Showing posts with label Packet/Optical. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Packet/Optical. Show all posts

Monday, September 16, 2013

Polatis to Demonstrate SDN-enabled Optical Circuit Switching

Polatis, in partnership with the High Performance Networks Group at the University of Bristol, will host a live demonstration of a hybrid packet/optical circuit switched software-defined network (SDN) at next week's European Conference on Optical Communication (ECOC) in London.

The demo will showcase hybrid packet-optical circuit switching architectures for dynamic management of large flows in data center applications such as virtual machine migration.

Polatis said its series 6000 optical cross-connect offers an embedded OpenFlow interface, enabling seamless integration with SDN control planes. The Polatis Series 6000 OCS adds transparent, flexible, dark fibre connectivity for up to 192x192 fibre ports with less than 1dB typical loss and negligible impact on transmission budgets.

"We are excited about the close collaboration with the University of Bristol, which has allowed us to accelerate our technology developments to support the emerging SDN market," said Gerald Wesel, CEO Polatis, Inc. "Our customer response to the Series 6000 in the last twelve months has been phenomenal. The addition of SDN support across our full product range brings dynamic optical layer connectivity with outstanding performance to the software-defined datacentre".

"Unified software control of the physical layer is a key requirement for next generation networks", said Professor Dimitra Simeonidou, Head of the High Performance Networks Group at the University of Bristol. "Adding SDN support to Polatis optical circuit switches brings dynamic reconfigurability to optical systems and enables us to explore new programmable architectures for efficient, high capacity, telecom and datacentre networks."

OpenFlow is an emerging standard for SDN which can be used to control optical circuit switch (OCS) elements for applications such as router bypass for high capacity data centres, management of dark fibre network connectivity and advanced colourless, directionless and contention-less architectures.

http://www.polatis.com

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Cyan Completes its IPO


Cyan completed its initial public offering (IPO) and began trading on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the ticker symbol "CYNI".

Mark Floyd, Cyan's Chairman and CEO, joined by members of the company’s management team, rang The Opening Bell on the NYSE.

"Listing on the NYSE marks a major milestone for the company and I want to thank the entire Cyan team, without whose tireless efforts this could never have happened," said Mark Floyd, chief executive officer, Cyan, Inc. "As a natural next step, we expect this event to enable Cyan to continue to catalyze the transformation and virtualization of networks globally. Our cutting edge Z-Series platforms combined with our unique, open and proven Blue Planet software, positions Cyan to benefit from the change in the way networks are designed and managed."

http://www.cyaninc.com

Monday, April 15, 2013

Cyan Appoints CMO


Cyan named Joe Cumello as its chief marketing officer (CMO) to oversee all aspects of the company’s global marketing efforts.

Cumello was most recently vice president of marketing at Sidera Networks, a major provider of fiber-­‐based communications services to large enterprises, data centers, and carriers.

Prior to Sidera, Cumello was vice president of marketing at SafeNet, a global provider of data protection solutions, and a senior director of global marketing at Ciena.

http://www.cyaninc.com

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Infonetics: OTN Switching Sees Strong Growth

The OTN transport and switching equipment market grew 8% in 2012 to $7.3 billion and is expected to reach $13 billion by 2017, according to a new report from Infonetics.

“OTN spending, and particularly OTN switching, is benefiting from a rise in investment in coherent core networks,” explains Andrew Schmitt, principal analyst for optical at Infonetics Research. “Many service providers rolling out 100G are using the opportunity to upgrade their optical switching infrastructure. In the metro, investment is rapidly rotating away from legacy SONET/SDH to packet-optical transport systems that combine optical and Ethernet circuit switching in the same chassis.”

Some highlights of the report:
  • The bulk of the growth comes from the OTN switching segment, up 46% in 2012 from 2011
  • Having embraced OTN technology early, North America leads the world in overall OTN deployments, while China is the frontrunner in OTN switching deployments
  • Infinera was #1 in OTN switching in North America in 2012, despite only recognizing revenue in the 2nd half of the year
  • Sales of P-OTS gear climbed 7% in 2012, to $1.2 billion
  • Tellabs and Fujitsu together hold the lion’s share of the P-OTS market as a result of their aggressive deployments at Verizon, while Ciena, Cisco, and Alcatel-Lucent remain in a tight 3-way horse race.

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Telus Picks Fujitsu FLASHWAVE 9500 Packet Optical

TELUS has selected the Fujitsu FLASHWAVE 9500 Packet Optical Networking Platform (Packet ONP) to bring 100G to its network.  Financial terms were not disclosed.

Fujitsu said its 100G solution will help TELUS to meet the bandwidth requirements for high-speed data services, Internet video services, and smart phones, while ensuring a better cost per unit and a lasting technology foundation for their evolving packet-centric regional and national network.

