Showing posts with label ThousandEyes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ThousandEyes. Show all posts

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

ThousandEyes adds support for Alibaba Cloud to its global monitoring

ThousandEyes is boosting its Asia-Pacific monitoring capabilities with support for Alibaba Cloud. Specifically, ThousandEyes added 19 Alibaba Cloud regions worldwide, plus 13 new Cloud Agent locations across Asia-Pacific, including four new locations in India, bringing ThousandEyes Asia-Pacific vantage points to a total of 53 cities and global vantage points to a total of more than 180 cities. This latest expansion adds to ThousandEyes' existing Cloud Agent locations in IaaS providers, which currently includes 15 AWS regions, 15 GCP regions and 25 Azure regions.

"Global organizations today run on the Internet, connecting applications and services to end-users everywhere, and making deep Internet visibility non-negotiable, which is especially relevant for companies operating in Asia-Pacific where heavy sovereign controls impact Internet performance and digital experience," said ThousandEyes vice president of product Joe Vaccaro."

https://www.thousandeyes.com/press-releases/expanding-global-multi-cloud-monitoring-alibaba-cloud

Sunday, June 9, 2019

ThousandEyes: Cogent outage part of a larger BGP route leak

Last week's outage at a Cogent data center in London, which disrupted some Whatsapp traffic, was part of a larger BGP route leak, according to an updated analysis from ThousandEyes.

The disruption had nothing to do with the Whatsapp service itself, writes Archana Kesavan, but was the result of a major BGP route leak by Swiss colocation provider, Safe Host. Her analysis indicates that "Safe Host leaked thousands of prefixes which had a cascading effect on the availability of those services when the routes were accepted and propagated by service providers, such as China Telecom, and then further accepted by other ISPs such as Cogent."

https://blog.thousandeyes.com/whatsapp-disruption-just-one-symptom-of-broader-route-leak/


Thursday, June 6, 2019

WhatsApp outage linked to Cogent' London data center

WhatsApp users from multiple locations around the world experienced a major service disruption on Thursday, 06-June-2019 from 10:50am - 11:30am BST & from 1:10pm - 2:13pm BST.

ThousandEyes picked up the outages & identified the issue to 100% packet loss w/in Cogent’s London data center.


https://www.thousandeyes.com/

Sunday, June 2, 2019

ThousandEyes captures visualization of Google Cloud outage

From its monitoring network of 249 global vantage points, ThousandEyes detected the global outage with Google Cloud Platform beginning around 12-12:15pm PT.

ThousandEyes experienced 100% packet loss trying to reach a service hosted in GCP USwest. All traffic dropped at the edge of Google's network.

Angelique Medina, ThousandEyes product marketing director, stated: “ThousandEyes can confirm Google’s report of network congestion as a likely root cause of Sunday’s massive 4-hour outage, as we started seeing elevated packet loss in Google’s network as early as 12pm PT between sites on the eastern US, including Ashburn, Atlanta and Chicago, and various Google-hosted services. These issues started to impact users globally approximately 20 minutes prior to their public announcement of the issue, showing an early indication of what was to come. For the majority of the duration of the 4+ hour outage, ThousandEyes detected 100% packet loss for certain Google services from 249 of our global vantage points in 170 cities around the world. Starting at around 3:30pm PT, we started to see services slowly become reachable again, and the issue appeared to fully resolve by 4:45pm PT.”

https://www.thousandeyes.com/






Wednesday, December 19, 2018

2019 Network Predictions

by Angelique Medina, senior product market manager, ThousandEyes

2018 has seen the acceleration of modern infrastructure from public cloud, SaaS, hybrid and SD-WAN. 2019 will see enterprises feeling the impact of this dramatic shift more than ever.

Internet unpredictability impacts become more visible as SD-WAN projects spread and mature

SD-WAN adoption is on the rise, and with it, the enterprise’s growing dependence on the Internet. Before moving to SD-WAN, most enterprises only had to worry about Internet performance from its data centers to key services. With SD-WAN, they’re increasingly leveraging DIA and broadband connectivity and grappling with hundreds or thousands of sites, each of which will have distinct Internet paths to many different cloud-based services. Shifting from a carrier managed service to the Internet, means that there’s an exponential rise in the number of service providers that can potentially impact performance for branch office users. As a large number of enterprises move from deployment into their operations stage in 2019, the impact of Internet unpredictability will become more evident. As a result, more enterprise IT teams will start to develop operational capabilities to deal with Internet-centric issues.

Digital experience will confront the weight of backend multiplicity

Enterprises and SaaS providers are increasingly leveraging third-party APIs and cloud-services as part of their web and application architectures. This distributed, microservices approach to building applications not only provides best-of-breed functions, it enables companies to quickly consume and deliver new services. Applications today might leverage dozens of APIs to handle services such as messaging and voice, maps, and payments, while also connecting to cloud-based services such as CRM, ERP and analytics. Websites are also getting weighed down by the addition of many externally hosted applications. Even a seemingly simple “Buy Now” function on an ecommerce site will invoke many external services, including payment gateways, CRM, analytics, inventory, fulfillment, and potentially many others.

