Showing posts with label Quantum. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Quantum. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 17, 2020

NEC teams with D-Wave on Quantum development

NEC Corporation has formed a partnership with D-Wave Systems and invested $10 million in the firm, which is known for its pioneering work in quantum computing systems, software and services.

The two companies will work together on the development of hybrid quantum/classical technologies and services that combine the best features of classical computers and quantum computers; the development of new hybrid applications that make use of those services; and joint marketing and sales go-to-market activities to promote quantum computing.

Under the partnership, the companies will build on the existing hybrid tools of D-Wave's Leap quantum cloud service to develop hybrid services capable of solving large combinatorial optimization problems at high speed, by combining D-Wave’s quantum annealing technology with NEC’s supercomputers. The newly developed services will be available to customers of both companies through Leap.

In addition, the companies will apply D-Wave's collection of over 200 early customer applications to six markets identified by NEC, such as finance, manufacturing and distribution. The two companies will also explore the possibility of enabling the use of NEC's supercomputers on D-Wave’s Leap quantum cloud service.

“We are very excited to collaborate with D-Wave. This announcement marks the latest of many examples where NEC has partnered with universities and businesses to jointly develop various applications and technologies. Our work with D-Wave has a special focus on developing hybrid quantum computing services and enhancing related hybrid quantum software applications, accelerating commercial-grade quantum solutions globally. This collaborative agreement aims to leverage the strengths of both companies to fuel quantum application development and business value today,” said Motoo Nishihara, Executive Vice President and CTO, NEC.

"Japan has long been a global leader in quantum computing, from the advent of quantum annealing to today's continued commercial research and development. By combining efforts with NEC, we believe we can bring even more quantum benefit to the entire Japanese market that is building business-critical hybrid quantum applications in both the public and private sectors," said Alan Baratz, CEO of D-Wave. "NEC is a proven pioneer of world-changing technology, and we're united in the belief that hybrid software and systems are the future of commercial quantum computing. Our joint collaboration will further the adoption of quantum computing in the Japanese market and beyond."

http://www.dwavesys.com

Monday, June 1, 2020

OIDA Quantum Photonics Roadmap: Every Photon Counts

A newly released Quantum Photonics Roadmap: Every Photon Counts, which was produced by OSA Industry Development Associates (OIDA) in collaboration with Corning, clarifies the applications and timing for quantum technologies and specifies improvements in optics and photonics components needed to enable commercialization. It covers the three major application areas: quantum sensing and metrology, quantum communications and quantum computing.

Commercialization of products such as quantum sensors for GPS-free navigation and field-deployable quantum repeaters for communications will be significant milestones in an emerging market but more investments in product engineering are critical. Lower SWAP-C devices would enable progress, for example, across multiple sensing categories, and integration of these systems onto photonic chips is a critical path to doing so. While some integration is possible today, more on-chip functionality (e.g., sources, modulators, switches) is needed.

“While the field still needs breakthroughs in quantum science, such as a quantum repeater, the photonics technology already largely exists for laboratory experiments,” says Tom Hausken, senior industry advisor, The Optical Society (OSA). “The product engineering -- low size, weight, power and cost -- is missing, or it is applied to a specific customer application, without benefit to the rest of the field. The need is analogous to the talent shortage, not just with scientists, but with engineers in photonics, microwave and control electronics, packaging and cryogenics who have the specialized expertise to bring the technology to market.”



Although the quantum technology market is still in the early stages, the optics and photonics community already supplies critical enabling components to research and development labs in the near term to ensure progress. OIDA estimates sales of optics and photonics for lab equipment used by quantum researchers at about US$100 million per year. The commercial market for quantum end-use products is expected to rise to billions of dollars by 2030.

“The real impact of quantum technology is what it can do, which could be far greater than the market for the technology itself,” Hausken adds. “The fear of missing out (FOMO) on that impact on competitiveness and security is driving funding in quantum research, which OIDA estimates at about US$2 billion annually.”

The public and private sectors worldwide are making multi-year investments in quantum technologies with an end-goal of market ready applications. In the U.S., the National Quantum Initiative Act, a multi-agency plan, proposes US$1.2 billion in funding for quantum information science over five-years. The European Union’s Quantum Flagship program is budgeted at 1 billion euros over a ten-year period.

Investments in the product engineering of quantum technology could support classical applications as well. For example, investments in lower loss integrated photonics and single-photon detectors could yield benefits in classical optical communications and low-light imaging, respectively. Integrated photonics offers many promising solutions for quantum technology, at a time when it offers multiple solutions in other fields.

