Showing posts with label Silicon Photonics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Silicon Photonics. Show all posts

Thursday, December 23, 2021

Juniper picks Synopsys for developing photonics-enabled chips

Synopsys is supplying its OptoCompiler platform, including the OptSim and PrimeSim HSPICE simulation solutions, to Juniper Networks to accelerate the development of photonic-enabled chips for the next generation of optical communications.

Juniper plans to use Synopsys solutions to design and optimize its hybrid silicon and InP optical platform.

"Synopsys offers a unique, unified photonic and electronic design suite, which accelerates customer design cycles and time-to-market," said Tom Mader, head of Silicon Photonics at Juniper Networks. "This will enable Juniper silicon photonics to bring our revolutionary hybrid integrated laser platform to a broad array of customers in several photonic market segments, with the potential to lower cost and eliminate product barriers to entry."

Synopsys says its OptSim solution brings together photonic system and circuit simulation capabilities and provides electro-optical (E/O) co-simulation with the Synopsys PrimeSim HSPICE Simulator, the industry's 'gold standard' for accurate circuit simulation and the cornerstone of the Synopsys PrimeSim Continuum Solution. It also integrates seamlessly with the Synopsys PrimeWave design environment, the simulation and analysis environment of the OptoCompiler platform. The OptSim solution comes with an extensive photonic model library and is enabled for a wide variety of photonic IC foundries.

"Demand for higher bandwidth in intra-data center communications is driving companies like Juniper to deploy silicon photonic solutions to achieve the next level in performance," said Aveek Sarkar, VP of Customer Success for Analog Mixed-Signal/Custom & Photonics at Synopsys. "Synopsys is a pioneering solution provider in delivering robust solutions for electrical/optical co-design and co-simulation to enable next-generation photonic chips."

http://www.synopsys.com

Tuesday, December 21, 2021

Tower Semi and Juniper develop silicon photonics process

Tower Semiconductor and Juniper Networks announced a silicon photonics (SiPho) foundry-ready process with integrated III-V lasers, amplifiers modulators and detectors. 

Potential applications include optical connectivity in datacenters and telecom networks, as well as AI, LiDAR and other sensors. 

The new platform co-integrates III-V lasers, semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA), electro-absorption modulators (EAM) and photodetectors with silicon photonics devices, all monolithically on a single chip. This enables smaller, higher-channel count and more power-efficient optical architectures and solutions. Foundry availability will enable a broad array of product developers to create highly integrated photonic integrated circuits (PICs) for diverse markets.   

Process design kits (PDK) are expected to be available by year end and the first open multi-project wafer (MPW) run are expected to be offered early next year. First samples of full 400Gb/s and 800Gb/s PICs reference designs with integrated laser are expected to be available in the second quarter of 2022. 

“Our mutual development work with Tower has been extraordinarily successful in qualifying this innovative silicon photonics technology in a high-volume manufacturing facility,” said Rami Rahim, CEO of Juniper Networks. “By offering this capability to the entire industry, Juniper offers the potential to radically reduce the cost of optics while lowering the barrier to entry for customers”. 

“Our partnership with Juniper on silicon photonics is bringing a paradigm shift for product development across our industry,” said Russell Ellwanger, CEO of Tower Semiconductor. “It is now possible to mix the advantages of III-V semiconductors with high-volume silicon photonics manufacturing. Being the singular open market, integrated laser silicon photonics platform, and having a multi-year advantage over any potential foundry competitor, we are jointly creating breakthrough products with truly unique value for our industry and for society as a whole”. 

https://towersemi.com/2021/12/21/12212021/

Wednesday, December 8, 2021

Intel establishes Integrated Photonics Research Center

Intel Labs has established an academically-oriented Integrated Photonics Research Center with a mission to accelerate optical input/output (I/O) technology innovation in performance scaling and integration with a specific focus on photonics technology and devices, CMOS circuits and link architecture, and package integration and fiber coupling.

The Intel Research Center for Integrated Photonics for Data Center Interconnects will bring together leading university researchers to accelerate optical I/O technology innovation in performance scaling and integration. The research vision is to explore a technology scaling path that satisfies energy efficiency and bandwidth performance requirements for the next decade and beyond. 

"At Intel Labs, we’re strong believers that no one organization can successfully turn all the requisite innovations into research reality. By collaborating with some of the top scientific minds from across the United States, Intel is opening the doors for the advancement of integrated photonics for the next generation of compute interconnect. We look forward to working closely with these researchers to explore how we can overcome impending performance barriers,” stated James Jaussi, senior principal engineer and director of the PHY Research Lab in Intel Labs.