“Our partnership with Fujitsu enables us to continue providing the reach, bandwidth and reliability that our customers require,” said Zouheir Mansourati, Vice President, TELUS Fixed Network Planning & Engineering. “Additionally, by utilizing the FLASHWAVE 9500 Packet ONP for 100G connectivity, TELUS can deliver a high level of service while achieving more efficient regional network utilization, better cost per gigabit of IP traffic, and lower operating cost. Our customers know that TELUS will always support their communications needs with the most advanced and reliable technologies available.”

http://www.fujitsu.com/us/news/pr/fnc_20130326.html

Monday, March 25, 2013

Arvig Upgrades with Cyan in Minnesota


Arvig Communications, which serves some 66,000 customers in rural Minnesota, has selected Cyan's packet-optical transport solutions to upgrade its network.

The deployment includes Cyan's Blue Planet, a software-defined network (SDN) system, and Z-Series packet-optical transport platform.  Financial terms were not disclosed.

http://www.cyaninc.com

Monday, March 18, 2013

Juniper Unveils PTX3000 Packet Transport Router

Juniper Networks unveiled a smaller version of its PTX packet transport router for the converged super core, which allows network operators to converge their networks from nationwide backbones down to the metro core.
Since introducing the PTX platform two years ago, Juniper said it has 20 cutomers, including the London Internet Exchange, Optus Australia, Verizon and XO Communications. The product family also includes the PTX5000, which uses a Junos Express chipset that is optimized for high capacity transport and features the on-chip traffic engineering, full delay bandwidth buffers, algorithms optimized for packet transport and embedded error detection required to support differentiated traffic types. 

The new Juniper PTX3000 Packet Transport Router offers 24 Tbps of capacity and yet measures only 10.6 inches in depth, allowing it to be installed in space and energy constrained environments. 

In addition, Juniper Networks announced an integrated packet-transport physical interface card (PIC) with two-ports of line rate 100 Gigabit forwarding for the entire PTX family, which will enable service providers to cost effectively interconnect sites more than 2000 kilometers (1243 miles) apart.

The PTX3000 packet transport router consumes 1200 watts of entry power for forwarding traffic.

"The Converged Supercore is an innovative platform that enhances service provider economics while providing greater value to their subscribers. Following on the heels of the revolutionary PTX5000, the PTX3000 extends these benefits to new markets and geographies with a solution that is tailored for their specific needs," stated Rami Rahim, executive vice president, Platform Systems Division, Juniper Networks.

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Russia's MTS Deploys ECI Telecom's Apollo Multi-Layer Transport for 100G

MTS, the leading mobile operator in Russia, has deployed ECI Telecom's Apollo Optimized Multi-Layer Transport (OMLT) platforms to extend the existing ECI’s DWDM backbone, enabling all advanced services, including 100G.

The project links Moscow and Saint Petersburg.  With more than 1,000 km, it has been operational since 2003, with both 2.5G and 10G.  By adding Apollo OMLT shelves with 100G cards in add/drop points, MTS can leverage the already installed XDM shelves.

Specifically, MTS has deployed the Apollo OPT9624 to expand its cross-country DWDM backbone based on ECI optical platforms. The new Apollo DWDM network will enable MTS to provide advanced high capacity, long reach 100G services. It includes connection between core routers with 100G link.

"According to our forecast the penetration of smartphones in our network will reach 60% by the end of 2015; launches of LTE networks in Russian regions will force the mobile traffic growth; implementation of fixed line internet and its usage growth will increase the volume of data traffic in our backbones at 6-10 times. At the moment the volume of everyday traffic exchange between Moscow and Saint Petersburg is over 1 Petabyte and we are building the high-performance system of backbone lines sequentially enhancing its capacity to supply the demand in data exchange in long-term perspective," stated Andrey Ushatskiy, Vice-president, Group CTO, MTS





Thursday, December 6, 2012

Blueprint: The Transport Network Challenge

by Scott Wakelin, Product Line Manager in PMC-Sierra’s Communication Products Division

Optical network operators worldwide are faced with a tremendous challenge – expanding their networks to keep up with massive traffic growth and doing so profitably.

In 2012, Cisco’s Visual Networking Index (VNI) projected network traffic would quadruple between 2011 and 2016 to 1.3 zettabytes or 1.3 trillion Gigabytes annually. Video will continue to grow and eventually consume a 55% share of network traffic. Likewise, mobile traffic will grow 18x, driven by the transition to HSPA+, LTE, and LTE-Advanced.

Market research firms project that by 2015, optical spending will increase 25% over the $12B spent in 2010 as carriers prepare to build out their metro and access networks to deal with the massive increase in Ethernet and packet traffic.  

What will the new metro network look like and what capabilities will be required?

Before exploring these questions, let’s review the architecture of today’s typical carrier network.

Today’s Carrier Network


In the access network, TDM services (T1/E1 private line, ISDN, voice, 2G wireless) dominated until only recently. The last few years have seen dramatic changes in the access service landscape with Ethernet replacing T1/E1 for both enterprise and mobile access. At the same time, demand for native Video and Storage Area Network (SAN) transport has accelerated, adding to the service mix that carriers must support.

