Showing posts with label Voyager. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Voyager. Show all posts

Monday, July 2, 2018

Vodafone tests Voyager whitebox for packet/optical transport

Vodafone has conducted a live network trial of a whitebox packet/optical transport solution based on the Telecom Infra Project’s Voyager design.

Vodafone used the Voyager devices with a network OS by Cumulus Networks and a NetOS Software Defined Network orchestration from Zeetta Networks on a live network in Spain.

ADVA played a key role as one of the architects of the platform.

Cumulus said the trial demonstrated how a Voyager whitebox can be implemented over an existing optical infrastructure. The results of the trial include:
  • Demonstrated ability to deliver 800 Gbps per rack
  • Demonstrated ability to dynamically adapt the system modulation as fiber conditions changed
  • Proved that “a live network can set up optical services and keep them running” 
  • SDN-based optical commissioning (modulation, power, frequency) to 200 Gbps, 16QAM, and 100 Gbps quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) 
  • SDN-based optical real-time monitoring with automatic modulation adaptation from 200 Gbps, 16QAM to 100Gbit/s, QPSK maintaining connectivity with 50% capacity of traffic in the case of optical line degradation and reverting automatically to 16QAM when the degradation was fixed 
  • Upgrade of a legacy 10 Gbps-based legacy WDM system with 4 x 200 Gbps wavelengths for a total of 800 Gbps of extra capacity
"We wanted to show how Voyager's variable-rate transceivers can be used to match speeds and modulation formats with actual line conditions,” said Santiago Tenorio, Vodafone’s Group Head of Networks Strategy and Architecture. “Thanks to a streamlined network operating system and SDN automation, we showed how our live network can set-up optical services and keep them running, reduce unnecessary and lengthy customer service interruptions, and improve network utilization."

“The successful results from Vodafone’s live trial represent a significant step toward how optical networks will be designed in the future,” said JR Rivers, Co-founder and CTO at Cumulus Networks. “Cumulus has found success bringing disaggregation to the data center and we are now applying that model to optical networks, which haven’t been disrupted in decades. We believe buy-in from top providers like Vodafone validates the importance of shifting to a disaggregated model in telecommunications. By sharing the success of the trial, we hope to encourage other providers in the optical industry to consider the benefits of moving away from traditional vendor lock-in and embracing open alternatives.”

Cumulus Networks recently announced early access of Cumulus Linux for Voyager for NYSERNet, Internet2, GRnet and CESNET.

https://cumulusnetworks.com/products/voyager/

https://blog.advaoptical.com/en/vodafone-deploys-tips-voyager-in-a-live-network-trial-to-transform-optical-networks

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Cumulus supports TIP's Voyager Open Optical Routing Platform

Cumulus Networks is working to make its Linux implementation available on Voyager, the open transponder and routing platform of the Telecom Infra Project (TIP).

Voyager is an Open Packet DWDM system that disaggregates hardware from software and that can fulfill multiple use cases in metro and long-haul fiber optic transport networks. Facebook contributed Voyager to TIP to address operator needs for scalable, cost-effective backhaul infrastructure.

Voyager with Cumulus Linux is expected to be generally available for production use in early 2018 through partner ADVA Optical Networking.

The collaboration on the Voyager platform marks Cumulus Networks’ expansion beyond the data center networking market and into the Data Center Interconnect (DCI) market. More than 800 customers, including over a third of the Fortune 50, use Cumulus Networks technology to enable web-scale networking in their data centers. The combination of Cumulus Linux and Voyager extends the benefits of the Linux networking model – including increased operational efficiency and lower costs – to optical networks. Through Cumulus Linux, IP + optical networks reap the benefits of an open and flexible full-featured protocol stack that offers reliability, automation, programmability, telemetry based capabilities, and VXLAN support.

“Opening up closed, black-box systems enables innovation at every level, so that customers can meet the challenges facing their networks faster and more efficiently,” said Josh Leslie, CEO of Cumulus Networks. “We’re excited to work with the TIP community to bring open systems to networks beyond the data center.”

“Open approaches are key to achieving TIP’s mission of disaggregating the traditional network deployment approach,” said Hans-Juergen Schmidtke, Co-Chair of the TIP Open Optical Packet Transport project group. “Our collaboration with Cumulus Networks to enable Cumulus Linux on Voyager is an important contribution that will help accelerate the ecosystem’s adoption of Voyager.”

ADVA tests TIP Voyager in Colombia with InterNexa

ADVA Optical Networking and InterNexa performed a successful field trial of Telecom Infra Project’s Voyager open optical transponder over a 1,400 km optical fiber ring connecting the cities of Bogotá and Medellin.  The test delivered 200 Gbps on a single optical port.

The trial used an open “white box” architecture that disaggregates the hardware and software. Voyager integrates in a single rack unit (1RU) chassis IP packet technologies, switching and DWDM transponders. ADVA integrated the Voyager hardware and software components.

"We have found the Voyager Transponders very attractive for both their capacity on the DWDM line side for 100G/200Gbps speeds, and for the support of Layer 2 and Layer 3 protocols and features,” said Gabriel J. Vivares Arias, Product Development Specialist at InterNexa’s Product Management. “So we worked with ADVA Optical Networking to design a trial in our network, over our DWDM system that interconnects the main cities of Colombia -- Bogotá, Medellin and Cali -- in order to run tests on an optical fiber network with a ring topology approximately 1,400 km long, based on a 50GHz ROADM architecture designed to support 40 x 100G channels, with optical links up to 130 km on the direct route Medellin - Bogotá (370 km in total) and at least 3 links with 180 km on average on the route through Cali, Medellin - Cali - Bogotá (1,040 km in total)."