The researchers participating in the Research Center include:

  • John Bowers, University of California, Santa Barbara
    Project: Heterogeneously Integrated Quantum Dot Lasers on Silicon.
    Description: The UCSB team will investigate issues with integrating indium arsenide (InAs) quantum dot lasers with conventional silicon photonics. The goal of this project is to characterize expected performance and design parameters of single frequency and multiwavelength sources.
  • Pavan Kumar Hanumolu, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
    Project: Low-power optical transceivers enabled by duo-binary signaling and baud-rate clock recovery.
    Description: This project will develop ultra-low-power, high-sensitivity optical receivers using novel trans-impedance amplifiers and baud-rate clock and data recovery architectures. The prototype optical transceivers will be implemented in a 22 nm CMOS process to demonstrate very high jitter tolerance and excellent energy efficiency.
  • Arka Majumdar, University of Washington
    Project:
    Nonvolatile reconfigurable optical switching network for high-bandwidth data communication.
    Description: The UW team will work on low-loss, nonvolatile electrically reconfigurable silicon photonic switches using emerging chalcogenide phase change materials. Unlike existing tunable mechanisms, the developed switch will hold its state, allowing zero static power consumption.
  • Samuel Palermo, Texas A&M University
    Project:
    Sub-150fJ/b optical transceivers for data center interconnects.
    Description: This project will develop energy-efficient optical transceiver circuits for a massively parallel, high-density and high-capacity photonic interconnect system. The goal is to improve energy efficiency by employing dynamic voltage frequency scaling in the transceivers, low-swing voltage-mode drivers, ultra-sensitive optical receivers with tight photodetector integration, and low-power optical device tuning loops.
  • Alan Wang, Oregon State University
    Project:
    0.5V silicon microring modulators driven by high-mobility transparent conductive oxide.
    Description: This project seeks to develop a low driving voltage, high bandwidth silicon microring resonator modulator (MRM) through heterogeneous integration between the silicon MOS capacitor with high-mobility Ti:In2O3 The device promises to overcome the energy efficiency bottleneck of the optical transmitter and can be co-packaged in future optical I/O systems.
  • Ming Wu, University of California, Berkeley
    Project:
    Wafer-scale optical packaging of silicon photonics.
    Description: The UC Berkeley team will develop integrated waveguide lenses that have potential to enable non-contact optical packaging of fiber arrays with low loss and high tolerances.
  • S.J. Ben Yoo, University of California, Davis
    Project:
    Athermal and power-efficient scalable high-capacity silicon-photonic transceivers.
    Description: The UC Davis team will develop extremely power-efficient athermal silicon-photonic modulator and resonant photodetector photonic integrated circuits scaling to 40 Tb/s capacity at 150 fJ/b energy efficiency and 16 Tb/s/mm I/O density. To achieve this, the team will also develop a new 3D packaging technology for vertical integration of photonic and electronic integrated circuits with 10,000 pad-per-square-mm interconnect-pad-density.

https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/newsroom/news/intel-launches-integrated-photonics-research-center.html

Intel shows micro-ring modulators, all-silicon photodetectors, multi-lambda lasers

Intel showcased a number of advancements in the field of optical interconnects, advancing its long-term ambition to bring optical I/O directly into silicon packages. During a virtual Intel Labs day presentatio, the company demonstrated advances in key technology building blocks, including with light generation, amplification, detection, modulation, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) interface circuits and package integration. 

Key technology building blocks showcased:

  • Micro-ring modulators: Conventional silicon modulators take up too much area and are costly to place on IC packages. By developing micro-ring modulators, Intel has miniaturized the modulator by a factor of more than 1,000, thereby eliminating a key barrier to integrating silicon photonics onto a compute package.
  • All-silicon photodetector: For decades, the industry has believed silicon has virtually no light detection capability in the 1.3-1.6um wavelength range. Intel showcased research that proves otherwise. Lower cost is one of the main benefits of this breakthrough.
  • Integrated semiconductor optical amplifier: As the focus turns to reducing total power consumption, integrated semiconductor optical amplifiers are an indispensable technology, made possible with the same material used for the integrated laser.
  • Integrated multi-wavelength lasers: Using a technique called wavelength division multiplexing, separate wavelengths can be used from the same laser to convey more data in the same beam of light. This enables additional data to be transmitted over a single fiber, increasing bandwidth density.
  • Integration: By tightly integrating silicon photonics and CMOS silicon through advanced packaging techniques, we can gain three benefits: lower power, higher bandwidth and reduced pin count. Intel is the only company that has demonstrated integrated multi-wavelength lasers and semiconductor optical amplifiers, all-silicon photodetectors, and micro-ring modulators on a single technology platform tightly integrated with CMOS silicon. This research breakthrough paves the path for scaling integrated photonics.

Intel said these advancements will enable future architectures that are more disaggregated, with multiple functional blocks such as compute, memory, accelerators and peripherals spread throughout the entire network and interconnected via optical and software in high-speed and low-latency links.

“We are approaching an I/O power wall and an I/O bandwidth gap that will dramatically hinder performance scaling. The rapid progress Intel is making in integrated photonics will enable the industry to fully re-imagine data center networks and architectures that are connected by light. We have now demonstrated all of the critical optical technology building blocks on one silicon platform, tightly integrated with CMOS silicon. Our research on tightly integrating photonics with CMOS silicon can systematically eliminate barriers across cost, power and size constraints to bring the transformative power of optical interconnects to server packages,” stated James Jaussi, senior principal engineer and director of PHY Lab, Intel Labs.