Meanwhile, outside of China, Layer 1 transport in the metro continues to be largely SONET/SDH based. Today, carriers aggregate client traffic into SONET/SDH (generally at 10G). The resulting OC-192/STM-64 signal is then fed into a transponder which converts the 10G client signal into a 10G wavelength using first generation OTN (ITU-T G.709 Optical Transport Network) equipment. At this point, the signal is ready for transport over the ROADM based DWDM infrastructure.

The access transition to Ethernet coupled with exploding bandwidth demands has exposed three fundamental weaknesses of SONET/SDH based Layer 1 aggregation, which fundamentally limits the ability of carriers to scale their metro networks:

  1. Fixed switching granularities which are only a fraction of the 10G line rate
  2. Inefficient support for Ethernet without the use of VCAT
  3. Little deployment beyond 10G and no roadmap beyond 40G
As a result of these challenges, carriers are preparing to deploy a new metro network. The next section explores the coming Metro Transport Network evolution.

 The New Metro Network

In order to scale their metro networks to handle the growth in access traffic, carriers seek a network technology that:

  • Supports the full range of protocols that exist in the metro, including Ethernet, SONET/SDH, SAN, and Video, without the use of Circuit Emulation or Pseudo-wire emulation techniques,
  • Supports efficient transport of packet services such as Ethernet
  • Is able to scale to 100G and beyond,
  • Offers a simple to manage Layer 1 network that extends end-to-end.
Today, carriers have broadly deployed OTN as the basis for their DWDM core networks and it has proven an effective technology in providing both the management, protection, and reach extension required in the core network.  The desire for continuity at layer 1 between the core and metro networks made OTN a primary candidate for the Metro transport network as well.  However, OTN technology, as originally deployed in the core, fell short in terms of efficiency of Ethernet transport, and switchability.  Nevertheless, the G.709 standard has evolved to become a highly efficient transport technology for Metro applications, with the result that OTN is the nearly unanimous choice of carriers globally to base their Metro networks.

PMC refers to this evolved OTN technology as Metro OTN.

Metro OTN

Let’s look more closely at how well OTN meets the needs of the new Metro network. 

Multi-Service Transport

Metro OTN provides standards-based methods to enable full bit and timing transparent transport of Ethernet (1GE, 10GE, 40GE, or 100GE) – which is critical for the growing Ethernet private line services market. In addition, OTN also supports GFP-F mapping of packet based services such as:
  • MAC terminated Ethernet
  • IP/MPLS
  • MPLS-TP
By virtue of this capability, and when coupled with Carrier Ethernet features such as IEEE 1588v2 (Precision Time Protocol) and Synchronous Ethernet, OTN is ideally suited for the quickly growing mobile backhaul market. 

Now, Ethernet is not the only client in the metro. SAN services such as Fiber channel and Infiniband are commonly used for datacenter to datacenter interconnect. Uncompressed HD and SD video streams are increasingly used in video contribution networks due to their superior quality and low latency. Prior to OTN, these bit and timing transparent services would generally be transported directly over DWDM but did so at the expense of reduced or no manageability. OTN provides the bit transparent transport these services require coupled with enhanced end-to-end OAM that includes 6 layers of Tandem Connection Monitoring (vs. the single layer offered by SONET/SDH).

Furthermore, there remains a tremendous installed base of SONET/SDH with new deployments still expected for at least the next 5 years. OTN was designed to accommodate both asynchronous and synchronous mapping of OC48/STM-16 and OC192/STM-64 clients. In this manner, OTN can provide the means for the bit and timing transparent transport of SONET/SDH, whether point to point or ring based – and importantly, without the need for PWE3 or CES.

 Efficient Resource Utilization

The efficiency issues associated with transporting Ethernet over SONET/SDH are well known. But even 1st generation OTN suffered from efficiency issues. Take for instance a GE to be transported over an OTU2 operating at 10 Gbps. First generation OTN equipment either:
  1. did not support this capability,
  2. did not support it efficiently, or
  3. did not support it in an interoperable manner
In contrast, Metro OTN naturally supports Ethernet, and unlike SONET/SDH does so with a single ODU container to provision, switch and manage. This greatly simplifies provisioning and management, ultimately leading to reduced OPEX. Furthermore, as Ethernet scales in the future, so will OTN.


With the development of Metro OTN, carriers can now efficiently map GE into the new ODU0 container operating at 1.25G – right sized for GE. The GE may be mapped in a bit and timing transparent manner for private line service, or may be MAC terminated for managed service delivery. Figure 6 illustrates that in comparison to 1st generation OTN, Metro OTN will double the efficiency of GE transport.

Figure 6 also illustrates how the new variable rate ODUflex container drives efficiency gains for other common metro access clients. Take for instance 3G-SDI. In 1st Generation OTN equipment, this video client was at best 30% efficient when transported using a 10G ODU2 signal. ODUflex enables a container to be assigned that closely matches the client rate. ODUflex can also be used to transport subrate 10GE signals, which has the power to open up new private line service options for enterprises and revenue streams for carriers, while at the same time allowing the carrier to efficiently use its fiber resources. Furthermore, each ODU container contains all of the OAM flexibility that OTN is known for.