To read the full report, visit http://www.osa.org/OIDARoadmap

Friday, May 15, 2020

SK Telecom shows 5G phone with quantum random number generator

SK Telecom, together with Samsung Electronics and ID Quantique, demonstrated the first 5G smartphone equipped with a quantum random number generator chipset.

The Samsung Galaxy A Quantum with integrated quantum-enhanced cryptography will allow customers to experience advanced security through two-factor authentication for T-ID, biometric authentication-based payment for SK Pay and mobile e-certification service.

“Securing mobiles phones has become a top priority for mobile operators, who are also looking to generate new revenues,” Says Grégoire Ribordy, co-founder and CEO of ID Quantique. “With its compact size and low power consumption, our latest Quantis QRNG chip can be embedded in any smartphone, to ensure trusted authentication and encryption of sensitive information. It will bring a new level of security to the mobile phone industry.”

  • Last year, SK Telecom and ID Quantique were awarded quantum communication network-building projects in the U.S. and Europe (EU), and applied QRNG to SK Telecom’s 5G authentication center (AuC) for the first time in the world. Going forward, SK Telecom will expand its footprint in the quantum security business by integrating QRNGs to more devices and networks.



Tuesday, May 12, 2020

ADVA supports Quantum-Secure VPN (QuaSiModO) project

ADVA is playing a key role in a unique research initiative extending post-quantum security to VPN networks.

The company has supplied its ADVA FSP 150 with ConnectGuard Ethernet encryption for the Quantum-Secure VPN Modules and Operation Modes (QuaSiModO) project, which is being conducted by the Fraunhofer Institute of Applied and Integrated Security, the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich and genua GmbH. Funding is provided by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.

The QuaSiModO project is testing new quantum-resistant algorithms in the packet domain. The goal is to develop viable security solutions that can protect Layer 2 and 3 data against all forms of cyberattack, including those from quantum computers.

“As part of the QuaSiModO project, we’re continuing to drive innovation in future-proof cryptography. This initiative extends comprehensive post-quantum security to VPNs and enables businesses and government institutions to protect their data from tomorrow’s attacks,” said Jörg-Peter Elbers, SVP, advanced technology, ADVA. “Together with our partners, we’re ensuring that network security technology doesn’t fall behind in the computing power race. Our role in the project combines our experience with transport layer post-quantum security and our proven expertise when it comes to encrypting Carrier Ethernet connectivity. We’re helping to create a solution able to protect packet services today and ready to be upgraded later to comply with emerging specifications from standards bodies such as the USA’s National Institute of Standards and Technology.”

“When quantum computers emerge, they’ll be able to quickly crack complex problems that would take today’s most powerful supercomputers many years to solve. That’s why enterprises, governments and communication service providers are looking to leverage security technology built on quantum-safe algorithms,” commented Alexander von Gernler, head of research, genua GmbH. “For a decade, we’ve been focused on the threat posed by large quantum computers, and much of our work in recent years has been about developing practical quantum-resistant signatures and key establishment protocols. Now, we’re leading the QuaSiModO consortium, working with ADVA and the other partners to bring post-quantum security to network Layers 2 and 3, and deliver the robust future-proof protection that classical encryption technologies simply can’t.”

https://www.adva.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/20200512-adva-brings-post-quantum-security-to-packet-networks

https://www.genua.de/en/news/insights/2019/new-quasimodo-research-project-launched.html


Europe's OPENQKD uses ADVA for quantum key distribution

The OPENQKD project, whose mission is to create and trial a secure communication network across Europe based on quantum key distribution (QKD), will leverage ADVA's FSP 3000 and FSP 150 platforms.

ADVA will provide optical and Ethernet encryptors as well as open line systems for multiple testbed locations.

OPENQKD, which is funded by the European Commission, seeks to accelerate the commercial adoption of QKD technology and to promote interoperability through an ecosystem of 38 partners, including academic institutions, network operators, and manufacturers of network and QKD equipment.

“By bringing our technology and expertise to the OPENQKD project, we’re helping to address vital security issues in critical communications. Whether in telecoms or government networks, quantum hacking puts the long-term security of sensitive data at risk,” said Helmut Grießer, director, advanced technology, ADVA. “Our ConnectGuard™ encryption technology has earned a strong reputation for protecting service provider and enterprise networks while ensuring highest capacity, lowest latency and maximum scale. In OPENQKD, we’ll demonstrate in practical use cases how our ConnectGuard™ technology can be augmented with QKD to make encrypted communication resistant against quantum computer attacks.”

https://www.adva.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/20200128-adva-to-play-key-role-in-openqkd-project

Quantum Network Link goes live in UK

The world’s first commercial-grade quantum test network link is now operational between the BT Labs in Suffolk and the Cambridge node of the UK’s new Quantum Network, which is being built by the Quantum Communications Hub, a collaboration between research and industry, supported by the UK’s National Quantum Technologies Programme. The new connection stretches from BT’s Adastral Park research campus near Ipswich in the East of England, to Cambridge. The wider UKQN network then extends onward over the National Dark Fibre Infrastructure Service to Bristol in the South-West.