Without such advancements, Intel warns the industry will soon reach the practical limits of electrical I/O performance - what it calls an "I/O power wall".


https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/newsroom/news/progress-integrated-photonics-data-centers.html#gs.ibzo2u

Thursday, October 28, 2021

DustPhotonics raises $33M for its silicon photonics

DustPhotonics, a start-up based in Modi'in, Israel, announced $33 million in venture funding for its silicon photonics solutions for cloud, data center, enterprise and HPC applications. The company's InP Laser to Silicon Photonics integration technology will provide significant value differentiation enabling superior performance to support 800 Gbps, 1.6Tbps, CPO and future products.

The funding round was led by Greenfield Partners, who join DustPhotonics' Round B investors Intel Capital, veteran entrepreneur Avigdor Willenz, and others.

In addition, the company also announced it has completed an organizational realignment to support its strategic and business direction. The company will focus its resources on silicon photonics solutions and phase out its transceivers product line. 

As part of the reorganization, Ronnen Lovinger, president of DustPhotonics, has assumed the role of CEO. Ben Rubovitch, the company's previous CEO, has stepped down and will lead the business side of the company.

"This latest investment and the organizational changes will enable us to take advantage of new business opportunities and to continue focusing on serving our customers' strategic requirements. Our disruptive silicon photonics technology addresses their key and most challenging problems, creating scalable, cost-effective silicon photonics and driving it as the mainstream solution for the Cloud and Telecom markets," said Ronnen Lovinger, CEO of DustPhotonics. "We are thrilled at the continued confidence of our investors in our strategic direction."

"With the rapid evolution of the connectivity and silicon optics markets, there is a growing need for innovative technologies. DustPhotonics is well-positioned at the forefront of silicon photonics technology development and we are excited to take part in their journey," said Yuda Doron, Managing Partner at Greenfield Partners.

http://www.dustphotonics.com 


Sunday, October 24, 2021

Anello raises $28M for silicon photonic optical gyroscope

Anello Photonics, a start-up based in Santa Clara, California, announced $28 million in Series A funding for its Silicon Photonic Optical Gyroscope (SiPhOG) sensor technology.

Anello says its novel SiPhOG replaces the discrete optical components of a traditional Fiber Optic Gyroscope (FOG) and combines high precision with greatly reduced size, weight, power and cost. The technology combines an Anello-developed on-chip waveguide manufacturing process integrated with a patented silicon photonic chip-scale gyroscope. 

Applications for the SiPhOG sensor technology could include automotive, trucking, construction, drone, aerospace, defense and consumer electronics.   

The Series A funding was led by New Legacy Ventures and included investments from Lockheed Martin Ventures, Catapult Ventures, JS Capital, Hardware Club, and individual investments from several Silicon Valley luminaries.

"With the development of the SiPhOG we are going to change the Navigation industry," says Mario Paniccia, Chief Executive Officer and co-founder of Anello. "We are bringing all the benefits of optical gyro performance onto an integrated silicon photonic circuit platform."

"By providing an independent and accurate ground truth of vehicle position, Anello's sensor and IMU system improves the reliability of Autonomous Vehicle localization while reducing the vulnerability to cyber-security threats and environmental interference common to other localization sensors," says Mike Horton, Chief Strategy Officer and co-founder of Anello.

http://www.anellophotonics.com

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

GlobalFoundries announces 45nm Silicon Photonics platform

GlobalFoundries announced a  new Silicon Photonics 45nm platform for combining RF CMOS and optical components on the same chip.

The monolithic platform includes an innovative new feature, the first micro ring resonator (MRR) optical component in 300 mm wafer technology.

GF said the new platform has passed critical technology milestones and is on track for full technology qualification by Q1 2022. The company also confirms that it is engaged with leading customers and partners on this new platform.


https://gf.com/blog/gf-innovation-moving-data-light-speed

Ayar Labs demos terabit link for Co-Packaged Optics and chip-to-chip

Ayar Labs demonstrated the industry’s first Terabit per second Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) optical link with its TeraPHY optical I/O chiplet and SuperNova multi-wavelength optical source. The demonstration shows a fully functional TeraPHY chiplet with 8 optical ports running error free without Forward Error Correction (FEC) for a total bandwidth of 1.024 Tbps and at less than 5 pJ/bit energy efficiency. “This is yet another industry...

GlobalFoundries adapts silicon photonics for quantum computing

GlobalFoundries is now manufacturing the silicon photonic and electronic chips that form the foundation of PsiQuantum's Q1 quantum computer.

PsiQuantum, a start-up based in Palo Alto, California, aims to be the first to deliver a commercially viable quantum computer with one million qubits.

