Showing posts with label SSD. Show all posts
Showing posts with label SSD. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Samsung launches 4 TB consumer SSD

Samsung Electronics America announced commercial availability of new consumer solid state drives (SSD) — the Samsung 860 QVO SSD — featuring up to four terabytes (TB) of storage capacity at "approachable prices." MSRP starts at $149.99 for a 1TB model.

The new drives leverage the company’s high-density 4-bit multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash architecture, SATA interface and 2.5-inch form factor. Sequential read and write speeds of up to 550 MB/s and 520 MB/s, respectively.

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Toshiba develops Ethernet-Attached Native NVMe-oF SSD

Toshiba Memory introduced an native NVMe over Fabrics (NVMe-oF) SSD for direct Ethernet access based on the NVMe-oF Specification Version 1.0.

Toshiba Memory's new SSD is powered by the Marvell 88SN2400 NVMe-oF SSD converter controller, enabling dual-port 25Gbps Ethernet connectivity of high-performance U.2 NVMe SSDs. This makes it suitable for cloud data centers and enterprise data centers.

At this week's Flash Memory Summit in Santa Clara, California, Toshiba Memory is showing an Ethernet JBOF prototype chassis that was developed and built by Aupera Technologies. The JBOF is powered by 1+1 redundant 100Gbit Ethernet switch units with dual 6x100 Gbit Ethernet uplinks, which enables 16M IOPS system performance (4KB Random Read), the fastest ever seen in the industry[2].

Monday, August 6, 2018

Samsung debuts 4-bit Consumer SSD at 4 TB

Samsung Electronics announced mass production of the first 4-bit (QLC, quad-level cell) 4-terabyte (TB) SATA solid-state drive (SSD) for consumers.

Samsung said its 4-bit 4TB QLC SATA SSD maintains performance levels at the same level as a 3-bit SSD by using a 3-bit SSD controller and TurboWrite technology, while increasing drive capacity through the use of 32 chips, all based on 64-layer fourth-generation 1Tb V-NAND. The 4-bit QLC SSD enables a sequential read speed of 540 MB/s and a sequential write speed of 520 MB/s.

“Samsung’s new 4-bit SATA SSD will herald a massive move to terabyte-SSDs for consumers,” said Jaesoo Han, executive vice president of memory sales & marketing at Samsung Electronics. “As we expand our lineup across consumer segments and to the enterprise, 4-bit terabyte-SSD products will rapidly spread throughout the entire market.”


Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Samsung intros 8TB SSD in NF1 form factor - highest capacity NVMe

-Samsung Electronics launched the industry’s highest capacity NVMe solid state drive (SSD) based on Next-generation Small Form Factor – an eight-terabyte (TB) NF1 SSD.

The new 8TB NVMe NF1 SSD has been optimized for data-intensive analytics and virtualization applications in next-generation data centers and enterprise server systems.

"By introducing the first NF1 NVMe SSD, Samsung is taking the investment efficiency in data centers to new heights," said Sewon Chun, senior vice president of Memory Marketing at Samsung Electronics. “We will continue to lead the trend toward enabling ultra-high density data centers and enterprise systems by delivering storage solutions with unparalleled performance and density levels.”

Samsung said its new SSD is built with 16 of Samsung’s 512-gigabyte (GB) NAND packages, each stacked in 16 layers of 256 gigabit (Gb) 3-bit V-NAND chips, achieving an 8TB density in an ultra-small footprint of 11cm x 3.05cm.  This is twice the capacity offered by the M.2 NVMe SSD (11cm x 2.2cm) commonly used in hyper-scale server designs and ultra-slim laptops.

The NF1 SSD features a brand new, high-performance controller that supports the NVMe 1.3 protocol and PCIe 4.0 interface, delivering sequential read speeds of 3,100 megabytes per second (MB/s) and write speeds of 2,000MB/s. These speeds are more than five times and three times that of a typical SATA SSD, respectively. Random speeds come in at 500,000 IOPS for read operations and 50,000 IOPS for writes. Utilizing the new NF1 storage solution, an enterprise server system can perform over one million IOPS in a 2U rack space, significantly enhancing the return on investment for next-generation large-scale data centers. The SSD also includes a 12GB LPDDR4 DRAM to enable faster and more energy-efficient data processing.

