Showing posts with label Spectrum. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Spectrum. Show all posts

Monday, April 10, 2017

AT&T Buys 39 GHz and 28 GHz Licenses for $1.6 Billion

AT&T agreed to acquire Straight Path Communications, which holds a nationwide portfolio of millimeter wave (mmWave) spectrum, including 39 GHz and 28 GHz licenses.

Specifically, AT&T will acquire 735 mmWave licenses in the 39 GHz band and 133 licenses in the 28 GHz band. These licenses cover the entire United States, including all of the top 40 markets.

The deal was valued at $1.6 billion, which includes liabilities and amounts to be remitted to the FCC per the terms of Straight Path’s January 2017 consent decree.  Straight Path shareholders will receive $1.25 billion, or $95.63 per share, which will be paid using AT&T stock.

AT&T said the purchase completment its January acquisition of FiberTower and augments the company’s holdings of mmWave spectrum.

The transaction is subject to FCC review, and the two companies expect to close within 12 months.

http://www.att.com




Wednesday, February 1, 2017

AT&T to Acquire FiberTower for 24 and 39 GHz Spectrum

AT&T confirmed its intention to acquire FiberTower, a privately-held company that holds an extensive spectrum footprint in 24 GHz and 39 GHz bands. Financial terms were not disclosed.

At the AT&T Innovation Summit in San Francisco, John Donovan, Chief Strategy Officer and Group President at AT&T, said the acquired spectrum assets will have advance the company's 5G plans.

http://www.att.com
http://www.fibertower.com

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Sprint Extends 2.5 GHz Spectrum with High Performance User Equipment

Sprint announced plans to leverage High Performance User Equipment (HPUE) to optimize its 2.5 GHz network coverage.

Sprint said HPUE technology, which was certified by 3GPP earlier this month, is capable of extending its 2.5 GHz coverage by up to 30 percent to nearly match its mid-band 1.9 GHz spectrum performance, including indoors where an estimated 60 to 70 percent of wireless traffic is generated. HPUE is a new power class – Power Class 2 – for end-user devices such as smartphones, and is designed to improve the performance of TDD-LTE Band 41 networks around the world. Sprint co-led the development of HPUE in conjunction with the Global TDD LTE Initiative (GTI) and companies such as China Mobile, SoftBank, Qualcomm Technologies Inc., Samsung, ZTE, Broadcom, MediaTek, Skyworks Solutions, Alcatel, Motorola, LG and Qorvo.

“HPUE is an incredible innovation that will dramatically improve the performance of our high-band spectrum and deliver an even better experience for the millions of customers on the Sprint network whether they’re streaming videos, playing games or using apps, both indoors and out,” said Dr. John Saw, Sprint CTO. “With HPUE, our customers using 2.5 GHz-capable phones can have nearly the same reach as our 1.9 GHz spectrum. This gives them all the coverage advantages of mid-band spectrum while maintaining the tremendous speed and capacity advantages of high-band spectrum.”

“The joint test between China Mobile and Sprint proved the benefits of HPUE technology, and China Mobile will continuously promote the availability and deployment of HPUE,” said Madam Yuhong Huang, Secretary General of GTI and Deputy General Manager of China Mobile Research Institute.

Sprint also confirmed that its network is ready for the initial roll-out of HPUE, including in its 250 LTE Plus markets. Samsung, one of Sprint’s most important ecosystem partners, is expected to support HPUE in devices slated for commercial launch in 2017.

Furthermore, Sprint will continue its deployment of three-channel carrier aggregation on 2.5 GHz sites. The company also anticipates leveraging a multitude of advanced technologies including multiple carrier aggregation, 256 QAM, 4x4 MIMO (multiple-input, multiple-output) and Massive MIMO to further enhance the capacity and coverage of its 2.5 GHz TDD-LTE spectrum.

http://newsroom.sprint.com/article_display.cfm?article_id=12399


Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Dish Plans to Use AWS-4 spectrum (2000-2020 MHz) for downlink

DISH Network notified the FCC that it is electing to use 20 MHz of AWS-4 uplink spectrum (2000-2020 MHz) for downlink operations, resulting in all 40 MHz of DISH’s AWS-4 spectrum being designated for downlink operations.