PsiQuantum and GF have now demonstrated the ability to manufacture core quantum components, such as single-photon sources and single-photon detectors, with precision and in volume, using the standard manufacturing processes of GF’s semiconductor fab. The companies have also installed proprietary production and manufacturing equipment in two of GF’s 300mm fabs to produce thousands of Q1 silicon photonic chips at its facility in upstate New York, and state-of-the-art electronic control chips at its Fab 1 facility in Dresden, Germany.

PsiQuantum’s Q1 system represents breakthroughs in silicon photonics, which the company believes is the only way to scale to 1 million-plus qubits and beyond and to deliver an error-corrected, fault-tolerant, general-purpose quantum computer.

“In the past year, we have experienced a decade of technological change. Now, due to the digital transformation and the explosion of data we are faced with problems that require quantum computing to further accelerate the Renaissance of Compute,” said Amir Faintuch, senior vice president and general manager of Compute and Wired Infrastructure at GF. “PsiQuantum and GF’s partnership is a powerful combination of PsiQuantum’s photonic quantum computing expertise and GF’s silicon photonics manufacturing capability that will transform industries and technology applications across climate, energy, healthcare, materials science, and government.”

“This is a major achievement for both the quantum and semiconductor industries, demonstrating that it’s possible to build the critical components of a quantum computer on a silicon chip, using the standard manufacturing processes of a world-leading semiconductor fab,” said Pete Shadbolt, chief strategy officer and co-founder of PsiQuantum. “When we first envisioned PsiQuantum, we knew that scaling the system would be the existential question. Together with GLOBALFOUNDRIES, we have validated the manufacturing path for silicon photonics and are confident that by the middle of this decade, PsiQuantum will have completely stood up all the manufacturing lines and processes necessary to begin assembling a final machine.”

Tuesday, September 7, 2021

Keysight unveils Silicon Photonics Test System

 Keysight Technologies introduced a silicon photonics test system that enables semiconductor manufacturers to speed delivery of silicon photonics wafer production with stable and repeatable test capabilities.

The new NX5402A Silicon Photonics Test System integrated with Keysight PathWave Semiconductor Test software technology (part of Keysight PathWave Test software) delivers:

  • One-stop: Provides proven measurement technologies and direct support capabilities including integrated optical and electrical test capabilities and Keysight-developed fiber alignment and positioning system based on Keysight’s measurement science.
  • Fully automated: Eliminates manual operations with PathWave Semiconductor Test software which is compatible with Keysight’s SPECS software, enabling one-pass silicon photonics testing.
  • Volume production ready: Factory automation software, safety interlock and clean room ready features support manufacturing use, providing high throughput testing based on multi-channel optical and electrical test architecture, as well as optimized fiber alignment.
  • Demonstrated system performance: Maintains high accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility from laboratory to fabrication, delivering advanced wafer-level photonic calibration, as well as reliable performance monitoring with built-in automatic system diagnostics.

"Ahead of the growing market demand for silicon photonics, Keysight is excited to announce the first test solution for silicon photonics volume production market,” said Shinji Terasawa, vice president and general manager of Keysight’s Wafer Test Solutions group. “Our NX5402A test system is the first solution that combines Keysight’s expertise in electrical and optical measurement with Keysight’s fiber alignment and positioning system integrated by PathWave Semiconductor Test software."

http://www.keysight.com

Sunday, June 13, 2021

Silicon Photonics integration of Indium phosphide distributed feedback lasers

Sivers Photonics, imec, and ASM AMICRA successfully completed a wafer-scale integration of indium phosphide (InP) distributed feedback (DFB) lasers from Sivers’ InP100 platform onto imec’s silicon photonics platform (iSiPP). 

Using ASM AMICRA’s latest NANO flip-chip bonder tool, the InP DFB laser diodes were bonded onto a 300mm silicon photonics wafer with an alignment precision within 500nm, enabling reproducible coupling of more than 10mW of laser power into the silicon nitride waveguides on the silicon photonics wafer. Supported by its partners, imec will offer this technology later in 2021 as a prototyping service, thereby accelerating the adoption of silicon photonics in a wide range of applications from optical interconnects, over LiDAR, to biomedical sensing.

Sivers says many silicon photonic systems today still rely on external light sources, owing to the lack of efficient on‐chip light sources. Silicon itself does not emit light efficiently and, therefore, light sources made of III-V semiconductors, such as indium phosphide (InP) or gallium arsenide (GaAs), are typically implemented as separately packaged components. These off‐chip lasers often suffer from higher coupling losses, a large physical footprint and a high packaging cost.

“We’re excited to work with imec and ASM AMICRA on the development of advanced integrated photonic components. The availability of tailored InP laser sources, designed and fabricated on our InP100 manufacturing platform, will boost the adoption of silicon photonic circuits for a wide variety of commercial applications ”, says Billy McLaughlin, Sivers Photonics Managing Director.