To ensure long-term data reliability, the NF1 NVMe SSD has been designed with an endurance level of 1.3 drive write per day (DWPD), which guarantees writing an entire 8TB of data 1.3 times a day over its three-year warranty period.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Toshiba launches lower cost SAS SSDs for servers

Toshiba introduced a new category of SAS SSDs to replace SATA SSDs in servers.

The RM5 12Gbit/s value SAS (vSAS) series feature Toshiba's BiCS FLASH TLC (3-bit-per-cell) 3D flash memory and will initially be available in capacities up to 7.68TB in a 2.5” form factor.

Toshiba said the new drives offer capacity, performance, reliability, manageability and data security advantages – at a price that obsoletes SATA SSDs.

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Toshiba debuts portable SSDs based on 64-layer 3D Flash

Toshiba Memory America introduced its XS700 Series of portable solid state drives (SSDs) offering capacity of up to 240GB.

The new drives use Toshiba's in-house 3D flash memory, 64-layer BiCS FLASH technology. The XS700 includes USB 3.1 Gen 2 support, and features the latest USB Type-CTM connector.


Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Toshiba intros NVM Express over Fabrics

Toshiba introduced its new NVMe-oF (NVM Express over Fabrics) shared accelerated storage software.

Toshiba, which is a leading provider of NVMe SSDs, said its KumoScale software enables the use of NVMe-oF to make flash storage accessible over a data center network, providing a simple and flexible abstraction of physical disks into a pool of block storage, all while preserving the high performance of direct-attached NVMe SSDs.

“The cloud was built on Direct Attached Storage (DAS) SSDs due to their low cost and ease of deployment,” noted Steve Fingerhut, senior vice president and general manager, SSD and Cloud Software business units for TMA. “However, customers are finding the fixed nature of DAS inhibits the flexibility promised by the adoption of containers and orchestration frameworks. With the availability of KumoScale software, these cloud data centers can scale and provision server and flash storage independently to accommodate unexpected and peak workloads. This increases data center efficiency and gives the agility needed to respond to new revenue opportunities.”

Monday, March 19, 2018

Toshiba delivers data center SSDs based on 64-layer 3-bit-per-cell flash

Toshiba announced its latest line-up of NVM Express (NVMe) and SATA data center solid-state drives (SSDs) based on its 64-layer 3-bit-per-cell TLC (triple-level cell) BiCS FLASH 3D flash memory. The drives feature controllers designed and developed in-house.

The two PCIe® NVMe SSDs are designed to accommodate multiple data center workload profiles, with capacities ranging from 960GB to 7.68TB in a 2.5-inch form factor. These drives deliver up to 500,000 IOPS random read, up to 35,000 IOPS random write, up to 3,140MB/s sequential read, and up to 1,980MB/s sequential write performance within a 9-14W power envelope.

The XD5 Series is a small-footprint M.2 22110 form factor SSD that supports capacities up to 3.84TB and delivers up to 2,600 MB/s sequential read and up to 890MB/s sequential write performance in a 7W power envelope. All three series are optimized for low latency and performance consistency in read-intensive workloads, for Open Compute Project (OCP) and hyper-scale/cloud applications.

The HK6-DC Series is a 6Gbits/s SATA SSD and is available in 960GB, 1.92TB and 3.84TB capacities. It delivers a performance of up to 85,000IOPS random read and 16,000IOPS random write, and up to 550 MB/s sequential read and 500MB/s sequential write.

Monday, February 19, 2018

Samsung sets new SSD capacity record -- 30.72 TB

Samsung Electronics announced mass production of t the industry’s largest capacity Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) solid state drive (SSD) to date – the 30.72 terabyte (TB).

The new PM1643 drive uses Samsung's latest V-NAND technology with 64-layer, 3-bit 512-gigabit (Gb) chips. It offers twice the capacity and performance of the previous 15.36TB high-capacity lineup introduced in March 2016.

