, VP of systems products at Calix, said, "The Calix/Radisys R-CORD POD takes advantage of the flexibility and modular architecture of the AXOS E9-2 Intelligent Edge System, AXOS OFx Connector and vOLT-HA integration software… the combination of Radisys' CORD expertise and the componentised architecture, native NetConf/Yang interfaces and anySDN flexibility of the AXOS platform has delivered the first commercially available R-CORD POD solution, bringing the promise of SDN into the access network".


M-CORD Innovations: Transforming Central Offices for 5G


M-CORD takes the best ideas from the pivotal Central Office Re-architected as a Datacenter (CORD) and adapts them for next generation mobile networks. CORD combines NFV, SDN, and the elasticity of commodity clouds and M-CORD adds the latest innovations in mobility, including for the radio access network (RAN), core, and services. This video, hosted by Joseph Sulistyo, Senior Director of Open Networking Solutions at Radisys, provides a broad overview...


Coriant trials disaggregated 100/150/200G with Telefónica Germany

Coriant completed a network trial with Telefónica Germany that featured disaggregated 100, 150 and 200 Gbit/s transmission over live fibre links in the existing 10 Gbit/s DWDM dispersion compensated network.

The recently completed trial with Telefonica Germany involved the Coriant Groove G30 network disaggregation platform and demonstrated the ability to cost-efficiently increase the performance of deployed optical infrastructure using advanced disaggregated optical transmission and open networking capabilities.

The alien wavelength trial was implemented over three separate live links in Telefónica's existing 10 Gbit/s DWDM transmission network spanning distances of 1,070 km, 630 km and 290 km, with connectivity to key network sites including Düsseldorf and Frankfurt.

Supporting interoperability with Telefónica's existing 10 Gbit/s optical line system, the Coriant Groove solution achieved disaggregated 100 Gbit/s transport across all three links, 150 Gbit/s over the 630 km and 290 km links, and 200 Gbit/s capacity over the 290 km connection.

Coriant stated that following the successful trial, in mid-2017 it plans to work with Telefónica Germany to conduct further alien wavelength testing on the operator's 100 Gbit/s national backbone network in Germany utilising the disaggregated Coriant Groove G30 muxponder solution.




  • In 2015, Telefónica Germany deployed the Coriant 8600 Smart Router Series and 8000 Intelligent Network Manager (INM) to upgrade its mobile backhaul network and support the integration of the O2 and E-Plus network infrastructures.

Cisco to Acquire MindMeld for AI Expertise

Cisco agreed to acquire MindMeld, a start-up based in San Franciso that is developing a conversational platform based on natural language understanding (NLU). The deal was valued at $125 million in cash and assumed equity awards. The acquisition is expected to close in Cisco's fourth quarter of fiscal year 2017.

The MindMeld platform can be used for building intelligent conversational interfaces for companies to interact with their customers across almost any device or application. MindMeld is able to ingest customer data and create a highly accurate and customized natural language model, tailored to each company’s industry and requirements. MindMeld also delivers a dialog manager that enables a computer to respond to user requests through chat and voice applications in a human-like fashion.

MindMeld was founded in 2011 by Tim Tuttle, a former AI researcher from MIT and Bell Labs,

http://www.mindmeld.com

ADTRAN demos ITU G.fast 212 MHz and coordinated DTA

ADTRAN has announced that it is conducting what is believed to be the first public demonstration of the ITU-T's two most recent G.fast advances, specifically 212 MHz and coordinated dynamic time allocation (cDTA), at the G.fast Summit 2017 in Paris.

ADTRAN noted that the latest G.fast advances are intended to enable the delivery of symmetric gigabit services over a single copper pair, mitigating the need to bond multiple pairs of copper wire and allowing service providers to extend business-class gigabit services over the existing wiring.

At the G.fast Summit ADTRAN is demonstrating its new 212 MHz G.fast standard, which doubles the usable spectrum and enables the delivery of gigabit rates over a single copper pair and offering an alternative to the use of fibre. ADTRAN has also extended its reverse power feature set to the new solution, simplifying sourcing of local power.