Joris van Campenhout, Optical I/O Program Director at imec: “We are very pleased to be working with Sivers Photonics and ASM AMICRA to extend our silicon photonics platform with hybrid integrated laser sources and amplifiers. This additional functionality will enable our joint customers to develop and prototype advanced photonic integrated circuits (PICs) with capabilities well beyond what we can offer today, in key areas such as datacom, telecom and sensing.”

Dr. Johann Weinhändler, ASM AMICRA Managing Director: “Our strength in high-precision placement seamlessly complements the expertise of all partners. With automated and ultra-precise flip-chip bonding, the way to high-volume manufacturing of these hybrid assemblies is open.”

Wednesday, May 5, 2021

GlobalFoundries adapts silicon photonics for quantum computing

GlobalFoundries is now manufacturing the silicon photonic and electronic chips that form the foundation of PsiQuantum's Q1 quantum computer.

PsiQuantum, a start-up based in Palo Alto, California, aims to be the first to deliver a commercially viable quantum computer with one million qubits.

PsiQuantum and GF have now demonstrated the ability to manufacture core quantum components, such as single-photon sources and single-photon detectors, with precision and in volume, using the standard manufacturing processes of GF’s semiconductor fab. The companies have also installed proprietary production and manufacturing equipment in two of GF’s 300mm fabs to produce thousands of Q1 silicon photonic chips at its facility in upstate New York, and state-of-the-art electronic control chips at its Fab 1 facility in Dresden, Germany.

PsiQuantum’s Q1 system represents breakthroughs in silicon photonics, which the company believes is the only way to scale to 1 million-plus qubits and beyond and to deliver an error-corrected, fault-tolerant, general-purpose quantum computer.

“In the past year, we have experienced a decade of technological change. Now, due to the digital transformation and the explosion of data we are faced with problems that require quantum computing to further accelerate the Renaissance of Compute,” said Amir Faintuch, senior vice president and general manager of Compute and Wired Infrastructure at GF. “PsiQuantum and GF’s partnership is a powerful combination of PsiQuantum’s photonic quantum computing expertise and GF’s silicon photonics manufacturing capability that will transform industries and technology applications across climate, energy, healthcare, materials science, and government.”

“This is a major achievement for both the quantum and semiconductor industries, demonstrating that it’s possible to build the critical components of a quantum computer on a silicon chip, using the standard manufacturing processes of a world-leading semiconductor fab,” said Pete Shadbolt, chief strategy officer and co-founder of PsiQuantum. “When we first envisioned PsiQuantum, we knew that scaling the system would be the existential question. Together with GLOBALFOUNDRIES, we have validated the manufacturing path for silicon photonics and are confident that by the middle of this decade, PsiQuantum will have completely stood up all the manufacturing lines and processes necessary to begin assembling a final machine.”

Thursday, April 29, 2021

University of Surrey: silicon could be a photonics game-changer

Silicon is an outstanding candidate for developing new types of devices for controling multiple light beams, according to new research from the University of Surrey, suggesting new possibilities for the production of lasers and displays.

The researchers found that silicon possesses the strongest nonlinearity for manipulating laser beams – for example, changing their colour. 

Ben Murdin, co-author of the study and Professor of Physics at the University of Surrey, said: "Our finding was lucky because we weren't looking for it. We were trying to understand how a very small number of phosphorus atoms in a silicon crystal could be used for making a quantum computer and how to use light beams to control quantum information stored in the phosphorus atoms.

"We were astonished to find that the phosphorus atoms were re-emitting light beams that were almost as bright as the very intense laser we were shining on them. We shelved the data for a couple of years while we thought about proving where the beams were coming from. It's a great example of the way science proceeds by accident, and also how pan-European teams can still work together very effectively."

The research is published in the journal Light: Science and Applications

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41377-021-00509-6

https://www.surrey.ac.uk/news/study-suggests-silicon-could-be-photonics-game-changer

Thursday, April 22, 2021

EPFL develops ultralow-loss integrated photonic circuits

Researchers at the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) are developing ultralow-loss integrated photonic circuits based on silicon nitride (Si3N4), whose exceptionally low optical loss are orders of magnitude lower than that of silicon.

The work, which is led by Professor Tobias J. Kippenberg at EPFL’s School of Basic Sciences, has just been published in Nature Communications.

"Combining nanofabrication and material science, the technology is based on the photonic Damascene process developed at EPFL. Using this process, the team made integrated circuits of optical losses of only 1 dB/m, a record value for any nonlinear integrated photonic material. Such low loss significantly reduces the power budget for building chip-scale optical frequency combs (“microcombs”), used in applications like coherent optical transceivers, low-noise microwave synthesizers, LiDAR, neuromorphic computing, and even optical atomic clocks. The team used the new technology to develop meter-long waveguides on 5x5 mm2 chips and high-quality-factor microresonators. They also report high fabrication yield, which is essential for scaling up to industrial production."

