Showing posts with label Pacific Wave. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Pacific Wave. Show all posts

Sunday, October 15, 2017

CENIC, Pacific Northwest Gigapop, and Internet2 renew agreement

CENIC, the Pacific Northwest Gigapop (PNWGP), and Internet2 will renew their collaboration to provide networking capabilities across the entire West Coast of the United States.

The agreement will extend high-bandwidth connectivity to the academic community using CENIC and PNWGP fiber-optic cable and Internet2’s Ciena optical system.

This supports the West Coast portion of Internet2’s nationwide backbone network. It also supports other CENIC and PNWGP networks and network initiatives, including the West Coast backbone of the Pacific Wave International Exchange, as well as the underlying infrastructure for the core of the National Science Foundation-funded Pacific Research Platform (PRP).

The term of the renewal is five years (2017 – 2022) with additional extensions possible.

Pacific Wave connects twenty-seven networks representing more than 40 countries throughout the Pacific Rim, the Americas, and the Middle East. Pacific Wave has access nodes in Los Angeles, San Jose, Seattle, Denver, Albuquerque, and El Paso and is directly connected to the StarLight International Exchange in Chicago, providing connectivity to all major European R&E networks. Additional new nodes of Pacific Wave are planned for December 2017 in Texas and Oklahoma.

“This is a significant collaboration with Internet2, one of several, which enables network interconnection and transit capabilities for our U.S. and international research partners in order to achieve the performance and service capabilities required by researchers who depend heavily on high-speed access to large datasets, remote scientific instruments, multi-institutional collaborations, and computing resources,” noted Louis Fox, president and CEO of CENIC.


Sunday, October 1, 2017

The Pacific Wave Peering Exchange continues to expand

Pacific Wave International Exchange and its peering and science DMZ fabrics will be extended to Texas’s Lonestar Education and Research Network (LEARN) and Oklahoma’s OneNet thanks to support from the National Science Foundation.

The Pacific Wave SDX, which is a project of the Corporation for Education Networking in California (CENIC) and Pacific Northwest Gigapop (PNWGP), is an integral component of the international effort to interconnect research and education networks using Software Defined Networking (SDN).  Pacific Wave operates multiple open exchange peering points available at three U.S. Pacific coast locations, including the Bay Area (Sunnyvale and Palo Alto), Los Angeles (three sites), and Seattle; three U.S. interior locations in Denver, Albuquerque, and El Paso; and two sites in Tokyo, Japan. It comprises multiple, geographically diverse 100Gbps connections – in Seattle, Los Angeles and Chicago – to Internet2’s backbone nodes and full range of advanced network capabilities. Pacific Wave also operates an SDX testbed with access points in Los Angeles, Seattle and Sunnyvale, and including teaming relationships with StarLight, WIDE/T-REX and others to pilot more global interoperability of next-generation SDX capabilities.

LEARN and OneNet will connect to Pacific Wave via the Western Regional Network (WRN). WRN is an R&E extension of Pacific Wave, created and supported by a collaboration of the major Western Regional R&E optical networks: Front Range Gigapop (CO and WY), New Mexico Gigapop, University of Hawaii, Pacific Northwest Gigapop (WA, AK, MT, ND) and CENIC (CA). WRN employs a dedicated 100Gbps wavelength-based network infrastructure, including “dark channels” provided by Internet2, that spans the West and also reaches Pacific Wave’s international exchange point collaborator, StarLight, in Chicago, thereby making most European R&E networks directly accessible to WRN participants.

Thursday, October 22, 2015

Pacific Wave Activates 100G Link to Asia

Pacific Wave activated the first 100G research and education (R&E) network link between Asia and the U.S., with related transit, peering, and exchange fabric.

Pacific Wave will provide this 100Gbps capability to the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded International Research Network Connections (IRNC) TransPAC4 project, led by Indiana University.

This integrated 100Gbps trans-pacific layer 1, 2 and 3 TransPAC – Pacific Wave network fabric incorporates:

  • A dedicated 100Gbps wavelength between the Pacific Wave national Research & Education (R&E) node in Seattle, U.S.A. and Tokyo, Japan
  • 100Gbps peering and routing fabrics – using Brocade MLX routers - in Tokyo and Seattle
  • Access and peering in Tokyo for Asian R&E networks at both the long-standing WIDE/T-REX/T-LEX Open Exchange Point, and at the newly-established Pacific Wave node at 3-8-21 Higashi-Shinagawa, Shinagawa-Ku.
  • The 100Gbps connection in the U.S. using Pacific Wave’s existing 100Gbps open, distributed, wide-area peering and exchange fabric, which is based on a distributed mesh of Brocade MLX routers, across the Pacific Wave backbone, and has primary points of presence in Seattle, Sunnyvale, and Los Angeles, as well as additional 100Gbps access and peering at StarLight in Chicago
  • On the U.S. side, the Pacific Wave fabric provides direct 100Gbps connectivity with multiple 100Gbps interfaces to Internet2’s Advanced Layer 2 and 3 Services (AL3S and AL2S), as well as 100Gbps connectivity to ESnet, and 100Gbps and/or 10Gbps connections to nearly all the major Asia Pacific R&E networks, U.S. Department of Energy’s ESnet, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration N-wave, and commercial cloud providers regularly used by national and international R&E communities.
  • Interconnection of the U.S.-based Pacific Wave and the Japan-based WIDE/T-REX peering, exchange, interconnection and Science-DMZ facilities, creating the first intercontinental R&E open, distributed exchange and peering fabric
  • Extension of the new Pacific Wave experimental SDN and SDX fabrics across the Pacific Ocean to Asia, enabling direct interconnection with Asian R&E SDN and SDX projects, including those supported by WIDE and others. GENI, OpenFlow, and related projects will also be supported
  • Connectivity to Pacific Wave’s 100Gbps wide-area Inter-institutional Science DMZ network, which has primary points of presence within Los Angeles, Seattle, Sunnyvale, and which serves as the backplane for the new NSF-sponsored Pacific Research Platform


http://www.pacificwave.net

California's CENIC Wins Grant to Expand Pacific Wave Research Net

The Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California (CENIC), along with the Pacific Northwest Gigapop (PNWGP), was awarded a grant of nearly $3.5 million from the National Science Foundation’s International Research Network Connections (IRNC) program to expand the Pacific Wave Software Defined Exchange (SDX) over a five-year period.

The grant enables the expansion of U.S.-Asia scientific research network collaboration.

The Pacific Wave SDX, which will be deployed in Seattle, Los Angeles, and the Bay Area, is an integral component of the international effort to interconnect research and education networks using Software Defined Networking (SDN). The Pacific Wave SDX joins several other IRNC awardees to support research, development and experimental deployment of multi-domain SDXs and will serve as an innovation platform for next generation networking, including enhancing connectivity to campus and wide-area “Science DMZ” infrastructures like the Pacific Research Platform (PRP), which enables researchers to move data between labs and scientific instruments to collaborators’ sites, supercomputer centers, and data-repositories without performance degradation.

Thursday, September 24, 2015

California's CENIC Wins Grant to Expand Pacific Wave Research Net

The Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California (CENIC), along with the Pacific Northwest Gigapop (PNWGP) as a sub awardee and coauthor of the proposal, has been awarded a grant of nearly $3.5 million from the National Science Foundation’s International Research Network Connections (IRNC) program to expand the Pacific Wave Software Defined Exchange (SDX) over a five-year period.

The grant enables the expansion of U.S.-Asia scientific research network collaboration.

The Pacific Wave SDX, which will be deployed in Seattle, Los Angeles, and the Bay Area, is an integral component of the international effort to interconnect research and education networks using Software Defined Networking (SDN). The Pacific Wave SDX joins several other IRNC awardees to support research, development and experimental deployment of multi-domain SDXs and will serve as an innovation platform for next generation networking, including enhancing connectivity to campus and wide-area “Science DMZ” infrastructures like the Pacific Research Platform (PRP), which enables researchers to move data between labs and scientific instruments to collaborators’ sites, supercomputer centers, and data-repositories without performance degradation.

“California’s research universities, along with more than 200 other research institutions across the U.S., will benefit from these enhanced capacities, enabling them to access scientific instruments and exchange data with their research collaborators in the Asia-Pacific Region,” said CENIC President & CEO Louis Fox, who is also principal investigator on this IRNC grant. “We look forward to working with other IRNC awardees, the NSF, and our Asia-Pacific colleagues as we continue to develop this critical infrastructure for international scientific research.”

http://www.cenic.org

Pacific Wave Adds 40G TransPacific Capacity

Pacific Wave has upgraded its U.S. West Coast peering exchange by adding a second 40 Gbps connection to Australia and New Zealand. The link goes from Los Angeles through the Big Island of Hawaii and on to Australia. It complements an exisitng 40 Gbps link from Seattle through Oahu to Australia.

Pacific Wave is a state-of-the-art international peering exchange designed to serve research and education networks throughout the Pacific Rim and beyond and features connection points at three US West Coast locations: the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, and Seattle. It is a joint project between the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California (CENIC) and the Pacific Northwest Gigapop (PNWGP) with support from the University of Southern California and the University of Washington.

http://www.pacificwave.net

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Pacific Wave Adds 40G TransPacific Capacity

Pacific Wave has upgraded its U.S. West Coast peering exchange by adding a second 40 Gbps connection to Australia and New Zealand. The link goes from Los Angeles through the Big Island of Hawaii and on to Australia. It complements an exisitng 40 Gbps link from Seattle through Oahu to Australia.

Pacific Wave is a state-of-the-art international peering exchange designed to serve research and education networks throughout the Pacific Rim and beyond and features connection points at three US West Coast locations: the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, and Seattle. It is a joint project between the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California (CENIC) and the Pacific Northwest Gigapop (PNWGP) with support from the University of Southern California and the University of Washington.

http://www.pacificwave.net

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