The weight of all of these external dependencies means that websites are going to continue to get slower, while at the same time their risk surface increases. Since these services are not internally operated, isolating the source of a problem when something goes wrong can be challenging, particularly since these services are connected to over the Internet. The question of whether the application or the network is at fault will become “Which application?” and “Which network?”.

Understanding the tradeoff of function over user experience and knowing how every third-party web or app component impacts performance will get even more critical to enterprises and SaaS providers in 2019.

Fragmentation, not bifurcation of the Internet

Eric Schmidt, former CEO of Google, famously predicted that the Internet would bifurcate into a US-led Internet and a Chinese-led Internet by 2028. While we still have plenty of time to see how this prediction plays out, in the near term, the Internet is shifting towards fragmentation. Multiple nation states, including Iran, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Russia, have joined China in creating a walled-off Internet, using a variety of technical, social, and political techniques. As more countries pursue nationalist agendas and choose to opt out of regional or global alignments, we will see increasing Internet fragmentation. This will initially take the form of politically-motivated censorship, but will expand to include the broader curation of connectivity based on politically-prescribed social and cultural norms.

Hybrid starts tilting to the cloud

While the data center will continue to lose ground in favor of cloud, enterprises still early in their cloud journey or who have special security or regulatory constraints will keep hybrid cloud alive. To extend their reach into the enterprise data center, public cloud providers have begun offering on-premises solutions, featuring greater agility, favorable economics, and a single pane of glass for management. While still in its early days, Azure Stack has already announced that it has deployed customers, while newly announced AWS Outpost (scheduled to release in the second half of 2019) has the potential to be highly disruptive to the data center landscape.

2019 will see an increased tilting of hybrid towards public cloud providers, though a lack of maturity may cause an initial freezing of of the hybrid market, particularly for AWS customers, who will want to consider an AWS offering over existing network providers once commercially available.

The Edge gets less “edgy”

Early edge architectures, where the data of billions of IoT devices is notionally processed at central points by infrastructure in public cloud or private data centers, presented challenges, ranging from security to physics (increased latency) and cost (bandwidth). The introduction of intermediary nodes into edge architectures will address the latency and security concerns of a strictly core/edge architecture, moving edge deployments in 2019 from largely theoretical to realizable.

Intermediary nodes are designed to perform some of the processing functions of the cloud closer to the edge, which will help ensure better performance and scale for users and devices and help drive IoT and edge deployments. These nodes are already available from a variety of vendors, including public cloud providers, such as Microsoft. Microsoft has previously stated that they want their Azure cloud data centers be 50ms from everywhere. These new intermediary nodes will help extend the reach of cloud-centric infrastructure to the range of single digit milliseconds and make IoT and edge computing aspirations a reality.

Cyber attacks focus on foundational Internet systems for maximum effect

The pervasive risk associated with offering a digital service has forced most large enterprises and digital businesses to employ sophisticated systems of defense. These systems are designed to handle increasingly large-scale attacks, such as the one launched against GitHub earlier this year. That attack was the largest ever recorded and although it was disruptive, it was successfully mitigated through a highly elastic cloud-based DDoS protector called Prolexic. This and other tools make launching an impactful attack against a high-value target more challenging to pull off, which may be one reason why the number of DDoS attacks is trending downward, particularly in North America and Europe. This doesn’t mean that cyber attacks are going away. Cyber attacks will continue to make headlines in 2019, but they will largely take an indirect approach, exploiting relational weaknesses in foundational Internet systems, such as DNS and BGP routing.

Two incidents this year, one malicious, the other unintentional, underscored the vulnerability of even the most sophistical digital businesses to service disruption. In the case of the malicious incident, Amazon’s DNS service, Route 53, was hijacked, which enabled a cryptocurrency theft and led to many customer sites, including Instagram and CNN, becoming partially unreachable. The attackers who pulled off this digital hijacking and robbery made no attempt to penetrate Amazon’s infrastructure. Instead, they compromised a small Internet Service Provider in Columbus, Ohio, using them to propagate false routes to Amazon’s DNS service. The implicit trust built into Internet routing allowed this attack to take place. The fact that the hijacked service (translating URLs into Internet addresses) is a critical dependency meant that the impact was massive and went far beyond the intended target.

Indirect attacks, taking advantage of critical dependencies outside of the control of the intended target, will continue to grow in 2019, netting more high-profile victims while maximizing the scope of collateral damage.

The operational impact of cloud adoption pushes enterprises to reexamine their management stack mix

Now that SaaS has mainstreamed, with most enterprises shifting their application consumption model from internal to the cloud, we can expect to see a follow-on shift in IT operations stacks in the coming year, as more enterprises begin to realize that the existing toolset is not oriented to address externally-hosted applications.