The 3GPP's RAN4 working group recently agreed on Band 70 specifications. Band 70 combines three spectrum blocks encompassing DISH’s current AWS-4 spectrum as downlink (2000-2020 MHz), DISH's H block downlink spectrum (1995-2000 MHz), and unpaired AWS-3 uplink spectrum (1695-1710 MHz). 3GPP formal approval will enable the development of devices and infrastructure that supports Band 70.

“Similar to Band 66 approved in December 2015, the asymmetric Band 70 includes a greater proportion of downlink spectrum relative to uplink, enhancing the overall utility of the spectrum as the growth of video and other downlink-intensive traffic continues to increase,” said Tom Cullen, DISH executive vice president of Corporate Development. “Consumer trends clearly support the efficient combination of different spectrum blocks into a single, asymmetric band. Moreover, our AWS-4 election leads to a better coexistence with the adjacent downlink PCS operations. We’re pleased with the working group level completion of Band 70 as these standards efforts are a necessary step in developing the ecosystem.”

DISH noted that it directly or indirectly has on average almost 80 MHz of spectrum nationwide, covering over 23 billion MHz-POPs.

http://www.dish.com

Friday, February 5, 2016

Telstra Books 1800 MHz Band in Australian Spectrum Auction

Telstra secured 57 blocks of spectrum licenses at an Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) auction. The blocks of spectrum in the 1800 MHz band cover 12 regions across Australia and will be used to enhance the delivery of 4G mobile services. Telstra will pay A$190 million for the spectrum licences, which have a term of 11 years.

"As a result of the auction, we’ll be at least doubling the amount of spectrum in the 1800 MHz band that we can use to provide 4G services in these areas. In fact, in some regions we will more than triple the amount available. Securing this extra spectrum allows Telstra to deliver more capacity to cater to our customers’ growing demand for mobile data. It will also enable mobile data to be delivered at even faster speeds," stated Telstra CEO Andy Penn.

http://www.telstra.com.au/aboutus/media/media-releases/telstra-customers-to-benefit-from-more-spectrum-in-1800-mhz-band.xml

Monday, November 2, 2015

World Radiocommunication Conference Seeks Consensus on Spectrum Allocations

The ITU's World Radiocommunication Conference 2015 (WRC-15 kicked off in Geneva and is scheduled to run through the end of November.

The WRC is held every three to four years to review, and, if necessary, revise the Radio Regulations, the international treaty governing the use of the radio-frequency spectrum and the geostationary-satellite and non-geostationary-satellite orbits.

WRC-15 will address a number of key issues, in particular:

  • Mobile broadband communications: Provision of additional frequencies to meet the rapidly growing demand for mobile broadband communications.
  • Emergency communications and disaster relief: Allocation of frequencies for advanced public protection and disaster relief.
  • Monitoring the environment and climate change: New allocations for earth-exploration satellite services with higher resolution radar imagery for improved global environmental monitoring.
  • Unmanned aircraft and wireless avionics systems: Spectrum for the aeronautical sector, related to the use of unmanned aircraft systems, and wireless avionics intra-communications to allow for the heavy and expensive wiring used in aircraft to be replaced by wireless systems.
  • Global flight tracking for civil aviation: WRC-15 will consider allocating spectrum for global flight tracking for improved safety.
  • Enhanced maritime communications systems: Maritime communications, facilitating the use of on-board digital transmissions and automatic identification system on vessels for improved navigation safety.
  • Road Safety: Allocation of frequencies for short range, high-resolution radars for collision avoidance systems in vehicles for increased road safety.
  • Operation of satellite systems: Allocation of spectrum for broadband satellite systems; providing for earth stations on-board moving platforms, such as ships and aircraft; and improving coordination procedures to make more efficient use of spectrum and satellite orbits.
  • Universal Time: examining the feasibility of achieving a continuous reference time-scale, by modifying Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

Saturday, September 26, 2015

Sprint to Sit Out 600 MHz Incentive Auction

Sprint has decided not to participate in the FCC's 600 MHz incentive auction next year.  In a blog posting, the company said its current spectrum holdings "are sufficient to provide its current and future customers great network coverage and be able to provide the consistent reliability, capacity, and speed that its customers demand."