Together, the new capabilities are claimed to enable service providers to accelerate gigabit and ultra-fast broadband service deployments by an estimated 12 to 18 months and reduce costs by up to one third per subscriber. The technology is also intended to offer a competitive alternative to DOCSIS 3.1.

ADTRAN noted that it first demonstrated DTA over coax technology at G.fast Summit 2016, with cDTA the second generation technology. The cDTA function can improve G.fast upstream performance by a factor of four- to five-fold by dynamically balancing upstream and downstream performance to match residential traffic patterns in real-time. Unlike DTA, cDTA extends the applications of the feature to existing phone wiring in residential and commercial premises.

Designed to form a key part of the ADTRAN MOSAIC Open Software Defined Access platform, operators adopting the new solutions can ensure that the G.fast access elements in their network are prepared for the transition to SDN in the future.


Aqua Comms appoints Chief Networks Officer and CFO

Aqua Comms DAC, operator of Ireland's first dedicated subsea optical network that interconnects New York, Dublin and London, has announced the appointment of two new members to its leadership team, namely Andy Hudson as Chief Networks Officer and Kevin Foley as Chief Financial Officer.

Andy Hudson

Aqua Comms' new Chief Networks Officer, Andy Hudson, is a telecoms industry veteran with extensive experience in managing mobile, fixed and subsea operations. Most recently, he served as COO of the Bermuda Telephone Company, a subsidiary of Digicel, where he had operational responsibility for network planning and engineering, service delivery, maintenance, and data centre and facility management.

Kevin Foley

Mr. Foley, the company's new Chief Financial Officer, has wide experience in the telecom industry, including in board level and executive leadership roles with companies in the carrier, interconnect, Internet, mobile, voice and TV sectors.

Before joining Aqua Comms, Kevin Foley served as CFO with Cable & Wireless Barbados (Flow), a Liberty Global company. He was also a board member of Cable & Wireless Communications Insurance and served in C-level positions at Cable & Wireless including CFO, Cayman Islands, and finance director of carrier services.

Aqua Comms noted that the additions to its leadership team follow a period of growth since the launch of the America-Europe Connect (AEConnect) trans-Atlantic cable system in January 2016. The company recently conducted tests of new transmission technologies designed to expand the systems total available capacity.

In addition, Aqua Comms is developing CeltixConnect-2, a diverse subsea cable system across the Irish Sea from Dublin to Manchester, with connectivity to the Isle of Man. CeltixConnect-2 is a resilient system designed to complement its existing CeltixConnect-1 cable. The new cable system will use advanced technology to support high transmission capabilities, including 8QAM and 16QAM. The company stated that survey work for CeltixConnect-2 is due to start in the next quarter.

Aqua Comms stated that it is also in the preliminary stages of development of North Sea Connect, which will provide a high capacity subsea link across the North Sea from the north east UK to Denmark. Additionally, Aqua Comms plans to expand connectivity to AEConnect at its PoP at 1025Connect in Westbury, New York, and to increase its footprint via new service capabilities in Ashburn, Virginia and at NJFX, a carrier-neutral colocation facility in Wall, New Jersey.

Versa Networks expands its SD-WAN Offering

Versa Networks announced a significant expansion of its software-defined networking (SDN) capabilities from SD-WAN to software-defined branch (SD-Branch).

The Versa Cloud IP Platform now enables large enterprises and service providers to virtualise and software-define the branch and WAN to help reduce complexity and increase IT agility.

Versa has enhanced the capabilities of the Versa Cloud IP Platform to enable customers to software-define a range of IP services across the branch office and WAN, including:

1.         The ability to host third-party virtual network functions (VNFs), allowing migration to SD-WAN while simplifying lifecycle management and maintaining existing functions at the branch.

2.         Integrated WiFi and Ethernet switching software support to help simplify infrastructure and management.

3.         Embedded LTE for streamlined and more resilient deployments.

4.         Multi-vector malware security.

For enterprise applications, Versa Cloud IP Platform combines network and security capabilities to provide a suite of Layer 3 to 7 IP services that are based on a cloud-native, multi-tenant software platform. The ability to host third-party VNFs with service chaining facilitates deployment where enterprises wish to maintain functionality provided by other vendors.