The new ODU0 and ODUflex containers are also switchable. Let’s explore the final aspect of Metro OTN: the support for flexible, granular and distributed OTN switching.

Flexible, Granular and Distributed OTN Switching

The vast majority of access services are sub-10G, with GE the access currency of choice for broadband and enterprise access. At the same time, the metro network is generally built around 10G wavelengths, with carriers preparing for broad deployment of 40 and 100G wavelengths in the metro. As a result, the gap between client rate and wavelength bandwidth is increasing.

In recognition of this trend, early OTN deployments were based on muxponders which multiplex client signals into a single outgoing OTU2, OTU3, or OTU4 as shown in figure 5.

Muxponder based compact metro access solutions are ideal for aggregation of mobile, broadband, and enterprise services, and are a growing trend among equipment vendors and carriers alike. In a fiber-rich access network, muxponders can cost-effectively provide bit and timing transparent mapping of SONET/SDH, Ethernet, SAN, and Video into grey or colored OTN signals.

However, when used in multi-slot / multi-wavelength systems deeper in the metro and the core, muxponders and transponders can lead to inefficient wavelength utilization as a full wavelength must be assigned regardless of the total client bandwidth. Client Add / Drop and Continue is also hindered by the inflexible nature of Muxponder/Transponder architectures. Only clients that are physically connected to a particular board can be mapped into that boards specific outgoing wavelength. This leads to a more complicated service provisioning and management model. For example, if a client needs be moved from one muxponder to another (in order to be transmitted on a different wavelength), human intervention is required. This inflexibility leads to increased OPEX for the carrier.



Metro OTN addresses these challenges through the deployment of OTN switching systems.

In comparison to muxponders, the benefits of OTN switching include:
  • Efficient grooming of any sub-wavelength client onto any outgoing lambda,
  • Maximum wavelength utilization
  • The ability to switch an ODU from any outgoing line interface to any outgoing line interface
  • The ability deploy remote management, eliminating the need for manual patching,
  • Separation of client and line optic interfaces, which enables a carrier to deploy 100G wavelengths as traffic dictates

Unlike SONET/SDH, OTN imposes no limitations on switching granularity. All ODUs may be switched between any ingress and egress line card through a cell, TDM, or off-the-shelf packet fabric using the new OIF OTN over Packet Fabric format.

The deployment of an OTN switching system in the metro is a critical requirement if carriers are to achieve the most efficient use of their network resources at the lowest possible OPEX.  

Silicon Impact of Metro OTN

Just as the metro transport evolution is driving new requirements for OTN equipment vendors, Metro OTN also drives new requirements for silicon vendors. No longer is a simple implementation of G.709 sufficient. The following fundamental features are also required:

  • Any-Service, Any-Port, Any-Rate SERDES and mappers  in order to deliver true multiservice capabilities,
  • High density deeply channelized OTN framing, mapping, and ODU0/ODUflex granular switching,
  • High Density SONET/SDH framing, mapping and switching to enable carriers to transition from SONET/SDH to OTN without stranding their legacy network,
  • Onboard Carrier Ethernet PCS and MACs with integrated packet timing capabilities in order to address the requirements of mobile backhaul in the age of LTE,
  • Packet and OTN fabric interfaces to enable both packet and OTN switching applications,
  • Ability to address OTN, packet and lambda switched deployments with the same device
These features enable the equipment vendor to address all present and future requirements imposed by Metro OTN while minimizing total cost of ownership.

Summary

PMC-Sierra has introduced a new family of OTN products that uniquely delivers on the requirements of Metro OTN enabling OEMs to deliver a new class of transport equipment upon which carriers can build their next generation Metro transport networks which are:

  • Multi-service, with seamless transport of Ethernet, Storage, Video, SONET/SDH, and Private Line
  • Scalable with the rapid growth in packet traffic
  • Switchable, providing fine-grain sub-lambda grooming
  • Efficient, especially for the transport of packet centric services
  • Compatible with the core network, providing end-to-end Access-Metro-Core continuity for flexibility, protection and management.
With this new class of equipment, carriers can achieve reduction in  OPEX and CAPEX necessary to enable profitable scalability to support the upcoming 4x growth in network traffic. 

About the Author

As a Product Line Manager in PMC-Sierra’s Communication Products Division, Scott Wakelin has helped define some of the industry’s most successful communication semiconductor solutions including PMC’s HyPHY, TEMUX, and FREEDM product families. Currently focused on packet-optical transport solutions, Mr. Wakelin has over 12 years of experience delivering OTN, SONET/SDH, and Ethernet products to market. Mr. Wakelin holds a Master of Applied Science degree in network infrastructure and security.



About the Company

PMC (Nasdaq: PMCS) is the semiconductor innovator transforming networks that connect, move and store big data. Building on a track record of technology leadership, the company is driving innovation across storage, optical and mobile networks. PMC's highly integrated solutions increase performance and enable next-generation services to accelerate the network transformation. For more information visit www.pmcs.com.