“Sprint’s focus and overarching imperative must be on improving its network and market position in the immediate term so we can remain a powerful force in fostering competition, consumer benefits and innovation in the wireless broadband world,” stated Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure.  “Sprint has the spectrum it needs to deploy its network architecture of the future.”

The company also noted its efforts to increase coverage and capacity by densifying its network and increasing the number of cell sites using its existing spectrum.  Sprint is already deploying new technologies, such as carrier aggregation, that unlock the potential of its strong 2.5 GHz spectrum position.

http://newsroom.sprint.com/news-releases/sprint-statement-on-the-incentive-auction.htm

Sunday, August 9, 2015

FCC to Reserve Spectrum in 2016 Incentive Auction

The FCC reaffirmed its decision to establish a market-based spectrum reserve of up to 30 megahertz of spectrum  in the 600 MHz band in next year’s incentive auction.

Non-nationwide providers as well as nationwide providers who currently hold less than one-third of available high-quality low-band spectrum in a given license area will be eligible to utilize this first-of-its-kind reserve.

FCC Commissioner Tom Wheeler stated: "This reserve would provide protection that bidders without significant amounts of low-band spectrum could not be predatorily prohibited from gaining the necessary competitive capacity by those whose interest might be served by eliminating such competition. With today’s Reconsideration Order, we take the important step of reaffirming the bold pro-competition policy."

http://www.fcc.gov

Monday, February 2, 2015

Singapore Assigns 2.3GHz and 2.5 GHz TDD for HetNet Trials

The Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore (IDA) will assign some Time Division Duplex (“TDD”) spectrum in the 2.3 GHz and 2.5 GHz band in the short term to facilitate trials for Heterogeneous Network (HetNet) deployments.

IDA expects the HetNet trials in Singapore to last six to nine months.  IDA is currently studying the allocation of these TDD bands for the longer term, as part of its overall review of spectrum bands to be allocated for mobile broadband services.

https://www.ida.gov.sg/About-Us/Newsroom/Media-Releases/2015/Spectrum-in-TDD-bands-assigned-for-HetNet-trials

FCC Commissioner Questions DISH's AWS-3 Subsidy

FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai called for an investigation into how DISH Network Corp. qualified for a multi-billion discount in the recently completed AWS-3 spectrum auction.

By acting through two companies in which it holds an 85% stake, DISH was qualified as a small company in the auction, entitling it to a 25% discount on acquired spectrum.  Pai notes that DISH has annual revenues of almost $14 billion, a market capitalization of over $32 billion, and over 14 million customers.

http://www.fcc.gov/document/commissioner-pai-statement-abuse-designated-entity-program

Friday, January 30, 2015

AT&T Secures Nationwide 10x10 MHz AWS-3 Spectrum for $18.2 Billion

AT&T will pay $18.2 billion as the winning bidder on a near nationwide contiguous 10x10 MHz block of AWS-3 spectrum in the FCC's just completed Auction 97.

The licenses cover 307 million people representing 96 percent of the U.S. population and 96 of the Top 100 U.S. markets. AT&T said this spectrum includes 57 percent of MHz POPs covered by the valuable J-block of AWS-3 spectrum.

“Growth in our customers’ mobile data usage continues to explode, driven by mobile video traffic. This spectrum investment will be critical to AT&T staying ahead of customer demand and facilitate the next generation of mobile video entertainment,” said John Stankey, chief strategy officer-AT&T.

AT&T also stated that this spectrum investment, along with its other pending acquisitions, may cause the company to go above its 1.8x net-debt-to-EBITDA target. The company will use excess cash — after paying its dividend — over the next three years to pay down debt, and expects to return to historical debt ratios.

http://www.att.com


  • The FCC's Advanced Wireless Services (AWS-3) Auction 97 raised a record $44.899 billion in bids.  A total of 1,611 licenses total were, covering 65 MHz of spectrum in the 1695-1710 MHz, 1755-1780 MHz, and 2155-2180 MHz bands ("AWS-3" bands).