The link uses over 125km of standard BT optical fibre between Cambridge and Adastral Park, with BT Exchanges acting as ‘trusted nodes’ along the route. The link will carry both quantum and non-quantum traffic; the QKD technique shares data encryption keys via an ultra-secure quantum channel over the same fibre that carries the encrypted data itself.

ADVA confirmed that its FSP 3000 is playing a key role in the new UKQNtel transport network secured by quantum key distribution (QKD). As part of an initiative led by QComm Hub, and with partners BT, ID Quantique and the universities of Cambridge and York, ADVA has constructed a QKD link capable of carrying classical and quantum channels on the same standard, installed fiber.

Monday, March 30, 2020

NTT develops quantum light source for optical quantum computer chip

Researchers at NTT have developed a wide-band, high-performance quantum light source (squeezed light source) that could be used for optical quantum computer chips operating at room temperature.

The breakthrough finds that squeezed light has compressed quantum noise that can be used to create quantum entanglement. The light source can output continuous-wave wide-bandwidth high-level squeezed light. The light source can also increase the clock frequency of the quantum computer itself, setting a course for high-speed quantum computation.

NTT said the reserachers succeeded in compressing more than 75% of the quantum noise by using a high-performance nonlinear optical waveguide fabricated by NTT and a high-quality optical control and measurement technology of the University of Tokyo.

Looking ahead, the researchers aim to demonstrate the generation of large-scale entanglement states and various optical quantum operations for the realization of universal quantum computers using this wideband squeezed light.

A paper on this research will be published in “APL Photonics” on March 30, 2020.

https://www.ntt.co.jp/news2020/2003e/200330b.html



Wednesday, March 25, 2020

NTT Research and Stanford collaborate on Coherent Ising Machines

NTT Research is collaborating with Stanford University on a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded initiative into Coherent Ising Machines (CIMs), which exploit unique combinations of optical and electronic components for connectivity, speed, scale and memory.

The NSF has granted a $10 million Expeditions in Computing (Expeditions) award to Stanford’s Department of Applied Physics for research into the use of CIMs for optimization, machine learning and neuromorphic computing.

NTT Research confirmed that its PHI Lab is already conducting related joint research with Stanford, and PHI Lab Director Yoshihisa Yamamoto will serve as an external unfunded collaborator to the Stanford-led NSF Expeditions CIMs team.

“I am excited that the NSF has deemed this project worthy of significant support and look forward to collaborating with the Expeditions team in whatever way can best add value to this important undertaking,” said NTT Research PHI Lab Director Yamamoto. “Stanford is a key research collaborator in our consortium of institutions exploring this new computing paradigm that draws upon quantum physics, neuroscience and optical technology, and we strongly believe that continued collaboration in basic research is key to driving further advances in this field.”

The principal investigator for this five-year project is Hideo Mabuchi, professor and former chair of Stanford University’s department of applied physics in the School of Humanities and Sciences. The rest of the team includes three from Stanford and three from other universities. The Stanford co-investigators are Marty Fejer, professor of applied physics; Surya Ganguli, associate professor of applied physics; and Marco Pavone, assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics and director of the Autonomous Systems Laboratory. The other co-investigators are Peter McMahon, assistant professor, applied and engineering physics, Cornell University; Alireza Marandi, assistant professor of electrical engineering and applied physics, Caltech; and Davide Venturelli, quantum computing team lead and science operations manager of the Research Institute of Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) at USRA. In addition to PHI Lab Director Yamamoto, the three external collaborators are Eleanor Rieffel, senior research scientist and lead, Quantum AI Lab (QuAIL) NASA Ames Research Center; Helmut Katzgraber, principal research manager, Microsoft; and Ken-ichi Kawarabayashi, professor and Deputy Director, National Institute of Informatics (Tokyo).

NTT Research PHI Lab launched its own CIM-based initiative last fall, when it announced five-year joint research agreements with six universities (CalTech, Cornell, Michigan, MIT, Stanford and Swinburne), one US Federal Agency (NASA Ames Research Center) and one private quantum computing software company (1QBit). “The significant investment by NSF into this Stanford-led initiative complements our own efforts,” said Kazuhiro Gomi, NTT Research President and CEO. “In effect, taken together, they represent an important private-public strategy for supporting this critical area of research.”

