Showing posts with label ONF. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ONF. Show all posts

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

ONF moves ahead with reference designs

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) announced a series of reference designs backed by ONF’s operator leadership, which includes AT&T, China Unicom, Comcast, Google, Deutsche Telekom, Telefonica, NTT Group, and Turk Telekom.

The initial set of open source Reference Designs, which target edge and access clouds infrastructure, essentially are “blueprints” for how to put common modular components together to create platforms based on open source. They leverage the ONF's prior work with CORD and M-CORD.

Another way to think of the reference designs is as "swim lanes" for assembling open source platforms for both the cloud data center infrastructure and the underlying optical transport network.

It is also interesting to note Google's presence in ONF's operator leadership ranks. In April, Google announced plans to use P4Runtime as the foundation for its next generation of data centers and wide area network control-plane programming. P4 is a programming language was designed to be target-independent (i.e. a program written in P4 could be compiled, without modification, to run on a variety of targets, such as ASICs, FPGAs, CPUs, NPUs, and GPUs), and protocol-independent (i.e. a P4 program can describe existing standard protocols, or be used to specify innovative, new, customized forwarding behaviors).  The ONF's reference design for a Unified, Programmable & Automated Network (UPAN) will use P4 as its enabling technology. If other telcos adopt the UPAN reference design, Google will be well-positioned to offer them a wholesale service running in its cloud.

In addition, ADTRAN, Dell/EMC, Edgecore Networks and Juniper Networks have joined the ONF as supply chain partners in this reference design process.

“Over the last several years, ADTRAN has fully embraced open, disaggregated and software-defined attributes as the core principles in our Mosaic-branded access focused solutions. We are encouraged by ONF’s new strategic plan and strong operator commitment and believe ADTRAN is a perfect fit as a supply chain partner,” said ADTRAN Senior Vice President of Technology and Strategy Jay Wilson. “ADTRAN intends to contribute across multiple reference design initiatives by applying access domain expertise both in software and systems integration.”



Open Disaggregated Transport Network project gets underway

A new, operator-led Open Disaggregated Transport Network (ODTN) project is underway at the Open Networking Foundation (ONF).

The goal of ODTN is to build optical transport networks using disaggregated optical equipment, open and common standards, and open source software.

The project will deliver an open source platform for running multi-vendor optical transport networks. It will leverage the ONF’s ONOS SDN Controller, automatically and transparently discovers the disaggregated components and will control the entire transport network as a unified whole, thus enabling multi-vendor choice.

The organizers of the project say that just as the SDN movement has disaggregated the data center and operator edge networks, ODTN will bring similar benefits to the optical transport network including best-of-breed choice, elimination of vendor lock-in, cost containment and accelerated innovation.

Backers of the project include China Unicom, Comcast, NTT Communications, Telefonica and TIM.

Each of the five founding operators has committed to performing lab integration and evaluation of the platform for future transport applications. Additional support is coming from leading vendors in the optical equipment space, with NEC, NOKIA, Oplink, ZTE contributing to the software platform and building full solutions, CTTC contributing from academia, and ADVA, Ciena, Coriant, CoAdna, Infinera and Lumentum participating in lab and field trials.

Relationship to Other Projects

ODTN is the only open source solution in the optical transport space, but is leveraging other ongoing work which has focused on standardizing various interfaces and components.

ODTN will leverage and expose TAPI as its northbound interface, leveraging the work coming out of the ONF’s Open Transport Configuration and Control (OTCC) project. Likewise, OpenConfig is the base southbound model and API for communicating to optical equipment.

The OpenROADM MSA defines interoperability specifications and data models for optical devices, networks and services.  ODTN benefits from this effort and, over time, it helps the industry achieve transponder compatibility.  This will eliminate the need to deploy transponders in matched pairs, further disaggregating the solution and enabling even greater deployment flexibility.

TIP’s Open Optical & Packet Transport project is producing open DWDM architectures, models and APIs, covering transponders, open line systems, and routers. In time, the ODTN project hopes to benefit from the availability of open optical hardware coming from the TIP work.  And visa versa, the TIP project can leverage the open source work coming out of ODTN on TIP white box hardware building blocks (such as Voyager).


Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Open Disaggregated Transport Network project gets underway

A new, operator-led Open Disaggregated Transport Network (ODTN) project is underway at the Open Networking Foundation (ONF).

The goal of ODTN is to build optical transport networks using disaggregated optical equipment, open and common standards, and open source software.

The project will deliver an open source platform for running multi-vendor optical transport networks. It will leverage the ONF’s ONOS SDN Controller, automatically and transparently discovers the disaggregated components and will control the entire transport network as a unified whole, thus enabling multi-vendor choice.

The organizers of the project say that just as the SDN movement has disaggregated the data center and operator edge networks, ODTN will bring similar benefits to the optical transport network including best-of-breed choice, elimination of vendor lock-in, cost containment and accelerated innovation.

Backers of the project include China Unicom, Comcast, NTT Communications, Telefonica and TIM.

Each of the five founding operators has committed to performing lab integration and evaluation of the platform for future transport applications. Additional support is coming from leading vendors in the optical equipment space, with NEC, NOKIA, Oplink, ZTE contributing to the software platform and building full solutions, CTTC contributing from academia, and ADVA, Ciena, Coriant, CoAdna, Infinera and Lumentum participating in lab and field trials.

Relationship to Other Projects

ODTN is the only open source solution in the optical transport space, but is leveraging other ongoing work which has focused on standardizing various interfaces and components.

ODTN will leverage and expose TAPI as its northbound interface, leveraging the work coming out of the ONF’s Open Transport Configuration and Control (OTCC) project. Likewise, OpenConfig is the base southbound model and API for communicating to optical equipment.

The OpenROADM MSA defines interoperability specifications and data models for optical devices, networks and services.  ODTN benefits from this effort and, over time, it helps the industry achieve transponder compatibility.  This will eliminate the need to deploy transponders in matched pairs, further disaggregating the solution and enabling even greater deployment flexibility.

TIP’s Open Optical & Packet Transport project is producing open DWDM architectures, models and APIs, covering transponders, open line systems, and routers. In time, the ODTN project hopes to benefit from the availability of open optical hardware coming from the TIP work.  And visa versa, the TIP project can leverage the open source work coming out of ODTN on TIP white box hardware building blocks (such as Voyager).

“It is one of the most innovative technical challenges to deploy open SDN / Disaggregation technologies into transport networks. We expect that it will dramatically shorten the service development term and reduce costs,” said Dai Kashiwa, Director of NTT Communications and an ONF board member representative of the NTT Group. “The reference design and implementation for ODTN will accelerate this challenge, and provide common usefulness among many service providers. So, we are so excited that many service providers and vendors have aligned with the ODTN concept, and started collaboration on specifying common requirements and test/deployment plans. We aim to build and nurture an ecosystem that allows us to deploy and operate ODTN-based production networks.”

Monday, March 26, 2018

Leading operators expand ONF mission to create Reference Designs as Gold Standards

AT&T, China Unicom, Comcast, Google, Deutsche Telekom, NTT Group, Telefonica, and Turk Telekom have agreed to back a new strategic plan for the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) focused on developing reference designs for open source, next-generation SDN solutions.

The operators will work together inside the ONF to create Reference Designs (RDs) to serve as “gold standards” for combining component projects into common platforms upon which operators will build solutions.  Each RD will be championed by a select group of operators, and will be designed with participation by invited supply chain partners sharing the vision and demonstrating active investment in building open source solutions.

The work activity will span all network layers, including mobile infrastructure, the edge cloud, multiaccess edge, and optical transport. The ONF has assembled partnerships with OEMs, systems integrators, VNF vendors, platform software developers, next-gen ODMs and chip companies.

The ONF, which was founded in 2011 and is based in Menlo Park, California, has been behind leading open source projects such as ONOS, Trellis and CORD. These projects have gained significant traction with operators as eighteen tier-1 operators are actively testing and trialling these solution. At least two tier-1 operators are moving into production with projects in 2018.