Verizon Spends $10.4 Billion at FCC's Spectrum Auction

Verizon Communications was the winning bidder or 181 licenses in the FCC's AWS-3 spectrum auction.  The company bid  $10.4 billion in total.  The licenses cover 192 million POPs, or 61 percent of the United States.

http://www.verizon.com
http://www.verizon.com/about/news/verizon-statement-aws-3-auction-results/

Thursday, January 29, 2015

FCC Raises $45 Billion in AWS-3 Spectrum Auction

The FCC's Advanced Wireless Services (AWS-3) auction drew to a close, raising a total of $44.899 billion.

A total of 1,611 licenses total were, covering 65 MHz of spectrum in the 1695-1710 MHz, 1755-1780 MHz, and 2155-2180 MHz bands ("AWS-3" bands).

The 1695-1710 MHz band is authorized for low-power mobile transmit (i.e., uplink) operations only. The 1755-1780 MHz frequencies in the paired 1755-1780/2155-2180 MHz band are authorized only for low-power mobile transmit (i.e., uplink) operations; the 2155-2180 MHz frequencies are authorized only for base station and fixed (i.e., downlink) operations. Mobiles and portables in the 1695-1710 MHz and 1755-1780 MHz bands may only operate when under the control of a base station, and AWS-3 equipment is subject to a basic interoperability requirement.

“Today we closed bidding Auction 97 – by far the highest-earning spectrum auction the United States has ever seen.  But it was much more than that.  This auction also marked a new era in spectrum policy, where a collaborative and unprecedented effort resulted in new commercial access to federal spectrum bands.  A bipartisan group of leaders in Congress, federal agencies – especially NTIA and DoD – the White House, industry, and the team at the FCC all came together to help meet the Nation’s demand for wireless broadband," stated FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler.

"If you had conducted a poll of analysts before the start of the AWS-3 auction, the highest prediction given for its yield would not have exceeded $18 billion.  Seventy-seven days and a record setting $44.89 billion later, Auction 97 has shown that demand for this spectrum was phenomenal," said FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn.

http://www.fcc.gov

Thursday, December 4, 2014

Biddding for AWS-3 Spectrum tops $40.7 Billion

After 49 rounds, bidding in the FCC's Advanced Wireless Services (AWS-3) auction has reached $40.7 billion.

A total of 1,614 licenses total are up for auction, covering 65 MHz of spectrum in the 1695-1710 MHz, 1755-1780 MHz, and 2155-2180 MHz bands ("AWS-3" bands).

The 1695-1710 MHz band is authorized for low-power mobile transmit (i.e., uplink) operations only. The 1755-1780 MHz frequencies in the paired 1755-1780/2155-2180 MHz band are authorized only for low-power mobile transmit (i.e., uplink) operations; the 2155-2180 MHz frequencies are authorized only for base station and fixed (i.e., downlink) operations. Mobiles and portables in the 1695-1710 MHz and 1755-1780 MHz bands may only operate when under the control of a base station, and AWS-3 equipment is subject to a basic interoperability requirement.

http://wireless.fcc.gov/auctions/default.htm?job=auction_summary&id=97

Monday, December 1, 2014

Dynamic Spectrum Alliance Builds Roster

The Dynamic Spectrum Alliance, a global organization advocating for laws and regulations that will lead to more efficient and effective spectrum utilization, announced the addition of AirTies, Aruba Networks, ATDI, Broadcom, and Saankhya Labs to its membership roster.

“Governments around the world recognize that expanding Internet access is key to their economic growth as it will help them deliver healthcare, education, emergency
communications, and other government services to their citizens, as well as enable a new generation of small- and medium-sized businesses and increase output for key sectors such as agriculture. Having just toured Asia and Africa, it is clear that leading regulators and policymakers now recognize that these goals can only be achieved with increased reliance on dynamic spectrum sharing regimes” said Prof. H Nwana, Executive Director of the Dynamic Spectrum Alliance.

The Dynamic Spectrum Alliance’s mission is to expand dynamic and opportunistic access to unused radio spectrum. It is not chartered to support any specific technology.

