Showing posts with label Record. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Record. Show all posts

Saturday, April 8, 2017

NTT Carriers One Petabit per Second over Single Fiber over 200 km

NTT has demonstrated a record inline optical amplified transmission of 1 petabit (1000 terabit) per second over a 205.6 km single strand of 32-core (light paths) optical fiber.

The experimental system used 32-core fiber with a new arrangement of cores to reduce inter-core light leakage, a fan-in/fan-out (FI/FO) device to couple light into the multi-core fiber, along with new digital coherent optical transmission technology. The result aws 31.3 Tbit/s capacity per core (680 Gbit/s per wavelength x 46 wavelength channels).  Multiplied by 32 cores, adn the total transmission capacity exceeded the petabit milestone.

The test was conducted in collaboration with the Technical University of Denmark, Fujikura Ltd., Hokkaido University, the University of Southampton and Coriant.

The transmission occurred within a single optical amplifier bandwidth (C-band), which is half the bandwidth used in a previous experiment the used C-band + L-band. NTT said its research indicates that it is potentially possible to carry 1 petabit per second over 1000 km, which is approximately the distance between major cities both in Japan and in Europe.


http://www.ntt.co.jp/news2017/1703e/170323a.html#b2



Monday, September 19, 2016

Nokia Bell Labs, T-Labs and TU Munich Hit 1 Tbps w New Modulation

Nokia Bell Labs, Deutsche Telekom T-Labs and the Technical University of Munich have demonstrated a new modulation technique that achieved a net 1 Terabit per second transmission rate -  close to the theoretical maximum information transfer rate of that channel and thus approaching the Shannon Limit of the fiber link.

The trial, which was carried out as part of the Safe and Secure European Routing (SASER) project, used the optical fiber network of Deutsche Telekom. Bell Labs is calling the novel novel modulation approach "Probabilistic Constellation Shaping (PCS)."  It uses quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) formats to achieve higher transmission capacity over a given channel to significantly improve the spectral efficiency of optical communications. PCS modifies the probability with which constellation points - the alphabet of the transmission - are used. Traditionally, all constellation points are used with the same frequency. PCS cleverly uses constellation points with high amplitude less frequently than those with lesser amplitude to transmit signals that, on average, are more resilient to noise and other impairments. This allows the transmission rate to be tailored to ideally fit the transmission channel, delivering up to 30 percent greater reach.

Marcus Weldon, president Nokia Bell Labs & Nokia CTO, said:  "Future optical networks not only need to support orders of magnitude higher capacity, but also the ability to dynamically adapt to channel conditions and traffic demand. Probabilistic Constellation Shaping offers great benefits to service providers and enterprises by enabling optical networks to operate closer to the Shannon Limit to support massive datacenter interconnectivity and provide the flexibility and performance required for modern networking in the digital era."

https://www.bell-labs.com/

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

NEC Carries Record 34.9 Tbps over 6,300km of Fiber

NEC has demonstrated a transmission capacity of 34.9 terabits per second (Tbps on a single optical fiber over a distance greater than 6,300 km.

The results, which were presented earlier this year at OFC 2016 in California, broke previous the spectral efficiency record for transoceanic transmission of 7.1 bit/s/Hz, achieving 8.3 bit/s/Hz using the C-band spectrum. This is a 16.9% improvement on the previous record.

NEC said this level of capacity comes very close to the Shannon limit, which is the fundamental spectral efficiency limit of optical communications. In fact, the demonstration came within 0.5 decibels (dB) of the theoretical maximum value.

"We are proud to have come so close to Shannon's cornerstone of communication theory," said Toru Kawauchi, General Manager of the Submarine Network Division at NEC Corporation. "NEC's research and development teams will continue to explore the limits of even greater subsea capacity, flexibility, and cost-effectiveness."

http://www.nec.com/en/press/201606/global_20160613_02.html

Technical University of Denmark Hits 43 Tbps Optical Transmission

Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) have achieved an optical transmission speed of 43 terabits per second ( 43 Tbps) using a single laser and a single fiber.

The demonstration used a new type of optical fiber (developed by NTT) that contains seven cores (glass threads) instead of the single core used in standard fiber.

DTU noted that its researchers have previously helped achieve the highest combined data transmission speed in the world—an incredible 1 petabit per second—although this involved using hundreds of lasers.

http://www.dtu.dk/english/News/Nyhed?id=bed76c33-c9da-4214-91f3-c9ed3f8a0e24


Thursday, May 26, 2016

BT Tests 5.6 Tbps Optical Transmission Speed

BT and Huawei demonstrated speeds of 2 Tbps over a live core network spanning 700km between London and Dublin.

Separately, BT also announced today that it has successfully transmitted speeds of 5.6Tbps over a single optical fibre running on its trial network between the BT Labs in Adastral Park and the BT Tower in London, beating the previous record of 3 Tbps set in 2014.