In addition, managed service providers can employ the Versa Cloud platform to offer a portfolio of managed services that combine MPLS, broadband Internet and mobile (3G/4G) network services with a Software-Defined Branch (SD-Branch), SD-WAN, Software-Defined Security (SD-Security) or Software-Defined Router (SD-Router).

Datos IO raises investment from Cisco and NetApp

Datos IO, a start-up developing application-centric data management technology for cloud environments, announced that Cisco Investments and NetApp have become strategic investors in the company.

Datos IO stated that it plans to use the proceeds of this investment to develop its application-centric technology that is designed to provide customers with enhanced backup storage efficiency and enable data management services at a granular level. The solution allows enterprises to protect and move traditional and third platform applications, whether on-premise, between public clouds or in multi-cloud environments.

The company noted that as enterprises transition to operating IT across multi-cloud infrastructure and deploying applications in private, public or hybrid cloud environments, it aims to simplify the protection and management of data across clouds while eliminating the complexity of multi-cloud environments for use cases such as backup and recovery, test/dev, cloud on-ramping, archival and analytics.

Datos IO was co-founded in 2014 by Tarun Thakur, CEO and Prasenjit Sarkar, CTO to develop a cloud-first, application-centric approach to data management for both traditional and third platform applications deployed on-premises or on multi-cloud infrastructure. As part of its solution, the company has created a range of technologies using its advanced CODR architecture: Datos IO raised $12.5 million in Series A funding in September 2015.

Datos IO stated that while traditional data protection solutions protect applications at a VM-level or a storage LUN-level, its technology eliminates dependencies on VM or LUN constructs, so enabling application-centric data management. This approach allows enhanced backup storage efficiency, data management services at a granular level and enables customers to intelligently move their applications in public cloud or multi cloud environments.

The company noted that one year after the release of its flagship RecoverX product, it has announced customers including Ayla Networks, Barracuda Networks and Fortune 500 enterprise customers.

Datos is based in San Jose, California.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Time to Register for IEEE Women in Engineering Leadership Conference



We often have the skills to be makers of innovative products, to teach or inspire our kids, but often we have trouble getting started.

In this video, Natalia Baklitskaya, CAD Infrastructure Software Engineer at Intel's Programmable Solutions Group, talks about her upcoming workshop at the the IEEE Women in Engineering Leadership Conference, which will be held May 22-23, 2017 at the San Jose Convention Center.

Join your industry colleagues and reserve your spot, register here: http://bit.ly/2r3v8RU

Can't attend the full 2017 WIE ILC event? Register to attend Tuesday s Career Fair or Networking Reception Monday evening here: http://bit.ly/2qmOOTP


Google Cloud Platform launches No. Virginia region

Google Cloud Platform (GCP) activated its latest cloud region: Northern Virginia (us-east4). The region has three zones (data centers) and now supports GCP compute, Big Data, storage and networking cloud services.

With this addition, Google now has four regions serving the Americas market including Oregon, Iowa and South Carolina. Future regions are planned in São Paulo, Montreal and California.

https://cloudplatform.googleblog.com/2017/05/Google-Cloud-Platform-launches-Northern-Virginia-region.html


Facebook dreams of better network connectivity platforms – Part 1


Facebook's decision to launch the Open Compute Project (OCP) six years ago was a good one. At the time, Facebook was in the process of opening its first data centre, having previously leased space in various third party colocation facilities. As it constructed this first facility in Prineville, Oregon the company realised that it was going to have to build faster, cheaper and smarter if this strategy were to succeed, and that to keep up with its phenomenal growth it would have to open massive data centres in multiple locations.