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Intel outlines "Horse Ridge" cryogenic quantum control chip

Intel Labs, in collaboration with QuTech ‑ a partnership between TU Delft and TNO (Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research) ‑ outlined key technical features of its new cryogenic quantum control chip codenamed "Horse Ridge". The research is aimed at integrating silicon spin qubit devices and cryogenic controls in a streamlined package.

Some highlights:

Scalability: The integrated SoC design, implemented using Intel’s 22nm FFL (FinFET Low Power) CMOS technology, integrates four radio frequency (RF) channels into a single device. Each channel is able to control up to 32 qubits leveraging “frequency multiplexing” – a technique that divides the total bandwidth available into a series of non-overlapping frequency bands, each of which is used to carry a separate signal. Leveraging these four channels, Horse Ridge can potentially control up to 128 qubits with a single device, substantially reducing the number of cables and rack instrumentations previously required.
Fidelity: Increases in qubit count trigger other issues that challenge the capacity and operation of the quantum system. One such potential impact is a decline in qubit fidelity and performance. In developing Horse Ridge, Intel optimized the multiplexing technology that enables the system to scale and reduce errors from “phase shift” – a phenomenon that can occur when controlling many qubits at different frequencies, resulting in crosstalk among qubits.

Intel outlined these details in a research paper released at the 2020 International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) in San Francisco. The paper unveils key technical capabilities of Horse Ridge that address fundamental challenges in building a quantum system powerful enough to demonstrate quantum practicality: scalability, flexibility and fidelity.

“Today, quantum researchers work with just a small number of qubits, using smaller, custom-designed systems surrounded by complex control and interconnect mechanisms. Intel’s Horse Ridge greatly minimizes this complexity. By systematically working to scale to thousands of qubits required for quantum practicality, we’re continuing to make steady progress toward making commercially viable quantum computing a reality in our future,” stated Jim Clarke, director of quantum hardware, Intel Labs.

Monday, December 9, 2019

Intel unveils cryogenic control chip for quantum systems

Intel Labs unveiled a cryogenic control chip — code-named “Horse Ridge” — for quantum computing systems. Horse Ridge is a mixed-signal SoC that brings the qubit controls into the quantum refrigerator — as close as possible to the qubits themselves. It effectively reduces the complexity of quantum control engineering from hundreds of cables running into and out of a refrigerator to a single, unified package operating near the quantum device.

Intel said the Horse Ridge design radically simplifies the control electronics required to operate a quantum system. It replaces bulky instruments with a highly-integrated system-on-chip (SoC) that will simplify system design and allow for sophisticated signal processing techniques to accelerate set-up time, improve qubit performance and enable the system to efficiently scale to larger qubit counts. Designed to act as a radio frequency (RF) processor to control the qubits operating in the refrigerator, Horse Ridge is programmed with instructions that correspond to basic qubit operations. It translates those instructions into electromagnetic microwave pulses that can manipulate the state of the qubits.

The Horse Ridge chip, which was developed with TU Delft and TNO (Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research), will enable control of multiple quantum bits (qubits) and set a clear path toward scaling larger quantum systems. Horse Ridge is fabricated using Intel’s 22nm FinFET technology.

“While there has been a lot of emphasis on the qubits themselves, the ability to control many qubits at the same time had been a challenge for the industry. Intel recognized that quantum controls were an essential piece of the puzzle we needed to solve in order to develop a large-scale commercial quantum system. That’s why we are investing in quantum error correction and controls. With Horse Ridge, Intel has developed a scalable control system that will allow us to significantly speed up testing and realize the potential of quantum computing,” states Jim Clarke, Intel’s director of Quantum Hardware.


Monday, December 2, 2019

AWS previews Quantum Computing cloud service

AWS is previewing new, fully-managed quantum computing cloud service based on hardware from D-Wave, IonQ, and Rigetti. The AWS Braket service allows scientists, researchers, and developers to experiment with quantum computing.

The company is also launching an AWS Center for Quantum Computing that will bring together quantum computing experts from Amazon, the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and other top academic research institutions. In addition, an Amazon Quantum Solutions Lab will connect customers with quantum computing experts from Amazon and its technology and consulting partners.