Wednesday, December 5, 2012

ECI’s Native Packet Transport Brings Simplification with MPLS-TP

ECI Telecom introduced five new Native Packet Transport (NPT) platforms with multidimensional flexibility (capacity, interfaces, protocols) for handling both Ethernet and native TDM traffic in metro networks.

ECI's Native Packet Transport leverages MPLS Transport Profile (MPLS-TP) for handling of packet and TDM traffic, which will continue to co-exist in metro network for a long while. The company said MPLS-TP is ideally suited for the metro because it is simple to operate and manage, because it is scalable to large networks, and because it is lower cost than IP/MPLS + CES (circuit emulation service).  MPLS-TP brings all of the traffic engineering benefits of MPLS, but does not require running the control plane on
thousands of network elements (NEs) across the metro.

ECI’s Native Packet Transport platforms are managed by the company's existing LightSoft  network management system, which ensure unified multi-layer management for     MPLS, WDM and TDM.  The NMS offers GUI-based operation, enabling the packet transport      network to be as easily managed as existing TDM-based transport networks.

"There is no question that data traffic is exploding around us. The NPT was developed to help realize the promise of low cost packet transport, without compromises in functionality. With the NPT, we are addressing our customers’ needs for a simplified solution able to cost-effectively handle both packet and TDM traffic. ECI is once again proving our commitment to be a partner for growth to our customers, by providing tailored solutions that meet their pain points and lower the TCO for the ever-changing transport environment," stated Alon Moshes, Head of the Packet Transport Line of Business, ECI Telecom. ​

http://www.ecitele.com/


Monday, November 12, 2012

Cyan Sets its Sights Internationally with Key Appointments

Cyan announced the addition of four executives to target international markets and expand the sales and reach of its Blue Planet software-defined network (SDN) system and Z-Series packet-optical transport platforms. These appointments include: Paul Couturier, vice president and general manager, Europe, Middle East, and Africa; Mike Scheck, vice president, Latin America; Andy Wu, vice president, North Asia and Japan; and Chris Jacobson, vice president, Southeast Asia. These additions are led by John Halliwell and join a North American team led by Eric Clelland.

 "Cyan's software and hardware solutions allow service providers to contain costs, accelerate service delivery, and increase profitability. These are vital issues for our customers in every region of the world and our products are universally applicable," said Mark Floyd, Cyan chairman and CEO. "Cyan has enjoyed remarkable growth since introducing our unique SDN solution, and we continue to see strong demand worldwide. Assembling this incredibly talented team gives us a presence in all global markets and enables us to meet continued demand for our solutions."

Monday, November 5, 2012

Cyan Debuts Blue Planet SDN, NTT Comm. Deploys

Cyan introduced its Blue Planet software defined networking (SDN) platform for virtualizing service provider networks.

Blue Planet software, which is available now, consists of an open SDN platform as well as Cyan and third-party apps. The software is composed of three distinct elements: an open SDN platform, SDN apps, and element adapter apps facilitating control over a wide range of third-party network devices. The software enables Cyan and third-party apps to interrogate and control underlying network infrastructure. Blue Planet allows apps to interact not only with OpenFlow compliant network devices, but also with legacy devices deployed prior to the development of SDN.

Cyan provides element adaptors to enable control over a broad collection of third-party network elements. In addition to Cyan Z-Series packet-optical transport platforms (P-OTPs), Blue Planet interoperates with select devices from Accedian Networks, Actelis Networks, Adtran, Adva, Alcatel-Lucent, BTI Systems, Calient, Calix, Ciena, Cisco, Juniper, MRV, OneAccess Networks, Optelian, Omnitron Systems, Overture, RAD Data Communications, Telco Systems, Transition Networks, Transmode, and others.

Cyan said its goal with Blue Planet is to "obliterate legacy cost structures, make more efficient use of network assets, and radically accelerate service delivery." Blue Planet aims to build on the virtualization, service orchestration, and hardware simplification principles that have fundamentally altered the cloud data center environment.

NTT Communications is deploying Blue Planet in several geographic markets.

“We are at an important moment in the evolution of the network,” stated Cyan president Michael Hatfield. “For years, service providers and other network operators have been searching for ways to break free of expensive and restrictive legacy architectures mandated by incumbent equipment suppliers. SDN has begun to accomplish this in data center environments by virtualizing resources and flattening cost structures. Cyan is taking the next logical step by applying these principles to wide area and metro networks.”

Thursday, November 1, 2012

Fujitsu Extends MEF Carrier Ethernet in FLASHWAVE 9500

Fujitsu announced support for MEF CE 2.0-compliant E-Line, E-LAN, E-Tree and E-Access services on its flagship FLASHWAVE 9500 Packet Optical Networking Platform (Packet ONP),  positioning the platform for unified CE 2.0 Ethernet service deliveryover any type of access network. The FLASHWAVE 9500 is widely deployed by major North American carriers.