In 2016, Facebook kicked off the Telecom Infra Project (TIP) with a mission to take the principles of the Open Compute Project (OCP) model and apply them to software systems and components involved in access, backhaul and core networks. The first TIP design ideas look solid and have quickly gained industry support. Among these is Voyager, a 'white box' transponder and routing platform based on Open Packet DWDM. This open line system will include Yang software data models of each component in the system and an open northbound software interface (such as NETCONF or Thrift) to the control plane software, essentially allowing multiple applications to run on top of the open software layer. The DWDM transponder hardware includes DSP ASICs and complex optoelectronic components, and thus accounts for much of the cost of the system.

The hardware design leverages technologies implemented in Wedge 100, Facebook's top-of-rack switch, including the same Broadcom Tomahawk switching ASIC. It also uses the DSP ASIC and optics module (AC400) from Acacia Communications for the DWDM line side with their open development environment. Several carriers and data centre operators have already begun testing Voyager platforms from multiple vendors.

In November 2016, Facebook outline its next TIP plans including Open Packet DWDM for metro and long-haul optical transport networks. This idea is intended to enable a clean separation of software and hardware based on open specifications. Again, there is early support for a platform with real world possibilities, either within Facebook's global infrastructure or as an open source specification that is ultimately adopted by others.

What's cooking at Facebook's network connectivity labs

At its recent F8 Developer’s conference in San Jose, Facebook highlighted several other telecom-related R&D projects out of its network connectivity lab that seem to be more whimsical fancy than down-to-earth practicality. In the big picture, these applied research projects could be game-changers in the race to the billions of people worldwide currently without Internet access, or potential Facebook users of the future. Facebook said its goal here is to bring down the cost of connectivity by an 'order of magnitude', a pretty high bar considering the pace of improvement already seen in mobile networking technologies.

This article will focus on three projects mentioned at this year's F8 keynote, namely: Terragraph, a 60 GHz multi-node wireless system for dense urban areas that uses radios based on the WiGig standard; Aquila, a solar-powered drone for Internet delivery from the stratosphere; and Tether-tenna, a sort of helicopter drone with a base station. It is not clear if these three projects will eventually become part of the TIP of even if they will progress beyond lab trials.

Terragraph

Terragraph is Facebook's multi-node wireless system for delivering high-speed Internet connectivity to dense urban areas and capable of delivering gigabit speed to mobile handsets. The scheme, first announced at last year's F8 conference, calls for IPv6-only Terragraph nodes to be placed at 200-metre intervals. Terragraph will incorporate commercial off-the-shelf components and aim for high-volume, low-cost production. Facebook noted that up to 7 GHz of bandwidth is available in the unlicensed 60 GHz band in many countries, while U.S. regulators are considering expanding this to a total of 14 GHz. Terragraph will also leverage an SDN-like cloud compute controller and a new modular routing protocol that Facebook has optimised for fast route convergence and failure detection. The architecture also tweaks the MAC layer to solve shortcomings of TCP/IP over a wireless link. The company says the TDMA-TDD MAC layers delivers up to 6x improvement in network efficiency while being more predictable than the existing WiFi/WiGig standard.

At the 2017 F8 conference, Facebook talked about how Terragraph is being tested in downtown San Jose, California, a convenient location given that is right next door for Facebook. Weather will not be a significant factor since San Jose does not experience the rolling summer fog of nearby San Francisco, nor does it suffer torrential tropical downpours, whiteout blizzard conditions, scorching summer heat, or Beijing-style air pollution that could obscure line-of-sight.

While the trial location might be ideal, one should also consider in which cities would Terragraph be practical. First, there are plenty of WiFi hotspots throughout San Jose and smartphone penetration is pretty much universal and nearly everyone has 4G service. Heavy data users have the option on unlimited plans from the major carriers. So maybe San Jose only serves as the technical trial and the business case is more applicable to Mexico City or Manaus, Lagos, Nairobi, or other such dense urban areas.

At the F8 conference, Facebook showed an AI system being used to optimise small cell placement from a 3D map of the city centre. The 3D map included data for the heights of buildings, trees and other obstacles. The company said this AI system alone could be a game changer simply by eliminating the many hours of human engineering that would be needed to scope out good locations for small cells. However, the real world is more complicated. Just because the software identifies a particular light pole as an ideal femtocell placement does not mean that the city will approve it. There are also factors such as neighbour objections, pole ownership, electrical connections, etc., that will stop the process from being fully automated. If this Terragraph system is aimed at second or third tier cities in developing countries, there is also the issue of chaotic development all around. In the shanty towns surrounding these big conurbations, legal niceties such as property boundaries and rights-of-way can be quite murky. Terragraph could be quite useful in bringing low-cost Internet into these areas, but it probably does not need fancy AI to optimise each small cell placement.