“With quantum engineering starting to make more meaningful progress, customers are asking for ways to experiment with quantum computers and explore the technology’s potential,” said Charlie Bell, Senior Vice President, Utility Computing Services, AWS. “We believe that quantum computing will be a cloud-first technology and that the cloud will be the main way customers access the hardware. With our Amazon Braket service and Amazon Quantum Solutions Lab, we’re making it easier for customers to gain experience using quantum computers and to work with experts from AWS and our partners to figure out how they can benefit from the technology. And with our AWS Center for Quantum Computing and academic partnerships, we join the effort across the scientific and industrial communities to help accelerate the promise of quantum computing.”

https://aws.amazon.com/braket/

Sunday, October 20, 2019

SK Telecom invests in Switzerland's ID Quantique

SK Telecom has made an equity investment in ID Quantique, a start-up based in Switzerland that is developing quantum cryptography.

The European Union has launched a 3-year European research project, named Open Quantum Key Distribution (OPENQKD), that will install test quantum communication infrastructures in several European countries. It will boost the security of critical applications in the fields of telecommunication, finance, health care, electricity supply and government services. The project will lay the groundwork for a pan-European quantum communication infrastructure that uses satellite as well as ground-based solutions. For this €15 million project, the European Union has selected 38 companies and research institutes across the continent, including ID Quantique, Deutsche Telekom, Orange and Nokia.

Since establishing Quantum Tech Lab in 2011, SK Telecom has been making aggressive efforts to develop quantum cryptography technologies to enhance the safety and security of its mobile networks. In March 2019, the company has applied ID Quantique’s Quantum Random Number Generator (QRNG) to its 5G authentication center (AuC) to prevent hacking and ensure quantum-safe security. It has also applied ID Quantique’s Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) technology to the Seoul-Daejeon section – the most data traffic-concentrated section in Korea - of its 5G and LTE networks, to strengthen the security of 5G and LTE data transmission and reception.

“In the 5G era, security will become increasingly important as all connected things will generate data,” said Park Jin-hyo, the Chief Technology Officer of SK Telecom. “SK telecom will make continued investment in quantum cryptography communication technologies to secure the world’s top competitiveness in this area.”

SK Telecom applies Quantum Cryptography to network security

SK Telecom has applied a Quantum Random Number Generator (QRNG) developed by ID Quantique of Switzerland to its 5G authentication center (AuC). QRNG is a device that constantly generates “quantum random numbers,” which creates strong keys that are not biased and cannot be predicted. SK Telecom said it plans to apply the same quantum random number technique to its 4G network as well.

Next month, SK Telecom will also apply ID Quantique’s Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) technology to the Seoul-Daejeon section – the most data traffic-concentrated section in Korea - of its 5G and LTE networks, to strengthen the security of 5G and LTE data transmission and reception. QKD provides ultimate cryptographic security based on the laws of quantum mechanics. It enables two parties to produce a shared random secret key known only to them, which can then be used to encrypt and decrypt messages.

SK Telecom invested US$65 million in ID Quantique in February 2018.

SK Telecom also noted its pivotal role in global standardization of QKD and QRNG technologies at ITU-T. In February 2019, SK Telecom’s two new technologies related to QKD have been selected as work items by ITU-T’s Study Group 17 (SG17), which coordinates security-related work across all ITU-T Study Groups. Combining these two work items with the two on-going work items on QKD and QRNG technologies it proposed in July 2018, SK Telecom is currently leading a total of four meaningful work items in SG 17. In addition, Sim Dong-hi, a delegate from SK Telecom,  is serving as associate-rapporteur on quantum technology in SG17.

“As security emerges as one of the most important issues in the 5G era, SK Telecom is determined to provide the most secure 5G network and focus on expanding the ecosystem by developing quantum cryptography technologies,” said Park Jin-hyo, the Chief Technology Officer of SK Telecom.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Zapata raises $21M in series A for quantum computing

Zapata Computing, a start-up that spun out of Harvard University, raised $21 million in Series A financing for its pursuit of quantum computing. New and existing investors include Pitango Ventures, BASF Venture Capital, Robert Bosch Venture Capital, Pillar VC, and The Engine.

Zapata is focused on the software and quantum algorithms to enable the next generation of discoveries — for a wide range of industries including chemistry, pharmaceuticals, logistics, finance and materials — on quantum computers.

“For our Series A, we looked specifically for world-class investors who bring a global reach and a depth of experience in enterprise software and applications,” said Christopher Savoie, CEO and cofounder of Zapata. “The success of Zapata’s quantum software platform in delivering real world advances in computational power for applications — particularly in chemistry, machine learning, and optimization — has sparked an enormous demand from Fortune 100 and Global 1000 enterprises worldwide. The new financing will power our expansion strategy, enabling us to accelerate product development and expand our business into new markets and regions.”