The FLASHWAVE 9500  integrates Connectionless Ethernet (CLE) capabilities with current Connection-oriented Ethernet (COE), ROADM, DWDM and SONET/SDH technologies.  Fujitsu said its key advantage for Communications Service Providers is enabling legacy traffic to be transported with newer, packet-centric communications over the same network infrastructure. Fujitsu’s customers can realize new revenue generation opportunities of MEF E-Line, E-LAN, E-Tree and E-Access services by leveraging the products’ unique capability to deliver these services over their existing SONET/SDH, T1/T3, copper local loop and fiber infrastructure.  Service providers can deliver wholesale MEF E-Access services on the same infrastructure as their retail MEF Ethernet services.

“The FLASHWAVE 9500 Packet ONP has integrated the many transport technologies deployed in our customers’ networks into one software re-configurable MEF-centric services delivery platform” said James Anthony, Principal Solutions Architect, Packet Optical Networking, Fujitsu Network Communications.  “This unified networking solution is packaged in a single system with a single Element Management System that can provision new Ethernet services in as little as a minute.  With the FLASHWAVE 9500 Packet ONP customers can count on flexibility, reliability and scalability that keep the platform’s total cost of ownership well below the revenue curve.”

http://www.fujitsu.com/us/services/telecom/technologies/packet-optical-networking.html

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Blueprint Column: P-OTS... Lessons Learned

By Jimmy Mizrahi

When P-OTS, or packet-optical transport systems, hit the market a few years ago, they brought with them a host of promises for more efficient and cost-effective next-generation transport. The systems were developed to address the increasing share of data and video traffic that’s consuming network bandwidth and capacity and eating away at operators’ profits. Through the integrated packaging of network layers, P-OTS aimed to bring down the cost per bit and reduce the total cost of ownership (TCO) enough to make these rich media services profitable and viable. But P-OTS never managed to deliver on its full potential due to poor execution and unique challenges faced by operators. Fortunately, though, P-OTS taught us all some valuable lessons which are being used to shape the roadmap for a new approach to “beyond next-generation (NG)” transport. 

The Lessons of P-OTS

There are many P-OTS solutions available in the marketplace today, and these platforms utilize a wide variety of architectures and concepts. But none of them quite fit the requirements for true NG transport. Here’s why…  First and foremost, these systems do not provide a real converged solution because they lack full CESR capabilities; in order to support advanced data services, another system must be installed alongside the P-OTS. Next, multiple management systems are needed to support all network layers; this results in higher opex as the technical staff must provision multiple systems rather than a unified system, and there is a greater chance to introduce errors as well. And finally, P-OTS involve a high cost of entry when only part of the solution may be required initially. The reason for these shortcomings is that P-OTS platforms are usually repurposed from vendors’ existing optical or data portfolios and, as a result, they come with inherent compromises. These limitations often lead to higher entry costs, stranded assets, decreased cost efficiency and inefficient OAM – some of the very things that P-OTS endeavored to alleviate.

While P-OTS may have fallen short of delivering on its promises of cost savings and operational simplicity, it did prove to be a step in the right direction conceptually, particularly in the areas of packaging efficiency, multi-layer integration and convergence. Experiences with early P-OTS implementations have provided valuable insight into what a modern telecoms network should look like.

A Roadmap for NG Transport

While P-OTS had some shortcomings, it was a good temporary solution that helped to shape the roadmap for what’s really needed in networks today.

Support for the exponential growth of bandwidth

The amount of data and multimedia traffic that’s traversed networks in recent years has been unparalleled, and this trend shows no signs of slowing down anytime soon. To effectively deal with the rapid growth of bandwidth, a true convergence of network layers is essential.

Reduction in infrastructure costs

Operators don’t want to pay for functionality they’re not using or might never use. To reduce the cost of building and operating networks, a modular and flexible system design is required to provide a low entry cost and pay-as-you-grow scalability for added functionality. 

Alleviation of revenue pressure

Multiple networks mean higher capex and opex and lower revenue per bit. To restore operators’ profitability, Layer 0-3 functionality must be integrated in a single platform to optimize the whole (multi-layered) architecture instead of the individual parts (layers). 

Acceleration of service delivery 

These days, new services have to be turned up more quickly than ever. And existing services need to be easily maintained for maximum efficiency. To simplify and accelerate the introduction and maintenance of new services, a single management system for all network layers is needed to automate the process and save work.

Only a fully integrated multi-layer transport solution can satisfy these roadmap goals and beyond. That solution is the Optimized Multi-Layer Transport (OMLT) platform. 

The OMLT, the First Beyond NG Transport Solution

A highly unique and innovative new breed of transport solution, the OMLT, or Optimized Multi-Layer Transport platform, targets the shortcomings of today’s P-OTS to address operators’ needs and challenges as they introduce new services in a timely and cost-effective way. This “beyond NG” transport solution does this by: 

  • Focusing on the true convergence of the optical and packet layers to reduce the cost of building and operating networks
  • Integrating Layer 0 to Layer 3 functionality in a single platform, making possible the reduction of CAPEX, OPEX and cost per bit 
  • Providing a modular and flexible system design that enables a low entry cost and pay-as-you-grow scalability for added functionality
  • Presenting a single management system for all network layers, allowing new services to be introduced quickly and maintained easily

The fully integrated, multi-layer OMLT addresses operators’ pain points by eliminating integration costs, streamlining procedures and training, reducing network elements and lowering power requirements – with the ultimate goal of reducing TCO, decreasing the cost per bit and making services more profitable. 