Generally speaking, 3G and now 4G services have arrived in most cities worldwide. The presumption is that Facebook is not seeking to become its own mobile carrier in developing countries but that it would partner with existing operators to augment their networks. Meanwhile one suspects that the reason carriers have been slow to upgrade capacity is certain neighbourhoods or cities is more economic than technical. It is probably not a lack of spectrum that is holding them back, nor a lack of viable femtocell products or microwave backlinks, but simply a lack of financial capital or a weak return on investment, or red tape. One reason for this that is often cited is that over-the-top services, such as Facebook, suck all the value out of the network, leaving the mobile operator with very thin margins and little customer stickiness.


Part 2 of this article we will look at Facebook's Aquila and Tether-tenna concepts.

Verizon expands universal CPE portfolio with whitebox, OpenStack

Verizon announced it has expanded its Virtual Network Services offering with the addition of x86-based whitebox options leveraging OpenStack to its universal customer premises equipment (uCPE) portfolio.

Verizon's uCPE offering means that enterprises do not need to invest in separate, dedicated hardware appliances to deliver key virtual network functions (VNFs) such as software-defined WAN (SD-WAN), security, routing, WAN optimisation, or any network function that can be virtualised.

Verizon is seeking to simplify the transition to software-defined, application-centric network deployments for organisations of any size by expanding its Virtual Network Services uCPE options from vendor-specific platforms to an open hardware, open source whitebox architecture.

Verizon's uCPE portfolio targets applications ranging from solutions suitable for small retail sites up to large data centre deployments and leverages commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and a globally distributed open source architecture. This allows enterprises to rapidly deploy services globally using Verizon's application library.

The uCPE solution features service chaining and enterprise orchestration functionality that enables automated onboarding and provisioning, with future orchestration releases to offer service assurance capabilities for fault and performance monitoring, closed-loop healing and a VNF factory. The enhanced life-cycle orchestration capabilities are designed to enable enterprises to implement near real-time SDN technologies.


Verizon noted that the combination of COTS hardware and a distributed deployment of OpenStack allows customers to decouple hardware from software and removes the need for proprietary hardware. This capability can help customers to reduce costs and simplify the physical network architecture, as well as allowing them to choose the most suitable hardware and applications for their individual requirements.


Telefónica Picks Nuage Networks for SD-WAN

The Telefonica Group has selected Nuage Networks, a division of Nokia, as its provider for next-generation Software Defined Wide Area Network (SD-WAN) services. The installation will deliver automated end-to-end services leveraging next-generation cloud technology to several thousand global enterprise customers using Nuage Networks Virtualized Network Services (VNS). Financial terms were not disclosed.

The companies said the new SD-WAN service from Telefonica is expected to be available in second half of 2017 in Spain, and will be followed by Telefonica Business Services (International) and other subsidiaries. Telefonica is integrating the Nuage Networks SD-WAN solution with new full-stack approach across the Group and will develop a superb customized self portal for user-driven service customization and fulfillment, which will accelerate deployment and bring individual sites online while reducing operational overhead at the customer site.

"The IT, communications and service demands of today's enterprises are much higher than just a few years ago. Companies require new cloud technologies to support them while simplifying traditional service models. We worked closely with Telefonica to ensure the Nuage Networks' VNS solution addresses their new SD-WAN service requirements around the globe. Enterprise customers who need more flexibility and agility to adapt to rapidly changing business needs can get it through a trusted provider like Telefonica," stated Sunil Khandekar, founder and chief executive officer of Nuage Networks from Nokia.

http://www.nuagenetworks.com



SDN Market Update: Sunil Khandekar, Nuage Networks



What is resonating in the market today for software-defined networking (SDN) and SD-WAN technologies? Sunil Khandekar, founder and CEO of Nuage Networks, says it is the ability to connect users everywhere with applications anywhere, whether they are in public or private clouds. Real deployments are becoming the new normal.