“These chip devices have already been used for parametric optical amplifiers, narrow-linewidth lasers and chip-scale frequency combs”, says Dr Junqiu Liu who led the fabrication at EPFL’s Center of MicroNanoTechnology (CMi). “We are also looking forward to seeing our technology being used for emerging applications such as coherent LiDAR, photonic neural networks, and quantum computing.”

https://news.epfl.ch/news/new-tech-builds-ultralow-loss-integrated-photonic-/

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Imec demos ultrasound sensor in silicon photonics

Imec, a leading research and innovation hub in Belgium, has demonstrated an optomechanical ultrasound sensor on a silicon photonic chip that has an unprecedented sensitivity due to an innovative optomechanical waveguide.

By leveraging this high-sensitivity waveguide, Imec's 20-µm small sensor has a detection limit two orders of magnitudes better than piezoelectric elements of identical size. 

Potential clinical and biomedical applications of ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging include deep-tissue mammography and the study of vascularization or innervation of potential tumorous tissue. 

 “The sensor we have demonstrated will be a gamechanger for deep tissue imaging in otherwise non-transparent tissues such as skin or brain. For applications such as sub-cutaneous melanoma imaging or mammography, it enables a more detailed view of the tumor and vascularization around, aiding in a more detailed diagnosis,” says Xavier Rottenberg, fellow wave-based sensors and actuators at imec.

Imec said its solution is based on a highly sensitive split-rib optomechanical waveguide fabricated using new CMOS-compatible processing. The sensitivity is two orders of magnitude larger than a state-of-the-art device. A low detection limit can improve the trade-off between imaging resolution and depth for ultrasound applications, and is crucial for photoacoustic imaging, where pressures are up to three orders of magnitude lower than in conventional ultrasound imaging techniques. 

Finally, a fine-pitched (30 µm) matrix of these tiny (20 µm) sensors can be easily integrated on-chip with photonic multiplexers. This opens the possibility of new applications such as miniaturized catheters because the sensor matrices require only few optical fibers to be connected instead of one electrical connection per element in the case of piezoelectric sensors.

https://www.imec-int.com/en/press/imec-demonstrates-ultra-sensitive-small-optomechanical-ultrasound-sensor-silicon-photonics

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Rockley employs Synopsys for its silicon photonics designs

Rockley Photonics has adopted Synopsys solutions to accelerate the design and verification of silicon photonics for sensing and datacom applications. 

Specifically, Rockley is using tools from Synopsys' Photonic Solutions platform, including OptoCompiler, OptoDesigner, OptSim Circuit, RSoft Photonic Device Tools and IC Validator. Rockley plans to use Synopsys solutions to design and optimize photonic devices, create process design kits (PDKs) and tape out photonic ICs.

Rockley was an early adopter of Synopsys' OptoCompiler tool following its commercial launch in September 2020. OptoCompiler is the industry's first unified electronic and photonic design platform, combining mature and dedicated photonic technology with Synopsys' industry-proven custom and analog-mixed signal tools to enable engineers to produce and verify complex photonic IC designs quickly and accurately.

"Rockley's unique photonic chipset technology with silicon photonics at its core is driving the growth of integrated optical components in healthcare, machine vision and data communications," said Andrew Rickman, chief executive at Rockley. "The PDA platform Rockley has created by utilizing OptoCompiler allows our engineers to define, simulate, lay out and verify Photonic ICs quickly and efficiently to meet our quality and schedule goals. Synopsys' technical support has been instrumental in ensuring Rockley met its tape-out goals. We look forward to additional efficiency gains by expanding our use of Synopsys' Photonic Solutions tools."

https://www.synopsys.com/

Rockley Photonics secures $50 million in funding

 Rockley Photonics, a start-up specializing in integrated optical chips and modules, has closed an additional $50 million of growth funding from leading deep-tech VCs, strategic investors, and institutional funds including Credit Suisse backed SIG-i Capital and Applied Ventures, the venture capital arm of Applied Materials, as well as existing shareholders. To date, Rockley has raised over $225 million of financing to develop its unique silicon photonics platform.

“It is testament to the strength of our technology and emerging market opportunities that we have attracted such a preeminent list of new investors to join many of our existing shareholders in this funding round,” said Andrew Rickman, chief executive officer, Rockley Photonics. “This round provides the funding for Rockley as it moves into the next exciting growth phase and develops next generation disruptive silicon photonics powered healthcare and wellness sensors and communications products for its Tier-1 customers.”

Rockley Photonics was founded by Dr. Andrew Rickman in 2013. The company has offices in Pasadena, San Jose, Oxford, Cardiff, Cork, and Helsinki.

Teramount raises $8 million for silicon photonics

Teramount, a start-up based in Jerusalem announced $8 million in series A funding. 

Teramount is developing a Photonic-Plug for connecting optics to silicon using standard semiconductor manufacturing processes and packaging. The company says its technology offers high assembly tolerances that allow for passive alignment processes and enables high volume packaging through standard CMOS assembly lines.