Unified Multi-Layer, Multi-System Management

Not only does the OMLT simplify and streamline networks from an architectural perspective, it also does so from a management point of view. Until now, the optical and packet layers had to be configured and managed via several different systems. This was, clearly, a manual and laborious process which held great potential for error, especially when configuring numerous network elements, cards and wavelengths. The OMLT changes all that. 

In contrast to the multiple management systems that were required in the past, the OMLT utilizes a single, unified management system that provides an integrated view across layers, enabling services and the underlying network to be provisioned, managed and tracked end to end. Now, operators can get multiple physical and logical views, making visualization of the connection and correlation between different network layers possible. 

In addition to the unified management system, the OMLT includes a sophisticated planning tool that brings plug-and-play convenience to the planning process, for both equipment and traffic. Whether for greenfield or brownfield installations, the planning tool enables two-way interaction with the management system via an XML (extensible markup language) file that contains configuration information for all network elements, cards, modules and optical attributes, as illustrated here:


This level of optimized, unified network management and plug-and-play planning can save a tremendous amount of time and bring to bear a number of benefits including opex savings, a more efficient use of staff, shorter learning curves and fewer errors.  

Conclusion

While P-OTS failed to deliver on all the promises of operational efficiencies and capex savings, it did provide some valuable lessons learned that shaped a roadmap for the future of next-generation transport networking. That future is the OMLT – a beyond NG transport solution that brings the best of the optical and packet worlds under one platform without compromising on cost or functionality.

About the Author

Jimmy Mizrahi leads the product management team for the NG packet-optical product lines at ECI Telecom. Prior to this role, he worked in Strategic Marketing at ECI, specializing in alternative carrier applications for utilities and cable operators worldwide. Before joining ECI, Jimmy held positions at Tadiran Telecom and Enavis Networks, where he designed network solutions for global and cellular applications. He has 10 years of experience in the telecoms market in the areas of product management, product marketing, strategic marketing and business planning. Jimmy holds a BA in Electrical Engineering from Tel Aviv University.


ECI Telecom delivers innovative communications platforms to carriers and service providers worldwide. ECI provides efficient platforms and solutions that enable customers to rapidly deploy cost-effective, revenue-generating services. Founded in 1961, Israel-based ECI has consistently delivered customer-focused networking solutions to the world’s largest carriers. The Company is also a market leader in many emerging markets and has focused solutions for utilities. ECI provides scalable broadband access, transport and data networking infrastructure that provides the foundation for the communications of tomorrow, including next-generation voice, IPTV, mobility and other business solutions.


Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Cyan's SDN-Enabled OTN Fabric Redefines Metro Networks Without Routers


Cyan introduced a multi-terabit packet and G.709 optical transport network (OTN) switch fabric for its Z-Series packet-optical metro transport platform.  The new card enables router bypass in metro software-defined networks (SDNs) while supporting both Ethernet and OTN. 


Cyan said its approach makes sense because the vast majority of metro traffic is transit, with static connections that do not require higher layer routing.  Therefore, using routers across the metro only adds complexity and cost.  Cyan's multi-layer uses a SDN control plane for planning, operations and validation.

The switching fabric scales to over 4 million pps of throughput performance. The platform design allows for up to 200 Gbps per slot, enabling a range of 10G, 1G and ODUflex services. Cyan's Z77 platform offers 14 slots for 2.8 Tbps of capacity.

"Routers play an important role in the network, but the majority of services do not require routing and can be offloaded to reduce costs and simplify operations. Our Z-Series platforms and SDN software are helping more than 100 service providers around the world achieve these goals in a variety of applications," said Michael Hatfield, president at Cyan.

http://cyaninc.com/

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Cisco's nLight Converges IP and 100G Optical

Cisco introduced its "nLight" technology for converging IP and optical transport networks while introducing programmability.

Cisco's nLight silicon enables coherent 100 Gbps transport services over distances of up to 3,000 km without the need for signal regeneration.  The IPoDWDM technology in Cisco CRS-3 routers lets service providers introduce 100 Gbps technology in their networks and deliver ultra-long-haul, high-speed transport services. Cisco also claims that nLight silicon enables 100 Gbps over existing fiber plant, delivering maximum performance, especially on marginal or impaired fiber segments.  


With the nLight IPoDWDM, the Cisco CRS can converge IP and optical layers at 10 Gbps, 40 Gbps, and now coherent 100 Gbps speeds.



CESNET, the national research and education network which connects close to 100 science, research and education institutions in the Czech Republic, is now seamlessly transitioning to the Cisco CRS with 100 Gbps coherent IPoDWDM solution, using Cisco's nLight technology.

http://newsroom.cisco.com/press-release-content?type=webcontent&articleId=1042271

Monday, September 24, 2012

ECI Announces 100G Optimized Multi-Layer Transport Deployment in Romania

RCS& RDS, a leading cable operator in Romania, is using ECI Telecom's "Apollo" Optimized Multi-Layer Transport (OMLT) platforms to deploy 100G in its network. The 100G DWDM network connects core routers between Oradea to Bucharest -- about 700 km. The operator is using ECI's LightSoft Network Management System to simplify operations and reduce training and personnel expenses. Financial terms were not disclosed. 