Some notable members of the alliance include BSkyB, Google, InterDigital, Mediatek, Microsoft, Japan's NICT and SpectraLink Wireless.

http://www.dynamicspectrumalliance.org/

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Bidding for AWS-3 Spectrum tops $37 billion

After 35 rounds, bidding in the FCC's Advanced Wireless Services (AWS-3) auction has reached $37.5 billion.

A total of 1,614 licenses total are up for auction, covering 65 MHz of spectrum in the 1695-1710 MHz, 1755-1780 MHz, and 2155-2180 MHz bands ("AWS-3" bands).

The 1695-1710 MHz band is authorized for low-power mobile transmit (i.e., uplink) operations only. The 1755-1780 MHz frequencies in the paired 1755-1780/2155-2180 MHz band are authorized only for low-power mobile transmit (i.e., uplink) operations; the 2155-2180 MHz frequencies are authorized only for base station and fixed (i.e., downlink) operations. Mobiles and portables in the 1695-1710 MHz and 1755-1780 MHz bands may only operate when under the control of a base station, and AWS-3 equipment is subject to a basic interoperability requirement.

http://wireless.fcc.gov/auctions/default.htm?job=auction_summary&id=97

Monday, November 10, 2014

UK to Auction 2.3 GHz and 3.4 GHz Spectrum

Ofcom, the official regulator for the UK, plans to auction spectrum in the 2.3 GHz and 3.4 GHz bands in late 2015 or early 2016. The bands are expected to be of interest to the mobile industry. Ofcom intends to hold an auction for a total of 190 MHz of spectrum in the two bands - equivalent to around three-quarters of the airwaves released by Ofcom through the 4G auction in 2013. The spectrum is currently used by the Ministry of Defence.

Ofcom noted that many existing mobile handsets from major manufacturers, including the Apple iPhone 5 and 6, HTC Desire and Samsung Galaxy, are already compatible with the 2.3 GHz spectrum in other markets. The band is so far being used for high-speed 4G mobile broadband networks in 10 countries outside Europe, including China, India and Australia.

The 3.4 GHz band is currently being used for 4G wireless broadband in six countries including the UK, Canada and Spain.

http://media.ofcom.org.uk/news/2014/new-spectrum-auction/

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

FCC Proposes Dynamic Spectrum Sharing in 3.5GHz Band for Citizens Broadband Radio

The FCC outlined a proposal for a New Citizens Broadband Radio Service in 3.5 GHz band.

The idea would be to designate 3.5 GHz spectrum as an "innovation band" for exploring new methods of spectrum sharing and promote a diverse array of network technologies, with a focus on relatively low-powered applications.

The FCC is proposing a three-tier authorization framework under which existing primary operations – including authorized federal users and grandfathered FSS earth stations - would
make up the Incumbent Access tier and would receive protection from harmful interference. The Citizens Broadband Radio Service would be divided into Priority Access and General Authorized Access (GAA) tiers of service, each of which would be required to operate on a non-interference basis with the Incumbent Access tier. The FCC is also proposing that any party that meets basic eligibility requirements under the Communications Act be eligible to hold a PAL or, when authorized, operate a CBSD on a GAA basis in the Citizens Broadband Radio Service.

The FCC noted that this proposed three-tier framework enjoys significant support from a diverse group of commenters, including AT&T, Google, Public Knowledge, and the Open Technology Institute at the New America Foundation. Others, including CTIA – The Wireless Association (CTIA), NSN, and Qualcomm have argued that a two-tier framework that would prohibit or segregate GAA users would be a more efficient way to manage the 3.5 GHz Band.

Under the FCC proposal, in place of fixed channel assignments, a Spectrum Access System (SAS) would dynamically assign bandwidth within given geographic areas to Priority Access Licensees and GAA users. The SAS would ensure that Priority Access Licensees have access to allotted 10 megahertz channels and that GAA users are provided access to at least 50 percent of the band. However, the exact spectral location of any given authorization, whether Priority Access or GAA, would not be fixed. For example, a licensee might have Priority Access rights for a single PAL, but the specific channel location assigned to that user would be managed by the SAS and could be reassigned from time to time (e.g., from 3550-3560 MHz to 3630-3640 MHz). Individual GAA users would be assigned available bandwidth of a size and spectral location determined by the SAS (e.g., from 3550-3556 MHz or 3662-3673 MHz).

http://www.fcc.gov/document/proposes-creation-new-citizens-broadband-radio-service-35-ghz

Additional background:


In July 2012, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) issued a report identifying 1,000 MHz of federal spectrum for sharing with the private sector.