Samsung said the density is made possible by combining 32 of the new 1TB NAND flash packages, each comprised of 16 stacked layers of 512Gb V-NAND chips. These super-dense 1TB packages allow for approximately 5,700 5-gigabyte (GB), full HD movie files to be stored within a mere 2.5-inch storage device.

Based on a 12Gb/s SAS interface, the new drive features random read and write speeds of up to 400,000 IOPS and 50,000 IOPS, and sequential read and write speeds of up to 2,100MB/s and 1,700 MB/s, respectively. These represent approximately four times the random read performance and three times the sequential read performance of a typical 2.5-inch SATA SSD.

"With our launch of the 30.72TB SSD, we are once again shattering the enterprise storage capacity barrier, and in the process, opening up new horizons for ultra-high capacity storage systems worldwide," said Jaesoo Han, executive vice president, Memory Sales & Marketing Team at Samsung Electronics. "Samsung will continue to move aggressively in meeting the shifting demand toward SSDs over 10TB and at the same time, accelerating adoption of our trail-blazing storage solutions in a new age of enterprise systems."

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Flash Memory Summit – big changes in non-volatile memory - part 2

Over the past year, we’ve seen that HDD capacity increases have plateaued. Spinning disks have been surpassed in storage capacity by SSDs. Performance comparisons between the two is not even a topic of debate. For CIOs, the deployment of flash storage arrays is easy and offers an immediate boost in IOPs for critical applications. More importantly, all the innovation in new drive development has shifted to flash. We are now seeing many approaches being tried in the market to boost SSD performance even further, to scale up to new drive capacities and new array architectures, to adopt new form factors for better rack-scale integration, and increase manufacturing volume to finally meet market demand.

In the first part of this article, we covered Samsung’s rapid progression with 3-D NAND technology. With the arrival of its 5th generation 3D NAND next year we will see 2.5” SSDs soar into the 128TB range. The company says its on-track for 5 more generations of 3-D NAND in the coming decade. In this second part of the article, we’ll look at innovations from another giant, Intel, which has also set its sights on bringing non-volatile memory technologies to the forefront of server, system and data centre design, as well as developments from Nimbus Data and the Gen-Z consortium.

Intel’s non-volatile memory advancements

Intel began shipping its first SSDs as early as 2008 and has been on a continuous improvement path ever since. In 2010, Intel and Micron Technology entered into a partnership focused on NAND flash memory. In 2015, Intel and Micron announced 3D XPoint technology, which was described as the first new memory category since the introduction of NAND flash in 1989, with promises to be up to 1,000 times faster and up to 1,000 times greater endurance than NAND, while being cheaper than DRAM and non-volatile. Intel then adopted the "Optane" brand for products based on thistechnology, while Micron adopted the QuantX brand. Optane is fundamentally different from NAND and uses a combination of unique Intel memory + storage controllers, Intel interconnect IP, and Intel software.

Introducing the memory ruler

Intel's big news at last week's Flash Memory Summit was its new "ruler" form factor for SSD. Instead of the traditional, 2.5" or 3.5" rectangular box for disk drives, Intel's ruler is a long, thin box designed to slide in to a 1" server chassis, plugging in via a PCIe interface at the end of the ruler. It is a slick design. Apart from looking better, the long, thin shape dissipates heat easier. Intel showed a 1” RU server chassis accommodating 32 of these SSD rulers, creating up to 1 petabyte of storage. Intel could offer Optane SSDs and/or 3D NAND SSDs in this form factor.

It’s been a while since a new storage drive format gained widespread acceptance. Intel will need to bring its new form factor to standardization, perhaps via the Open Compute Project, although this was not confirmed. The ruler design should prove to be particularly useful in hyperscale data centres, where plug-n-play convenience is especially useful when 100s of thousands of servers need to be maintained. Intel also noted that its ruler form factor could be used for plug-in accelerators, perhaps FPGA boards optimized for specific functions. No timeline was given for when the ruler might enter the market.