“The playbook for quantum computing is being written right now by first movers like Zapata,” said Alán Aspuru-Guzik, cofounder of Zapata. “As the enterprise demand for our quantum solutions continues unabated, Zapata has a distinct opportunity to aggressively and rapidly cultivate the next generation of quantum science talent who can transform the promise of quantum technology into reality.”

The software is designed to run on the latest quantum hardware made by Google, IBM, Rigetti, Honeywell, IonQ and others.

https://www.zapatacomputing.com/


Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Quantum Network Link goes live in UK

The world’s first commercial-grade quantum test network link is now operational between the BT Labs in Suffolk and the Cambridge node of the UK’s new Quantum Network, which is being built by the Quantum Communications Hub, a collaboration between research and industry, supported by the UK’s National Quantum Technologies Programme. The new connection stretches from BT’s Adastral Park research campus near Ipswich in the East of England, to Cambridge. The wider UKQN network then extends onward over the National Dark Fibre Infrastructure Service to Bristol in the South-West.

The link uses over 125km of standard BT optical fibre between Cambridge and Adastral Park, with BT Exchanges acting as ‘trusted nodes’ along the route. The link will carry both quantum and non-quantum traffic; the QKD technique shares data encryption keys via an ultra-secure quantum channel over the same fibre that carries the encrypted data itself.

ADVA confirmed that its FSP 3000 is playing a key role in the new UKQNtel transport network secured by quantum key distribution (QKD). As part of an initiative led by QComm Hub, and with partners BT, ID Quantique and the universities of Cambridge and York, ADVA has constructed a QKD link capable of carrying classical and quantum channels on the same standard, installed fiber.

“Today’s launch is a significant step for network security. As well as being the UK’s longest QKD-protected link able to transmit both classical and quantum applications, this solution breaks new ground by showcasing the readiness of quantum cryptography for real-world transport,” said Professor Tim Whitley, MD, research and innovation, BT. “Our team has been at the forefront of developing quantum-secure telecoms infrastructure from day one. We’ve succeeded in taking the technology from PoCs in the lab to real-world demonstrations. Now we’re closing in on enabling customer trials and plans for full-scale deployments. Soon mission-critical networks will be protected even from cybercriminals intent on harvesting information today in order to decode and exploit it tomorrow.”

https://www.btplc.com/News/#/pressreleases/testing-begins-on-uks-ultra-secure-quantum-network-link-ukqntel-between-research-and-industry-2851900

https://www.advaoptical.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/20190326-adva-plays-key-role-in-development-of-uks-quantum-secured-transport-network

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

ADVA FSP 3000 powers UK’s first quantum network

ADVA's FSP 3000 platform is powering a metro transport system in the city of Cambridge that is being used for the UK's first quantum network.

The project, which is conducted by the UK National Quantum Technologies Programme, super-encrypts data using quantum key distribution (QKD) for complete and long-term cryptographic data security.

ADVA said the openness of its ADVA FSP 3000 platform, which can accept keys from third-party systems utilizing standard protocols, is a vital component of the ultra-secure ROADM-based network. For several years, ADVA has worked closely with Toshiba and the Quantum Communications Hub to engineer the groundbreaking data protection system.

The ADVA FSP 3000’s open interface was developed to comply with early drafts of the new ETSI quantum-safe cryptography standard currently being developed by an ISG headed by Toshiba. This enables the platform to interoperate with external systems and is crucial to the viability of the new QKD solution as it allows the ADVA FSP 3000 to securely and robustly accept keys. What’s more, ADVA’s WDM platform is able to utilize the same fiber for sending high-speed encrypted data as well as for distributing (or generating) quantum keys. QKD is widely predicted to be fundamental to the future of transport network security, especially for finance and government network applications. Distributing encryption keys by transmitting quantum states guarantees the secrecy of data as any attempt to intercept traffic disturbs photons, introducing coding errors and alerting network operators. This makes QKD the ultimate defense against man-in-the-middle attacks.

“As part of the UK National Quantum Technologies Programme in the Quantum Communications Hub, we’re bringing together a wide range of universities, public sector bodies and private companies in a unique collaboration. Our shared goal is realizing the potential of QKD technologies to deliver secure communications. Now, alongside key partners such as ADVA, we’ve reached the stage where QKD-based security is ready for live traffic,” said Tim Spiller, York University and director of the Quantum Communications Hub.