The traditional IT operations stack is rich with tools, but as the usage of SaaS applications and cloud-based services has increased, the domain of many of these tools is narrowing, exposing gaps in visibility for SaaS applications and their delivery over the Internet. Network tools that collect data from on-premises will see a reduction in usage and budget allocation, making room for cloud-specific tools and technologies designed to provide visibility into networks and services that enterprises rely on (such as ISPs and SaaS apps) but that they do not own or control. This new operations stack will continue to feature traditional toolsets, but its proportional emphasis will favor cloud-focused technologies.

Thursday, November 8, 2018

ThousandEyes: AWS vs Azure vs Google Cloud

ThousandEyes, which leverages a cloud platform to offer visibility throughout the global Internet, published its 2018 Public Cloud Performance Benchmark Report, comparing the global network performance of the three major public cloud providers—Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud Platform (GCP) and Microsoft Azure.

The company says its results should be examined through the lens of the individual business planning or evaluating their cloud architectural choices as regional performance differences can make a significant impact in terms of performance gains or losses. The results are based on data gathered from periodically monitoring bi- directional network performance such as latency, packet loss and jitter to, within and between multiple global regions of the three public cloud providers over a four-week period.

Key findings of the 2018 ThousandEyes Public Cloud Performance Benchmark Report:

  • Architectural differences between providers impacts service delivery: AWS sends traffic over the Internet for the majority of the service delivery path, whereas GCP and Azure do not, instead using their own backbone networks. Increased exposure to the Internet means there is greater operational risk and impact on performance predictability.
  • Performance variations by region: geographical performance variations exist across the three cloud providers, most noticeably in the LATAM and Asia regions. Decision-makers should consult the detailed findings to choose the best cloud provider on a per-region basis to ensure optimal performance globally.
  • Multi-cloud network performance is strong: despite being competitors, the three providers peer directly with one another, eliminating the dependence on third-party ISPs. Plus, traffic almost never leaves the provider backbone networks, meaning there is very little loss and jitter in end-to-end communication. Decision-makers need not worry about performance in multi-cloud architectures.
  • When connecting Europe to India, GCP exhibited three times the network latency compared to AWS and Azure.
  • In Asia, GCP and Azure exhibited more network performance stability than AWS, which demonstrated 35% less network performance stability than GCP and 56% less than Azure.
  • When connecting Europe to Singapore, AWS and GCP were 1.5 times slower than Azure.
"Multi-national organizations that are embracing digital transformation and venturing into the cloud need to be aware of the geographical performance differences between the major public clouds when making global multi-cloud decisions," said Archana Kesevan, report author and senior product marketing manager at ThousandEyes. "To help global businesses with this assessment, ThousandEyes is providing an unbiased, third-party perspective on public cloud performance as it relates to end-user experience—and at the same time, breaking the mold of survey-based research and vendor-led reporting."

The 28-page report can be downloaded here:
https://www.thousandeyes.com/research/public-cloud



Wednesday, October 10, 2018

ThousandEyes: Fortune 50 companies unprepared for DNS attack

A whopping 68 percent of the top 50 companies on the Fortune 500 rankings are not adequately prepared for the next major attack on the DNS, according to the results of the 2018 ThousandEyes Global DNS Performance Report, which also found similar vulnerability among 44 percent of the top 25 SaaS providers, as well as 72% of the Financial Times Stock Exchange (FTSE) 100 companies.

Key findings of the 2018 ThousandEyes DNS Infrastructure Performance Report include:
Leading enterprises and SaaS providers remain needlessly vulnerable: DNS best practices are not widespread in major enterprises and SaaS providers, exposing them to severe risk and potentially making them vulnerable to the next attack such as Dyn experienced nearly two years ago.
Not every DNS infrastructure is created equal: DNS performance varies widely for public resolver providers and managed providers across regions and countries. Consideration for managed providers should be based on measured performance, rather than brand, or scope of global presence. 
Social and political systems create unpredictability: DNS performance variations correlate to countries known to interfere with Internet behavior, and controls over technology create risks for doing digital business in certain regions.

The 2018 ThousandEyes Global DNS Performance Report also provides an assessment of  DNS providers. Out of fifteen measured public DNS providers, newcomer Cloudflare was found to have overall fastest performance, followed by Google and OpenDNS, both of which improved over their performance in the 2017 ThousandEyes analysis. Top providers varied by region and country.

Performance highlights of the 2018 report include:

  • In the United States, Google was the top performer, followed by Cloudflare and OpenDNS. 
  • In the UK, Level 3 had the best performance, followed by Google and OpenDNS. 
  • In Japan, Cloudflare was the fastest performer, with Google in second and Neustar in third place. 

“Without DNS, there is no Internet. It's how users find a company’s apps, sites and services on the Internet. A DNS performance issue or attack can have a critical impact on customer experience, revenue, and brand reputation,” said Angelique Medina, senior product marketing manager at ThousandEyes. “The ThousandEyes report highlights vital insights that can help organizations design a more effective DNS infrastructure — because even the most basic DNS decisions can determine how a company’s application or service, and ultimately how their overall brand, is perceived.” 

The full 2018 ThousandEyes DNS Performance Report is available here.
https://www.thousandeyes.com/global-dns-performance-report

See also