Intel and Attala Systems also announced an FPGA-based accelerated RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE) networking solution designed to serve as high-performance, composable storage infrastructure with features such as self-learning orchestration and provisioning capabilities. The idea is to create an adaptable storage infrastructure that is essentially an elastic block storage (EBS) solution, accelerated. Attala Systems is a start-up based in San Jose, California that was founded by Sujith Arramreddy, who previously co-founded ServerEngines (acquired by Emulex for $250 million in 2010) and ServerWorks (acquired by Broadcom for $1.4 billion in 2001). Attala's CEO is Taufik Ma, who previously was co-GM of Intel's Server System business unit before leaving for a storage/networking start-up. Nimbus Data sees 500 TB SSDs by 2020

Nimbus Data is a privately-held develop of all-flash arrays based in Irvine, California. The company observes that 40 million nearline/high-capacity HDDs are shipped per year, and all of them use the 3.5” form factor. At Flash Memory Summit, Nimbus Data introduced a software and multiprocessor solution for OEMs developing next-generation solid state drives for data centres. Whereas conventional SSDs are based on a single flash controller, Nimbus ExaDrive is based on a distributed multiprocessor architecture. Inside an ExaDrive-powered SSD, multiple ultra-low power ASICs exclusively handle error correction, while an intelligent flash processor provides wear-leveling and capacity management in software. Nimbus sees an opportunity for its ExaDrive being used in super capacity SSDs that let data centers rip-andreplace HDDs with flash. ExaDrive supports the standard SAS interface and is optimized to fully utilize the volume of the 3.5” form factor.

Nimbus said its ExaDrive is used by Viking Technology and SMART Modular Technologies in 50 TB and 25 TB SSDs for cloud infrastructure, technical computing, and digital content storage. The company predicts that its ExaDrive software-defined architecture will enable SSDs as large as 500 TB by the year 2020, achieving up to 600 petabytes in a single rack. This represents a 50x increase over what is possible with HDDs today. “ExaDrive’s software-defined multiprocessor architecture for SSDs delivers a game-changing leap forward in capacity, density, and energy efficiency that HDDs will never be able to recoup,” stated Thomas Isakovich, CEO and Founder of Nimbus Data. “ExaDrive broadens the appeal of flash memory to tier 2 and nearline use cases, enabling flash to become the dominant data center storage media.”

Gen-Z consortium targets data centres

The Gen-Z Consortium is a vendor-led group that is developing an open systems interconnect with memory semantic access to data and devices via direct-attached, switched or fabric topologies. Its major members include AMD, ARM, Broadcom, Cray, Dell EMC, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Huawei, IDT, Micron, Samsung, SK hynix, and Xilinx. At this year’s Flash Memory Summit, the group had planned it’s the Gen-Z multi-vendor technology demonstration, connecting compute, memory, and I/O devices. Despite the unfortunate fire at a vendor booth on the opening day of the event, the demo was still able to occur in a nearby meeting room.

The demo showed FPGA-based Gen-Z adapters connecting compute nodes to memory pools through a Gen-Z switch, creating a fabric connecting multiple server vendors and a variety of memory vendors. Such a highperformance and scalable fabric/interconnect could be implemented in future data centres. The demo also featured a scalable prototype connector defined by the Gen-Z Consortium, running at 112 giga-transfers/sec. “We are excited to showcase the first technology demonstration of Gen-Z that includes solutions from multiple member companies, including a variety of servers, memory and I/O devices, all connected with a Gen-Z fabric,” said Kurtis Bowman, President of the Gen-Z Consortium. “The consortium continues to meet the planned development schedule and we expect to see initial Gen-Z products in the 2019-2020 timeframe.”

http://genzconsortium.org/

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Kingston Ships Next-Generation Data Center PCIe SSD

Kingston Digital announced shipment of its Data Center PCIe 1000 SSD, a Flash-based drive aggregates four 8-channel controllers together to deliver up to 1.25 million IOPS from a single SSD.