“This launch is a genuine milestone for data protection. By working with Toshiba and the Quantum Communications Hub to advance QKD, we’re ushering in a new age of robust security. This technology will provide peace of mind to businesses most at risk from cyberattacks both now and in the future. They and their customers can have confidence that their data will be shielded from all threats including data harvesting for future quantum hacking,” commented Jörg-Peter Elbers, SVP, advanced technology, ADVA. “In recent years, our encryption technology has earned a formidable reputation for protecting service provider and enterprise networks while ensuring highest capacity, lowest latency and maximum scalability. Our ConnectGuard™ suite offers the strongest protection possible at Layers 1, 2, 3 and 4. Using our FSP 3000 to enable QKD protection ensures our technology will remain at the forefront of secure data transport, even in the post-quantum era.”

“Developing quantum cryptography in fiber optic networks has long been a focus for our team. Over the years, we’ve taken it from PoCs in the lab to real-world demonstrations and we were the first company to achieve a transfer rate of more than 1Mbit/s for quantum communication. Now, through close collaboration with ADVA and the Quantum Communications Hub, we’ve created a fully operational transport network secured by QKD and ready to carry live data,” said Andrew Shields, assistant managing director, Toshiba Research Europe Limited, Cambridge Research Lab. “At a time of increasingly frequent and severe cyberattacks, this technology will prove vital to enterprises looking to fortify their data security, particularly those in the financial sector. Not only does it offer a new level of protection against intrusion on fiber optic networks, but it also safeguards against the upcoming threat of hacking in a post-quantum world.”

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Intel builds 17-qubit superconducting quantum chip

Intel announced a major advance in quantum computing: the delivery of a 17-qubit superconducting test chip for quantum computing to QuTech, Intel’s quantum research partner in the Netherlands.

Intel developed the chip using a mnew architecture allowing improved reliability, thermal performance and reduced radio frequency (RF) interference between qubits.
The design leverages a scalable interconnect scheme that allows for 10 to 100 times more signals into and out of the chip as compared to wirebonded chips.

Intel said the successful fabrication of a quantum computing chip underscores the importance of material science and semiconductor manufacturing in realizing the promise of quantum computing.

“Our quantum research has progressed to the point where our partner QuTech is simulating quantum algorithm workloads, and Intel is fabricating new qubit test chips on a regular basis in our leading-edge manufacturing facilities,” said Dr. Michael Mayberry, corporate vice president and managing director of Intel Labs. “Intel’s expertise in fabrication, control electronics and architecture sets us apart and will serve us well as we venture into new computing paradigms, from neuromorphic to quantum computing.”






Sunday, September 17, 2017

Toshiba's Cambridge Research Lab Sets Quantum Encryption record

Quantum cyptography is postulated to be unbreakable. However, the quantum key must be held by the receiving party for the encrypted message to be deciphered. Until now, the speed at which a quantum key can be distributed has been limited to 1.9 Mbps.

Toshiba Research Europe Limited’s Cambridge Research Laboratory in the UK has just announced a new data distribution speed record of 13.7 Mbps - seven times the previous record, which was also achieved by Toshiba last year. The transmission spanned 10km over an optical fiber.

The details of the new device will be announced at the QCrypt 2017 conference, which will be held at the University of Cambridge from September 18-22.

Toshiba says it is already applying quantum encrption to secure genomic data in Japan.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

IEEE P7130 to define Quantum Computing nomenclature

A new IEEE P7130—Standard for Quantum Computing Definitions project aims to establish a general nomenclature for Quantum Computing to standardize communication with related hardware and software projects.

Specifically, IEEE P7130 will define terms related to the physics of quantum computing including quantum tunneling, super position, quantum entanglement, as well as other related terms and terminology that will be updated as technological advances are made.

"While Quantum Computing is poised for significant growth and advancement, the emergent industry is currently fragmented and lacks a common communications framework,” said Whurley (William Hurley), chair, IEEE Quantum Computing Working Group. “IEEE P7130 marks an important milestone in the development of Quantum Computing by building consensus on a nomenclature that will bring the benefits of standardization, reduce confusion, and foster a more broadly accepted understanding for all stakeholders involved in advancing technology and solutions in the space.”

"IBM is part of quantum information's history, since its foundation more than 30 years ago. And we've been championing important terms, metrics, and scientific methods ever since," said Jerry Chow, manager, Experimental Quantum Computing, IBM Research and IEEE P7130 working group participant. "This standards project will help anyone from students to seasoned quantum scientists nucleate around a common language, while keeping up with the field's rapid pace of change, and further accelerate pioneering experiments and explorations in quantum computing."

"1QBit works with a variety of classical, quantum and otherwise non-standard processors, which necessitates communication between multiple external teams, across a wide range of industries, discussing many different types of computing systems,” said Andrew Fursman, CEO 1Qbit and IEEE P7130 working group participant. “IEEE P7130 "Standard for Quantum Computing Definitions" provides a valuable service to 1QBit, our partners in quantum computing, and the many industries with which we intersect."