See video: https://youtu.be/-lPYVzja530


NEC begins construction of 3 subsea cables in Micronesia

NEC, in partnership with Belau Submarine Cable (BSCC) and the government of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), announced it has commenced construction of three submarine cable links that will connect the islands of Palau, Yap and Chuuk in the western Pacific Ocean to the global network.

BSCC, supported by a loan from the Asian Development Bank (ADB), has signed a supply contract with NEC to build the spur to Palau, while FSM, backed by a grant from the World Bank (WB), has signed a supply contract with NEC to construct the spur to Yap, and recently signed an additional agreement for the extension from Pohnpei to Chuuk.

The spurs to Palau and Yap will both interconnect with the SEA-US cable system, also under construction by NEC, which connects the Philippines and Indonesia to the west coast of the U.S. via Guam and Hawaii. In addition, the extension from Pohnpei, the capital of FSM, to Chuuk branches out of another existing cable linking FSM, the Marshall Islands and Guam. All three routes feature transmission speeds of 100 Gbit/s per channel.

BSCC is a state-owned entity of the Republic of Palau with responsibility for the submarine cable project. BSCC has signed an IRU agreement with GTI (a subsidiary of Globe Telecom) for the provision of 5 x 100 Gbit/s wavelengths and a branching unit (BU) on the SEA-US West subsystem linking Indonesia, the Philippines and Guam. It has also contracted NEC to supply a spur cable linking the BU on the SEA-US West subsystem to Palau.

On completion of the project, BSCC will provide open bandwidth access to the international cable system for domestic telcos.

In addition, DTCI has signed an IRU agreement with Telkom Indonesia (Telin) for 5 x 100 Gbit/s wavelengths and a BU on the main trunk of the SEA-US West subsystem, plus a supply contract with NEC to deliver a spur cable linking the BU on the SEA-US West subsystem to Yap, along with a contract extension that includes a cable linking Weno Island Chuuk to the existing spur on to the HANTRU-1 cable system in Pohnpei to Guam.

Ownership and implementation responsibilities for the cable systems will pass from DTCI to the newly established FSM Telecommunications Cable (FSMTCC) which, as owner of the Yap and Chuuk cable systems, will provide open bandwidth access to the international cable systems for domestic telcos.


Ericsson introduces Dynamic Orchestration for physical/virtual networks

Ericsson has launched its Dynamic Orchestration solution, designed to facilitate the introduction and closed-loop automation of services across physical and virtual networks, as part of the company's strategy to enable IT transformation for its customers.

Ericsson Dynamic Orchestration offers a flexible and modular solution for the management of existing technologies, while also enabling the provision and control virtualisation capabilities.

Delivering support for zero-touch automation, rapid provisioning and policy-driven service assurance, Ericson's Dynamic Orchestration, which is being showcased at TM Forum Live! in Nice, can help operators achieve faster time to market and enhance their ability to deliver new and differentiated services.

Ericsson noted that leveraging advances in IT networking and driven by the evolution towards 5G and IoT, services are becoming more cloud-based. This means that service providers need to be able to both deliver services on demand and respond to changing requirements in real time, necessitating faster provisioning and the enforcement and monitoring of SLAs.

A key element within the Ericsson Digital Support Systems portfolio, the new Dynamic Orchestration offering is designed to provide operators with the tools needed to transition to software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualisation (NFV). The solution integrates software with professional services and automates multiple layers to enable the creation, delivery and assurance of digital services such as software defined WAN (SD-WAN), VPN and 5G network slicing.


Dynamic Orchestration is an end-to-end, automated service orchestration solution that supports validation of virtual network functions (VNFs), design and onboarding of new services, inventory, resource and capacity management, service configuration management and service assurance.