The PCIe-based NVMe Gen. 3.0 x8 SSD is targeted toward high-performance data center applications such as database optimization, online transaction processing (OLTP), software defined storage, virtual desktop infrastructure and virtualization.

“We are proud to introduce the next generation of PCIe storage and performance for data centers with our new DCP1000 PCIe NVMe SSD,” said Ariel Perez, SSD business manager, Kingston. “This drive is a game changer among data center technology solutions. DCP1000 SSD enables IT professionals to quickly and economically scale and improve performance without replacing an entire storage system or server infrastructure.”

Some key specs:

High capacity: With up to 3.2TB1, DCP1000 is a high-capacity NVMe solid-state drive.
Power failure protection: DCP1000 offers enterprise-class power failure protection to maximize uptime.
Interface: Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe™) PCle Gen 3.0 x8 Lanes
Capacities1: 800GB, 1.6TB, 3.2TB
Sequential Read/Write2:
800GB: 6,800 / 5,000MB/s
1.6TB: 6,800 / 6,000MB/s
3.2TB: 6,800 / 6,000MB/s

Steady-State Random 4k Read/Write2:
800GB: 900,000 / 145,000 IOPS
1.6TB: 1,100,000 / 200,000 IOPS
3.2TB: 1,000,000 / 180,000 IOPS

Latency: (Typical) Read/Write 100us / 30us3
Endurance: Terabytes Written (Whole Drive)4
800GB: 748TB5
1.6TB: 1500TB5
3.2TB: 2788TB5

http://www.kingston.com

Monday, August 8, 2016

Samsung Claims Top Spot in Enterprise SSDs - Key Role in Data Centers

Samsung Electronics is now the world’s number one supplier of enterprise solid state drives used in corporate data centers, according to a number of analyst firms cited by the company:

The IDC report, Worldwide Solid State Storage Quarterly Update CY 1Q16, shows that Samsung rose to the leader position in Enterprise SSD sales in Q1 of this year, with the IDC data showing Samsung at 32.4 percent compared to the second place finisher with 16.9 percent. This shows a sharp upswing in Enterprise SSD sales from Q4 of 2015 when Samsung was in a virtual dead heat with its closest competitor with about a 22 percent market share. For the year 2015, IDC showed Samsung with a 20.6 percent share.

Analyst firm Forward Insights showed a slightly larger market lead for Samsung, reporting that in the first quarter of 2016, Samsung easily led the enterprise SSD market with a 34 percent share, well above the 19 percent share of the nearest competitor. This compares with a second place Samsung finish with 25 percent of Enterprise SSD market share in Q4 of 2015, according to the analyst firm.

TrendFocus charted Samsung with a 45 percent leadership position in Enterprise SSD market share for the first quarter of this year, rising from a second place finish with 26 percent share in the fourth quarter of last year.

“The enterprise market is a top Samsung memory focus, so it should come as no surprise that we have now also taken the lead in supplying SSDs to the enterprise, after years of leadership in the client market,” said Jim Elliott, corporate vice president, Memory Marketing, Samsung Semiconductor, Inc. “Our securing the No. 1 position in enterprise SSDs has been supported by market leading advances in flash density and performance, and continued success with our 3D V-NAND manufacturing and state-of-the-art controllers,” he added.

http://www.samsung.com


Samsung Ships 512 GB NVMe SSD


Samsung Electronics has begun mass producing the industry’s first NVMe PCIe solid state drive (SSD) in a single ball grid array (BGA) package, for use in next-generation PCs and ultra-slim notebook PCs. The package that contains all essential SSD components including NAND flash memory, DRAM and controller.  The new SSD is 20mm x 16mm x 1.5mm and weighs only about one gram (an American dime by comparison weighs 2.3 grams). The single-package...