“Confusions exist on what quantum computing or a quantum computer means,” added Professor Hidetoshi Nishimori of the Tokyo Institute of Technology and IEEE P7130 working group participant. “This partly originates in the existence of a few different models of quantum computing. It is urgently necessary to define each key word.”

https://standards.ieee.org/develop/wg/QCWG.html

Thursday, June 1, 2017

AT&T Foundry and Caltech plan Alliance for Quantum Technologies

The AT&T Foundry innovation centre in Palo Alto, California announced that it is teaming with the California Institute of Technology to form the Alliance for Quantum Technologies (AQT), with the aims of bringing together industry, government and academia to accelerate the development of quantum technology and to address practical applications.

The collaboration will also establish a research and development program named INQNET (INtelligent Quantum NEtworks and Technologies), which will focus on meeting demand for capacity and security in communications leveraging advanced quantum networking technologies.

Under the new initiative, AT&T and Caltech, through AQT and INQNET, are seeking to create the model for technology development between academic institutions, industry and national laboratories. One of the first demonstrations of intelligent and quantum network technologies will involve quantum entanglement distribution and benchmarking and validation studies utilising commercial fibre provided by AT&T.

AT&T noted that quantum networking is expected to enable a new era of super-fast, secure networking, and through the AT&T Foundry it will support testing of relevant technologies for commercial applications.

AT&T explained that quantum computers will be unlike current systems, being effectively complex physics experiments employing cryogenics for cooling, lasers and other solid-state, electronic, optical and atomic devices. As a result, transitioning quantum computing from the R&D lab into the real world for practical applications will mean solving numerous technical and engineering challenges.

The science behind quantum computing is complex, extending across disciplines such as physics, engineering, computer science and applied mathematics, with the fundamental concept involving the application of the laws of quantum mechanics to processing and distributing information.


Such quantum computing systems are expected to provide exponentially greater computing power, while quantum networking entails linking quantum computers and devices together to create faster and more secure networks with capabilities beyond what is possible using conventional processors.


Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Rigetti Computing Targets Quantum Computing in the Cloud

Rigetti Computing, a start-up based in Berkeley, California, announced $64 million in Series A and B funding for its efforts in quantum computing.

Rigetti, which was founded by Chad Rigetti in 2013, is building a cloud quantum computing platform for artificial intelligence and computational chemistry. It recently opened up private beta testing of its API for quantum computing in the cloud.

The Series A round of $24 million was led by Andreessen Horowitz. The Series B round of $40 million was led by Vy Capital, followed by Andreessen Horowitz. Major investors in both rounds include Y Combinator's Continuity Fund, Data Collective, FF Science, AME Cloud Ventures, Morado Ventures, and WTI.

"Quantum computing will enable people to tackle a whole new set of problems that were previously unsolvable," said Chad Rigetti, founder and chief executive officer of Rigetti Computing. "This is the next generation of advanced computing technology. The potential to make a positive impact on humanity is enormous."

http://rigetti.com/

Monday, March 6, 2017

IBM Plans Quantum Capability for the Cloud

IBM is launching an initiative to build commercially available universal quantum computing systems that would be be delivered via the IBM Cloud platform.

As a first step, the company is releasing an API for the IBM Quantum Experience that enables developers and programmers to begin building interfaces between its existing five quantum bit (qubit) cloud-based quantum computer and classical computers, without needing a deep background in quantum physics. Later this year, IBM plans to release a full SDK (Software Development Kit) on the IBM Quantum Experience for users to build simple quantum applications and software programs.

“Classical computers are extraordinarily powerful and will continue to advance and underpin everything we do in business and society. But there are many problems that will never be penetrated by a classical computer. To create knowledge from much greater depths of complexity, we need a quantum computer,” said Tom Rosamilia, senior vice president of IBM Systems. “We envision IBM Q systems working in concert with our portfolio of classical high-performance systems to address problems that are currently unsolvable, but hold tremendous untapped value.”

https://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/51740.wss


Monday, June 27, 2016

Quantum Random Number Generators for Better Encryption

Quantum random number generators could become the building blocks for effective encryption, according to the Cloud Security Alliance's Quantum-Safe Security (QSS) Working Group.

A newly published whitepaper titled Quantum Random Number Generators looks at leveraging quantum mechanics in the real of cyber security as an improvement over today's software or hardware-based random number generators.

https://downloads.cloudsecurityalliance.org/assets/research/quantum-safe-security/quantum-random-number-generators.pdf