Microsemi and Aquantia introduce multi-rate Ethernet switch reference platform

Semiconductor solutions provider Microsemi and Aquantia, a supplier of high-speed Ethernet connectivity solutions for data centres, enterprise infrastructure and client connectivity, introduced a production-ready multi-rate switch reference platform optimised to support 24 x 2.5 Gbit/s and up to an additional four 2.5/5/10 Gbit/s BASE-T ports.

The solution, which is available immediately, combines Microsemi's SparX-IV Layer 2/3 enterprise switch, VSC7448, Linux SMBStaX software, clock management, PD69208M Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) power sourcing equipment (PSE) manager, and Aquantia's second generation multi-rate IEEE 802.3bz PHY, the AQR409.

Designed for applications including 1, 2.5 and 10 Gigabit Ethernet switching and aggregation, the joint reference design from Microsemi and Aquantia is suitable for enterprise infrastructure applications such as switches, access routers and WLAN access point (AP) switches.

Microsemi's VSC7448 SparX-IV-80 device is an 80 Gbit/s SMB/SME industrial Ethernet switch offering up to 52 ports supporting 1, 2.5 and 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports. Utilising multi-stage versatile content aware processing (VCAP), the solution delivers VLAN and QoS processing to enable the delivery of differentiated services, security via intelligent frame processing and egress frame manipulation. For industrial applications, VSC7448 integrates VeriTime timing technology.

The device also features a 500 MHz CPU that enables management of a Layer 2/3 Ethernet switch solution, and an API and software development package to aid development for managed Ethernet applications.

In addition, the PD69208M PoE PSE manager is designed to support IEEE 802.3bt for data rates up to 10 Gbit/s, while Microsemi clock management portfolio provides low jitter devices for clock synthesis, frequency conversion, jitter attenuation and fan out buffers.

Aquantia's AQrate AQR409 is an advanced low power, three-speed, quad-port PHY housed in a 19 x 19 mm flip-chip BGA package. AQrate technology is designed to bridge the bandwidth gap between legacy cabling infrastructure designed for 1 Gbit/s data rates and new 802.11ac WLAN technology offering higher bandwidth. The AQR409 can support 2.5/1 Gbit/s and 100 Mbit/s line rate over 100 metres of Cat 5e or Cat 6 cabling.

AQrate PHYs are compatible with the NBASE-T Alliance PHY specification and IEEE 802.3bz standard and perform physical layer functions required for transmission over 100 metres of twisted pair cabling. They also offer support for the IEEE 802.1AE MAC-layer security (MACsec) protocol and IEEE 1588 v2 PTP to synchronise real-time clocks to sub-microsecond accuracy,

Microsemi noted that the collaboration with Aquantia is part of its Accelerate Ecosystem, designed to speed time to market for end customers and development time for ecosystem participants.


Kaiam expands UK manufacturing capacity via acquisition of facilities from CP

Kaiam, a privately-held developer of hybrid photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology, announced the completion of its acquisition of the manufacturing facilities of Compound Photonics (CP) in Newton Aycliffe, Durham in the UK as part of a transaction that also includes investment by CP into Kaiam to further develop the facility.

The Newton Aycliffe facility will enable Kaiam to significantly increase its manufacturing capacity for silica-on-silicon planar lightwave circuits (PLCs) and 40 and 100 Gbit/s transceivers, and adds both electronic and optoelectronic compound semiconductor devices to the product line. The acquisition also includes tooling and an experienced team that complements and expands Kaiam's existing Livingston, Scotland factory.

Kaiam noted that the new facility will enable it to produce InP photonic integrated circuits (PICs) that will form the basis for advanced transceivers in the future. The transaction continues Kaiam's strategy of achieving vertical integration, building on its acquisition of Gemfire's PLC fab in 2013.