The funding was led by Grove Ventures with participation from Amelia Investments and former executive VP of Intel and company Chairman, David (Dadi) Perlmutter, along with additional private investors. 

http://www.teramount.com/ 

Monday, March 15, 2021

AEPONYX secures funding for silicon photonics on MEMS

AEPONYX, a start-up based in Montreal, announced the closing of a new $10 million funding round to support the buildout its 5G product portfolio.

Participants in this funding round were Fonds Ecofuel, BDC, Investissement Québec, and Fonds Innovexport.

“We are delighted to bring innovative products to the 5G market” says Philippe Babin, CEO of AEPONYX. “The creation of our integrated photonics with MEMS products enable the

Telecom industry to advance their next-generation networks. With the 5G adoption rate eclipsing where 4G was at this point in time, we see tremendous growth potential.”

AEPONYX said its integrated photonics innovations combined with their fast-tuning and ultra-small MEMS devices are well suited for telecom applications.

“While our technology works beautifully in quantum computing, LiDAR, and sensors, we are targeting telecom as our first market vertical” says Babin.

“These optical devices, combining high data rates with being quite small in size, are exactly what the market is looking for to advance the global 5G infrastructure significantly” stated Fonds Ecofuel’s Managing Partner, Richard Cloutier.

http://www.AEPONYX.com


Monday, January 11, 2021

Intel leverages silicon photonics for Mobileye's lidar system-on-chip

Mobileye, a division of Intel, unveiled a new silicon photonics processor for frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) lidar. The new device, which was engineered at Intel’s silicon photonics fab in New Mexico, is expected to be in production by 2025. 

Mobileye envisions that AVs will use both radio- and light-based detection-and-ranging sensing.

The new software-defined imaging radar technology with 2304 channels, 100DB dynamic range and 40 DBc side lobe level that together enable the radar to build a sensing state good enough for driving policy supporting autonomous driving. 

“This is really game-changing. And we call this a photonic integrated circuit, PIC. It has 184 vertical lines, and then those vertical lines are moved through optics. Having fabs that are able to do that, that’s very, very rare. So this gives Intel a significant advantage in building these lidars,” stated Mobileye president and chief executive officer Amnon Shashua.

https://newsroom.intel.com/news-releases/ces-2021-mobileye-avs-on-move/

Tuesday, December 8, 2020

Optoscribe develops glass chip for low-loss coupling to silicon photonics

Optoscribe Ltd. introduced glass chip for low-loss coupling to silicon photonics (SiPh) grating couplers.

The new OptoCplrLT is designed to overcome fiber-to-SiPh photonic integrated circuit (PIC) coupling challenges to enable high volume automated assembly and help drive down costs. 

The device was created using Optoscribe’s proprietary high-speed laser writing technique. It features low-loss light turning curved mirrors, which are uniquely formed in the glass, to direct the light to or from SiPh grating couplers. This prevents the need for bend-tolerant fiber solutions, which are often expensive, challenging and have some significant limitations in size and profile.

To help address footprint challenges, OptoCplrLT has a low-profile interface of less than 1.5mm in height, which allows compact interface layouts that alleviate packaging constraints. It is also compatible with industry-standard materials and processes; for example, the glass chip has a coefficient of thermal expansion matched to the silicon chip, helping to maximise performance.

Russell Childs, CEO of Optoscribe, said: “With data center operators and transceiver manufacturers seeking innovative solutions to help address fiber-to-SiPh PIC coupling challenges, we are pleased to introduce OptoCplrLT™ to help meet market demands of performance, cost and volume, as well as helping to overcome such hurdles including SiPh transceiver packaging and integration.”


  

Thursday, December 3, 2020

Intel shows micro-ring modulators, all-silicon photodetectors, multi-lambda lasers

Intel showcased a number of advancements in the field of optical interconnects, advancing its long-term ambition to bring optical I/O directly into silicon packages. During a virtual Intel Labs day presentatio, the company demonstrated advances in key technology building blocks, including with light generation, amplification, detection, modulation, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) interface circuits and package integration. 

Key technology building blocks showcased:

  • Micro-ring modulators: Conventional silicon modulators take up too much area and are costly to place on IC packages. By developing micro-ring modulators, Intel has miniaturized the modulator by a factor of more than 1,000, thereby eliminating a key barrier to integrating silicon photonics onto a compute package.
  • All-silicon photodetector: For decades, the industry has believed silicon has virtually no light detection capability in the 1.3-1.6um wavelength range. Intel showcased research that proves otherwise. Lower cost is one of the main benefits of this breakthrough.
  • Integrated semiconductor optical amplifier: As the focus turns to reducing total power consumption, integrated semiconductor optical amplifiers are an indispensable technology, made possible with the same material used for the integrated laser.
  • Integrated multi-wavelength lasers: Using a technique called wavelength division multiplexing, separate wavelengths can be used from the same laser to convey more data in the same beam of light. This enables additional data to be transmitted over a single fiber, increasing bandwidth density.
  • Integration: By tightly integrating silicon photonics and CMOS silicon through advanced packaging techniques, we can gain three benefits: lower power, higher bandwidth and reduced pin count. Intel is the only company that has demonstrated integrated multi-wavelength lasers and semiconductor optical amplifiers, all-silicon photodetectors, and micro-ring modulators on a single technology platform tightly integrated with CMOS silicon. This research breakthrough paves the path for scaling integrated photonics.