Key technical facts about the trials:

  • The 2Tbps trials exploit commercial flexible grid hardware and real-time flexible rate 64GBaud transponders. 64GBaud optical technology runs at twice the electrical speed of current deployed core optical network optical signals and is one of the key enablers for high-speed, long reach optical transmission.
  • The live trials were conducted over a 727km commercial flexible grid optical core link between London and Dublin, based on Huawei’s OSN 9800/8800 and iManager U2000 platforms, carrying live 40/100G customer traffic. The link includes a 133km long unrepeatered submarine cable link from Dublin to Holyhead.
  • The trials demonstrate, for the first time, the successful operation of real-time 64GBaud flexible-rate transponders allowing all-optical, long reach (unregenerated) superchannel transmission, with low latency.
  • In addition, by exploiting flexible rate transponders, BT successfully demonstrated fast capacity turn up (or network upgrade) equivalent to ~2Tbps in one minute.
  • BT and Huawei also successfully demonstrated a record real-time 5.6Tbps optical superchannel over a closed loop network running between the BT Tower and Adastral Park. This comprised 28 x 200Gb/s (64GBaud/QPSK) sub-channels, bundled together to provide combined capacity, achieving highest capacity and spectral efficiency.

Howard Watson, CEO of BT Technology, Service & Operations, said: “BT scientists built the first commercial single mode optical fibre link back in 1984 and the BT Labs remain at the forefront of photonics research more than thirty years later. The core network is the superhighway of the internet. It’s important that our core networks keep pace with the growth in bandwidth demands driven by take-up of high-speed fibre broadband, HD content, 4G smartphones and tablets and in the future, 5G services. So we’re investing in our core, as well as in high-speed access technology such as fibre broadband, to make sure there is no capacity crunch and deliver the best possible speeds to customers.

http://www.btplc.com

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Huawei Marine Carries Unrepeatered 100G for 627km

Huawei Marine has demonstrated a 100G ultra-long unrepeatered system achieving a record transmission distance of up to 627km in a laboratory test in Beijing. The system makes use of Huawei’s advanced 100G technology, Enhanced Raman Amplifier and ROPA (remote optical pump amplifier) technology. Huawei’s 100G transmission combines Combining PDM BPSK modulation, ODSP and third-generation soft decision technology.

Ultra-long unrepeatered systems promise easier installation, lower maintenance or overall lower cost.

“Huawei Marine is committed to investing in the development of high-performance technology,” said Zhang Shigui, Vice President of Technology, Huawei Marine. “This breakthrough in unrepeatered system marks another milestone for Huawei Marine and further demonstrates our technical expertise and ability to deliver innovative solutions to address our customer needs”

http://www.huaweimarine.com/

Thursday, February 11, 2016

Tokyo Institute of Tech and Fujitsu Labs Develop Very High-speed Wireless Transceiver

Tokyo Institute of Technology and Fujitsu Laboratories have developed a CMOS wireless transceiver chip that can process signals at high speeds with little loss across a broad range of frequencies, from 72 to 100 gigahertz (GHz). The researchers report record wireless speeds of 56 Gbps over a distance of 10cm.

Some highlights:

  • The high-speed wireless transceiver technologies use the millimeter-waveband (30-300 GHz), where there are few competing wireless applications, and which are capable of large-capacity communications. 
  • Tokyo Institute of Technology developed a technology for broadband, low-loss transceiver circuits in which data signals are split in two, with each converted to different frequency ranges, and then recombined (Figure 2). Each signal is modulated into a band 10-GHz wide, with the low-band occupying the 72-82 GHz range, and the high-band occupying the 89-99 GHz range. 
  • The technology enables modulation on an ultra-wideband signal of 20 GHz, with low noise and a similar range in the ratio between input and output power as existing 10 GHz band methods, which results in high-quality signal transmissions.
  • Fujitsu Laboratories and Tokyo Institute of Technology developed an interface between the circuit board and waveguide that uses a specially designed pattern of interconnects on the printed circuit board to adjust the impedance for the ultra-wideband range, enabling loss in the desired frequency range to be greatly reduced.

http://www.fujitsu.com/global/about/resources/news/press-releases/2016/0201-02.html

Saturday, August 2, 2014

Technical University of Denmark Hits 43 Tbps Optical Transmission

Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) have achieved an optical transmission speed of 43 terabits per second ( 43 Tbps) using a single laser and a single fiber.

The demonstration used a new type of optical fiber (developed by NTT) that contains seven cores (glass threads) instead of the single core used in standard fiber.

DTU noted that its researchers have previously helped achieve the highest combined data transmission speed in the world—an incredible 1 petabit per second—although this involved using hundreds of lasers.

http://www.dtu.dk/english/News/Nyhed?id=bed76c33-c9da-4214-91f3-c9ed3f8a0e24

See also