The Newton Aycliffe facility encompasses 300,000 sq feet and includes a fully operational wafer fab with 100,000 sq feet. of cleanroom space for processing, packaging, and testing of III-V devices. The factory is currently shipping GaAs devices and circuits, with the capability to produce InP optoelectronics. Kaiam noted that the facility was originally built as a silicon fab for DRAMs before being converted to III-V materials and currently has 3 and 6 inch lines.
Kaiam announced in March that it planned to acquire the manufacturing facilities of Compound Photonics (CP) in Newton Aycliffe. Kaiam acquired Gemfire, its strategic PLC supplier, in 2013 and currently operates an 8 inch silica-on-silicon line for the fabrication of integrated optical components in Gemfire's Livingston facility in Scotland. It also operates 40 and 100 Gbit/s optical packaging lines at the facility, and noted at the time that these were nearing capacity.

Compound Photonics (CP) is a privately held photonics company with a focus on liquid crystal on silicon display devices and laser technologies for a range of applications in the projection and near to eye display markets.


Commenting on the acquisition, Bardia Pezeshki, Kaiam CEO, said, "… future transceivers that run at higher speed and use complex modulation formats will require integrated photonic elements that are highly differentiated and will not be readily available in the market… this new facility will give Kaiam this essential PIC capability, positioning it to meet customers' needs for improving speed, cost, power, density and manufacturing scale".


SiFive Raises $8.5m for RISC-V based custom chips

SiFive based in San Francisco, the fabless provider of customised, open-source-enabled semiconductors:

a.         Co-founded in 2015 by Krste Asanovic, currently the company's chief architect, Yunsup Lee, currently CTO, and Andrew Waterman, currently chief engineer, the inventors of RISC-V technology.

b.         Established with the aim of providing access to custom silicon chip designs leveraging RISC-V technology.

Announced that it has raised $8.5 million in a Series B round led by Spark Capital, with the participation of Osage University Partners and existing investor Sutter Hill Ventures. The latest funding brings the total investment in SiFive to $13.5 million and comes as the company reports increasing demand for RISC-V IP. In conjunction with the new funding, Todd Dagres, general partner at Spark Capital, is to join the SiFive board of directors.

SiFive is a fabless provider of custom semiconductors based on the free and open RISC-V instruction set architecture. Founded by the inventors of RISC-V, SiFive stated that in the first six months of availability, more than 1,000 HiFive1 software development boards have been purchased and delivered to developers in over 40 countries.

SiFive launched its Freedom Everywhere platform, designed for micro-controller, embedded, IoT and wearable applications, and Freedom Unleashed platform for machine learning, storage and networking applications in July 2016. In November, it announced general availability of the Freedom Everywhere 310 (FE310) SoC and HiFive1 software development board.

The company noted that RISC-V has established an ecosystem of more than 60 companies that includes Google, HPE, Microsoft, IBM, Qualcomm, NVIDIA, Samsung and Microsemi, while member companies and third-party open-source contributors are helping build a suite of software and toolchains that includes GCC and binutils.


Alaska's GCI deploys Aricent ANS

Alaska telco General Communication (GCI) has selected a combination of Aricent Autonomous Network Solution (ANS) and Monolith Software's AssureNow platform to integrate its enterprise infrastructure and enhance communication service quality and establish a dynamic service environment to enable the delivery of new digital services.

The largest telco in Alaska, GCI offers a range of services including voice, video, broadband data services and wireless to businesses and residential customers, and is deploying Aricent ANS with the Monolith AssureNow platform to unify information, automate remediation and expedite issue resolution to help improve quality control and performance management.

The overall solution provides a complete view of infrastructure comprising converged IP and infrastructure from cable, IP LAN/WAN, core, wireless and transport domains, enabling zero-touch policy orchestration, intelligent predictive analysis, automated correlation and application performance management for enhanced digital services improved operational efficiency.

GCI stated that the synergy between its technical expertise, Monolith's AssureNow and Aricent Autonomous Network Solution is intended to strengthen its operational capabilities and accelerate the development of new solutions in Alaska.

Monolith's AssureNow platform enables end-to-end, unified management of services, performance and faults across legacy and dynamic virtualised domains. GCI noted that by implementing AssureNow it will be able to phase out older networking tools while improving and simplifying issue tracking.

The recently launched Aricent ANS is designed to enable rapid network transformation for network equipment vendors and service providers. The solution facilitates the transition toward self-steering networks to support new interactions and platforms that can deliver new customer services.