ECI has worked with RCS & RDS for more than ten years, supplying them with multiservice provisioning and optical equipment, including its XDM and BG platforms.

  • In November 2011, ECI Telecom announced its next step beyond packet-optical transport system (P-OTS) with a new modular platform that integrates L0 to L3 functionality with a single management system for all layers. The Apollo Optimized Multi-Layer Transport system (OMLT) addresses metro core and regional networks for carriers shifting from traditional ring-based architecture to mesh-based and OTN switching architecture. With the OMLT, ECI's aim is to address shortcomings of packet-optical transport system (P-OTS), especially the need to deploy additional Carrier Ethernet platforms with separate management systems to support advanced data services. The OMLT reduces infrastructure costs by optimizing the whole (multi-layered) architecture instead of the individual parts (layers), while simplifying the provisioning of new wavelength, private line, L2 or L3 services. The OMLT features a Universal fabric supporting OTN, Ethernet and switching between the two. The control plane uses GMPLS across the data (MPLS-TP) and optical layers. 
    The Apollo product launch includes six platforms, along with the LightSoft unified network management system. LightSoft is a graphical automated end-to-end provisioning and management across network layers and technologies. LightSoft's multi-layer interface allows the user to get multiple physical and logical views of the network, facilitating the visualization of connections and correlations between different network layers.

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Ericsson Supplies Packet Optical for California's Digital 395 Project


Praxis Associates has selected Ericsson as the sole optical transport supplier for the California Broadband Cooperative’s (CBC) Digital 395 Broadband Project. 

Ericsson’s packet optical transport platform (POTP), the SPO 1400, will deliver broadband services to schools, hospitals, government agencies and other critical facilities along a 583-mile fiber route in the Eastern Sierra Mountains in California.  The project’s service area encompasses 36 communities, six Indian reservations, two military bases, 26,000 households and 2,500 businesses. 

http://www.ericsson.com
http://www.digital395.com

  • Ericsson’s SPO 1400 family, which leverages a Unified Packet/OTN Switch Fabric, integrates OTN, SONET/SDH and PDH support and performance, L2 connection oriented Ethernet switching and aggregation and WDM technology. The product family previously scaled from 2-service slots and 40G of capacity to a chassis-platform offering 16-service slots and 800G of capacity.  Its latest SPO 1480 scales the solution to 32/40 service slots and a switching fabric with 3.2 Tbps of capacity. It brings fully non-blocking ODU-0 granularity to the metro regional aggregation and it also introduces 100 Gbps Coherent DWDM interfaces.

    Ericsson said the value proposition of its SPO POTP family is the ability to deliver low and high order TDM and packet and wavelength services across the Metro Access and Regional network on a common set of platforms with a single multilayer IP Transport Network Management Systems (IPT NMS). The hybrid TDM-WDM-Packet architecture provides the flexibility to optimize node configurations for location and cost with the ability to scale optical capacity without sacrificing shelf switching capacity.


Monday, August 27, 2012

Dell'Oro: Demand for 40G and 100G Wavelengths in Weak Optical Market for 1H2012


WDM equipment revenue rose five percent in first half 2012 compared to a year ago, according to a newly published report by Dell'Oro Group.  The growth is attributed to strong demand for 40/100 Gbps wavelengths.  However, the report finds that the overall optical transport equipment market declined approximately five percent in the first half of 2012 from year-ago levels to $6.1 billion.

"The optical market contracted in the first half of 2012 due to lower spending in the mature markets of North America and EMEA," said Jimmy Yu, Vice President of Optical Transport research at Dell'Oro Group.  "The emerging regions of Asia Pacific and Latin America, however, did grow as service providers in the regions continued to expand network capacity," added Mr. Yu.

Two other key findings:

  • Huawei captured approximately 20 percent share of the worldwide optical market in first half 2012.
  • Adoption of Optical Packet products continued to rise and contributed close to one-third of the optical market revenues in first half 2012.



Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Cyan Supplies SDN-enabled Packet-Optical in Auckland

Vocus Communications, which provides telecommunications and data center services to ISPs in Australia and New Zealand, is deploying the Cyan Z-Series packet-optical transport platforms and the Cyan 360 software-defined network (SDN) operations system for its newly constructed network in Auckland.

The initial deployment consists of Cyan Z-Series packet-optical transport platforms configured with wavelength selectable switch (WSS) reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM) and 10G service modules. Vocus will employ Cyan 360 SDN operations systems to facilitate multi-layer planning, management and performance verification of the network. Cyan's metro SDN solution also supports multi-vendor integration to maintain operational simplicity while using best-in-class ecosystem components. Financial terms were not disclosed.

http://www.cyaninc.com


 

See also