Samsung Ships its 15.36TB SSD


Samsung Electronics began shipping the industry’s largest solid state drive (SSD) – the “PM1633a,” a 15.36 terabyte (TB) drive. The new 15.36TB SSD is based on a 12Gb/s Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) interface, for use in enterprise storage systems. Samsung said the unprecedented 15.36TB of data storage on a single SSD is enabled by combining 512 of its 256Gb V-NAND memory chips. The 256Gb dies are stacked in 16 layers to form a single 512GB package,...

rage (UFS) 2.0 standa

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Samsung Ships 512 GB NVMe SSD

Samsung Electronics has begun mass producing the industry’s first NVMe PCIe solid state drive (SSD) in a single ball grid array (BGA) package, for use in next-generation PCs and ultra-slim notebook PCs.

The package that contains all essential SSD components including NAND flash memory, DRAM and controller.  The new SSD is 20mm x 16mm x 1.5mm and weighs only about one gram (an American dime by comparison weighs 2.3 grams). The single-package SSD’s volume is approximately a hundredth of a 2.5” SSD or HDD, and its surface area is about a fifth of an M.2 SSD.

http://www.samsung.com

Thursday, April 14, 2016

Digital Ocean Secures $130 Million for Cloud Buildout

DigitalOcean, a start-up based in New York City, secured a $130 million credit facility to continue its mission of building a next generation cloud for scaling startups and software defined businesses.

DigitalOcean offers SSD-enabled cloud servers with simplified pricing tiers.

The company said that over the past two years it has expanded its registered customer base from 253,000 to 708,000 users, who have launched over 13 million cloud servers. The credit facilities will be used to purchase equipment in order to continue its global expansion and support increasing demand.

"We are delighted with the outcome of our credit facility. It complements the $83 million Series B equity financing that we closed in June 2015 and our strong cash flows and balance sheet in pursuing long-term growth opportunities," commented Brian Cohen, Chief Financial Officer of DigitalOcean.

http://www.digitalocean.com


DigitalOcean Raises $83 Million for Cloud Hosting

DigitalOcean, a start-up based in New York City, announced $83 million in Series B funding for its cloud infrastructure for developers of websites and applications.

DigitalOcean offers simple cloud hosting with all servers built on powerful Hex Core machines with dedicated ECC Ram and RAID SSD storage. The company notes that more than 6 million Droplets (cloud servers) have been deployed on DigitalOcean by more than 500,000 developers to date.

The funding round was led by Access Industries, with participation from Andreessen Horowitz.

https://www.digitalocean.com/features/technology/

Monday, March 14, 2016

Video: Infinite Storage Bandwidth

We're facing a really big problem in shared storage because CPU bandwidth is not keeping up with network bandwidth or SSD bandwidth, says Fritz Kruger, Engineering Fellow and Chief Hardware Architectu for SanDisk System and Software Solutions.

This video looks at the widening performance gap between network, storage and DRAM bandwidth.

YouTube: https://youtu.be/JHcIVhq199Q




Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Seagate Demos 10 GB/s SSD -- Fastest to Date

Seagate Technology unveiled a production-ready unit of the fastest single solid-state drive (SSD) demonstrated to date, with throughput performance of 10 gigabytes per second (GB/s).

The early unit meets Open Compute Project (OCP) specifications, making it ideal for hyperscale data centers looking to adopt the fastest flash technology with the latest and most sustainable standards.

The 10GB/s unit, which is expected to be released this summer, is more than 4GB/s faster than the previous fastest-industry SSD on the market.

“Your data is only as good as how easily you can access it and put it to use,” said Brett Pemble, Seagate’s general manager and vice president of SSD Products. “Seagate is committed to providing the full spectrum of technologies to help meet the diverse needs of organizations so they can unlock this value. Whether for consumer cloud or business applications, this SSD will help improve on demands for fast access to information, where split seconds drive incremental value gains.”

http://www.seagate.com

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Samsung Ships its 15.36TB SSD

Samsung Electronics began shipping the industry’s largest solid state drive (SSD) – the “PM1633a,” a 15.36 terabyte (TB) drive.

The new 15.36TB SSD is based on a 12Gb/s Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) interface, for use in enterprise storage systems. Samsung said the unprecedented 15.36TB of data storage on a single SSD is enabled by combining 512 of its 256Gb V-NAND memory chips. The 256Gb dies are stacked in 16 layers to form a single 512GB package, with a total of 32 NAND flash packages in the 15.36TB drive. Samsung’s 3rd generation, 256-gigabit (Gb) V-NAND technology which stacks cell-arrays in 48 layers.