U.S. federal policy should shift in favor "Shared-Use Spectrum Superhighways" instead the current plan which is to first clear federal users from specific bands and then auction this spectrum for the exclusive use of the highest bidder, according to a new report issued by

A Presidential memorandum issued in June 2010 requires that 500 MHz of spectrum to be made available for commercial use within 10 years.  However, a recent NTIA Study found that clearing just one 95 MHz band will take 10 years, cost $18 billion, and cause significant disruption. Moreover, the net revenue for the Treasury from the last successful auction of 45 MHz realized a net income of just a few hundred million a year ($5.3 billion total).

The PCAST report said its vision of shared spectrum is viable using existing technologies and is not dependent on cognitive or "smart" radios. Instead, a geo-location database could be used the share spectrum much like how the FCC is using managing TV bands. The TV Whitespaces system could be used as a model. Technical standards would need to be implemented for coexistence of transmitters and receivers to enable flexible sharing.

Monday, March 31, 2014

FCC Opens 5GHz Spectrum for Outdoor Wi-Fi

The FCC adopted new rules making 100 MHz of spectrum in the 5 GHz band more accessible for Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure (U-NII) devices.

U-NII devices play an important role in meeting public demand for wireless broadband service.

Currently U-NII devices operate in 555 megahertz of spectrum in the 5 GHz band, and are used for Wi-Fi and other high-speed wireless connections.

The new rules remove the current restriction on indoor-only use and increase the permissible power which will provide more robust access in the 5.150-5.250 GHz band.

The FCC said the new ruleswill allow U-NII devices to better integrate with other unlicensed portions of the 5 GHz band to offer faster speeds and reduce congestion at crowded Wi-Fi hot spots such as airports and convention centers.

The Commission also modified certain technical rules to improve protection for incumbent systems by requiring manufacturers to secure their devices against illegal modification which could cause
interference to incumbent users in the band.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler wrote: "This is a big win for consumers who will be able to enjoy faster connections and less congestion, as more spectrum will be available to handle Wi-Fi traffic. It will make it easier to get online wirelessly in public places like airports and convention centers, as well as in your living room. This is also a big win for American innovators. The changes we are making will provide fertile ground for the growth of “Gigabit Wi-Fi” – the latest generation of ultra-high-speed, high-capacity Wi-Fi that can provide data speeds in excess of 1 Gigabit per second."

http://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-increases-5ghz-spectrum-wi-fi-other-unlicensed-uses

FCC Sets Stage for Auction of 65 MHz of AWS Spectrum

The FCC adopted new rules that set flexible-use regulatory, licensing, and technical rules for 65 megahertz of spectrum in the AWS-3 band, which includes the 1695-1710 MHz, 1755-1780 MHz, and 2155-2180 MHz bands.  The action establishes a band plan that makes spectrum available in a mix of spectrum block and geographic license area sizes to meet the needs of large and small wireless providers.

The FCC said its order also establishes construction deadlines and other service rules, including a requirement that AWS-3 devices be interoperable within AWS-3 and AWS-1 frequencies.

This spectrum will be available on a shared basis with federal incumbents in accordance with detailed plans for these agencies to relocate out of the frequencies or share within the frequencies.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler wrote: "The new capacity will expand the workhorse AWS-1 commercial wireless band to enable faster wireless speeds and more capacity to help satisfy consumers’ voracious appetite for mobile data. This proceeding represents a step forward in spectrum policy. Some of the spectrum being auctioned is already available in the Commission’s inventory. But 40 megahertz of the spectrum to be  auctioned is used nearly exclusively by federal agencies today."

http://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-sets-stage-auction-65-mhz-spectrum-mobile-broadband

See also