Intel said these advancements will enable future architectures that are more disaggregated, with multiple functional blocks such as compute, memory, accelerators and peripherals spread throughout the entire network and interconnected via optical and software in high-speed and low-latency links.

“We are approaching an I/O power wall and an I/O bandwidth gap that will dramatically hinder performance scaling. The rapid progress Intel is making in integrated photonics will enable the industry to fully re-imagine data center networks and architectures that are connected by light. We have now demonstrated all of the critical optical technology building blocks on one silicon platform, tightly integrated with CMOS silicon. Our research on tightly integrating photonics with CMOS silicon can systematically eliminate barriers across cost, power and size constraints to bring the transformative power of optical interconnects to server packages,” stated James Jaussi, senior principal engineer and director of PHY Lab, Intel Labs.

Without such advancements, Intel warns the industry will soon reach the practical limits of electrical I/O performance - what it calls an "I/O power wall".



Thursday, November 5, 2020

Ayar Labs raises $35m for its in-package optical interconnect

Ayar Labs, a start-up based in Santa Clara, California closed $35 million in Series B financing for its in-package optical interconnect (I/O) solutions.

Ayar Labs said optical I/O (OIO) solves the major computing bottlenecks in interconnect bandwidth, power consumption, and reach.  The company is developing a monolithic in-package optical I/O (MIPO) solution for applications that require high bandwidth, low latency and power-efficient short-reach interconnects. The company's patented approach uses industry-standard silicon processing techniques to develop high speed, high density, low power optical-based interconnect “chiplets” and lasers to replace traditional electrical-based I/O. The company was founded in 2015. 

Ayar Labs publicly demonstrated its monolithic electronic photonic TeraPHY chiplet at the Supercomputing 2019 conference and is now working with select semiconductor manufacturers, OEM systems builders, and end users. 

The funding round was co-led by Downing Ventures and BlueSky Capital. New investors include Applied Ventures, LLC, Castor Ventures, Downing Ventures (U.K.), and SGInnovate (Singapore), expanding Ayar Labs’ investor base with strategic ecosystem and global investors. Existing investor participation includes BlueSky Capital, Founders Fund, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Intel Capital, Lockheed Martin Ventures, and Playground Global.

“Over the last year, we have continued to invest and grow our organization, and have demonstrated a number of technology firsts while securing additional customer and ecosystem relationships,” said Charles Wuischpard, CEO of Ayar Labs. “The investment interest from new and existing strategic and financial investors despite these difficult global times allows us to continue executing our long-range plan for making Ayar Labs Optical I/O a ubiquitous computing solution.”

http://www.ayarlabs.com

Ayar Labs has been selected as Intel’s optical I/O solution partner for their recently awarded DARPA PIPES (Photonics in Package for Extreme Scalability) project. The PIPES project aims to develop integrated optical I/O solutions co-packaged with next generation FPGA/CPU/GPU and accelerators in Multi-Chip Packages (MCP) to provide extreme data rates (input/output) at ultra-low power over much longer distances than supported by current technology....

Ayar raises $24m for TeraPHY chips, appoints CEO

Ayar Labs, a start-up based in Emeryville, California, raised $24 million in Series A funding for its work in silicon photonics for high-speed connectivity. Ayar Labs said it is pursuing a unique silicon photonics approach that uses fiber optic technology to move data between chips, rather than traditional copper pins and wires. It delivers improvements of 10x more bandwidth and 10x lower power compared to electrical interconnections. The funding...


Monday, October 12, 2020

Rockley Photonics secures $50 million in funding

 Rockley Photonics, a start-up specializing in integrated optical chips and modules, has closed an additional $50 million of growth funding from leading deep-tech VCs, strategic investors, and institutional funds including Credit Suisse backed SIG-i Capital and Applied Ventures, the venture capital arm of Applied Materials, as well as existing shareholders. To date, Rockley has raised over $225 million of financing to develop its unique silicon photonics platform.

“It is testament to the strength of our technology and emerging market opportunities that we have attracted such a preeminent list of new investors to join many of our existing shareholders in this funding round,” said Andrew Rickman, chief executive officer, Rockley Photonics. “This round provides the funding for Rockley as it moves into the next exciting growth phase and develops next generation disruptive silicon photonics powered healthcare and wellness sensors and communications products for its Tier-1 customers.”

Rockley Photonics was founded by Dr. Andrew Rickman in 2013. The company has offices in Pasadena, San Jose, Oxford, Cardiff, Cork, and Helsinki.