Because the PM1633a comes in a 2.5-inch form factor, enterprise storage managers can fit twice as many of the drives in a standard 19-inch, 2U rack, compared to an equivalent 3.5-inch storage drive.

http://www.samsung.com

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

#MWC16- Samsung Spins 256GB Flash for High-End Phones

Samsung Electronics has begun mass production of the first 256-gigabyte (GB) embedded memory based on the Universal Flash Storage (UFS) 2.0 standard.  The newly introduced embedded memory, which is targeted at high-end mobile devices, exceeds that of a typical SATA-based SSD for PCs.

The new Samsung UFS memory is based on the company’s most advanced V-NAND flash memory chips and a specially-designed high-performance controller. The UFS memory handles up to 45,000 and 40,000 input/output operations per second (IOPS) for random reading and writing respectively, over two times faster than the 19,000 and 14,000 IOPS of the previous generation of UFS memory.

For sequential reading, the 256GB UFS takes advantage of two lanes of data transfer to move data at up to 850MB/s, which is nearly twice as fast as a typical SATA-based SSD used in PCs. In terms of sequential writing, it supports up to 260MB/s, which is approximately three times faster than high-performance external micro SD cards.

“By providing high-density UFS memory that is nearly twice as fast as a SATA SSD for PCs, we will contribute to a paradigm shift within the mobile data storage market,” said Joo Sun Choi, Executive Vice President, Memory Sales and Marketing, Samsung Electronics. “We are determined to push the competitive edge in premium storage line-ups – OEM NVMe SSDs, external SSDs, and UFS – by moving aggressively to enhance performance and capacity in all three markets.”

http://www.samsung.com

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Intel Launches Data Center SSDs with NVMe + 8 Lanes of PCIe 3.0

Intel introduced its highest performance SSDs for the data center to date.

The Intel SSD DC P3608 Series with NVMe leverages eight lanes of PCIe 3.0 to eliminate bottlenecks.

The drives feature a unique NVMe dual-controller architecture that allows efficient scaling with Intel Xeon Processors with multiple cores, evenly distributing the IO of up to 850K random read IOPS while the PCIe 3.0 x8 link enables data transfers of 5 GB/s.

The Intel SSD DC P3608 Series is available in capacities of 1.6TB, 3.2TB, and 4TB in a single PCIe 3.0 x8 low-profile add-in-card.

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/solid-state-drives/solid-state-drives-dc-p3608-series.html

Monday, August 10, 2015

Samsung's 3D V-NAND Flash Memory Enters Mass Production

Samsung Electronics has begun mass production of the industry’s first 256-gigabit, three-dimensional (3D) Vertical NAND (V-NAND) flash memory based on 48 layers of 3-bit multi-level-cell (MLC) arrays for use in solid state drives (SSDs).

Samsung’s new 256Gb 3D V-NAND flash doubles the density of conventional 128Gb NAND flash chips. In addition to enabling 32 gigabytes (256 gigabits) of memory storage on a single die, the new chip will also easily double the capacity of Samsung’s existing SSD line-ups, and provide an ideal solution for multi-terabyte SSDs. A 48-layer 3-bit MLC 256Gb V-NAND flash chip delivers more than a 30 percent reduction in power compared to a 32-layer, 3-bit MLC, 128Gb V-NAND chip, when storing the same amount of data.

“With the introduction of our 3rd generation V-NAND flash memory to the global market, we can now provide the best advanced memory solutions, with even higher efficiency based on improved performance, power utilization and manufacturing productivity, thereby accelerating growth of the high-performance and the high-density SSD markets,” said Young-Hyun Jun, President of the Memory Business at Samsung Electronics. “By making full use of Samsung V-NAND’s excellent features, we will expand our premium-level business in the enterprise and data center market segments, as well as in the consumer market, while continuing to strengthen our strategic SSD focus.”

http://www.samsung.com

See also