“The ONF is pleased to share our new 2018 strategic plan for market transformation,” said Andre Fuetsch, President and Chair of the ONF Board, and Chief Technology Officer and President, AT&T Labs. “This plan will position ONF as a premier, operator-driven community and will better align and accelerate open systems solutions to the marketplace. The plan is highlighted by two major components: 1) operators and ONF will work together to create common modular reference designs using components such as white boxes and open source platforms, and 2) operators and ONF will work on driving the components of the reference designs to be production-ready, and in selected areas will create integrated implementations of the designs.”

“Operators’ commitment to take open source solutions into production represents the next big step in realizing the full potential of software-defined, disaggregation and open source. It is also heartening to see operators’ determination to enable a new supply-chain that is well aligned with their goals. Clearly this is a landmark moment and it will set our industry on a new course for years to come. I am delighted that operators consider the ONF their partner in pursuit of this important agenda,” said Guru Parulkar, Executive Director for the ONF.

Thursday, March 22, 2018

AT&T looks to combine XGS-PON with ONAP for virtualized optical access network

AT&T and the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) announced a collaboration to integrate the ONFs' work on multi-gigabit passive optic networks (PON) with the service automation system, ONAP.

The effort will integrate VOLTHA (Virtual Optical Line Termination Hardware Abstraction), the open source software stack powering PON networks, with ONAP.

AT&T said the idea is to develop virtualized and disaggregated network access for PON networks. The integration will build upon AT&T's ongoing field trials of XGS-PON, which is a fixed wavelength symmetrical 10Gbps passive optic network technology. It also builds upon previous GPON and CORD trials.

The current XGS-PON trial is testing multi-gigabit high-speed internet traffic and providing a AT&T DIRECTV NOW video experience to trial participants. To build the network, AT&T used the following open source software.


  • AT&T Open XGS-PON OLT: an OCP Accepted white box OLT
  • ONOS: the ONF SDN controller that hosts virtual OLT control applications
  • vBNG: a virtual broadband network gateway application to manage subscribers
  • VOLTHA (Virtual Optical Line Termination Hardware Abstraction): an ONF software project that provides hardware abstraction and a highly available SDN driver for OLT devices.
  • VOLTHA, the software powering the PON network trials, was developed by an ONF project community and used the latest in DevOps development techniques to enable rapid prototyping and accelerated delivery to the field trial. AT&T's Foundry in Atlanta developed the vBNG software and AT&T provided overall system integration and field operations for the trial.

"Our network is constantly evolving. Collaboration and openness across AT&T, the ONF, and VOLTHA teams will be key to bringing this 10 Gbps broadband network to customers faster," said Igal Elbaz, senior vice president, Wireless Network Architecture and Design, AT&T. "Now that we've proven the viability of open access technology in our trials, we can start the integration with our operations and management automation platform – ONAP."

"AT&T's Access team has been an important collaborator in ONF's mission to provide open source platforms for software defined broadband access and we look forward to building on this collaboration as we integrate with ONAP," said Guru Parulkar, Executive Director, ONF.

AT&T completes software-based XGS-PON field trials

AT&T completed field trials of a 10 Gbps XGS-PON virtualized network using Open Source Access Manager Hardware Abstraction (OSAM-HA) software in Atlanta and Dallas.

OSAM-HA, which was previously known as Virtual Optical Line Termination Hardware Abstraction (VOLTHA), enables a virtualized Broadband Network Gateway (BNG) function to manage subscribers. OSAM is a vendor agnostic operational suite for managing consumer and business broadband access network elements and capabilities; separate from vendor-specific Access Element Management Systems (EMS).

XGS-PON is a fixed wavelength symmetrical 10Gbps passive optic network technology.  During the trials, the XGS-PON system tested multi-gigabit high-speed Internet traffic and provided a seamless AT&T DIRECTV NOW video experience to participants.

One observation from the trial is that AT&T found it possible for GPON and XGS wavelengths to coexist across a single fiber interface.

“Our network is constantly evolving. We’ll continue to execute our software-based network strategy to technologies like 5G, virtualized RAN, and G.FAST over time. Ultimately, instead of deploying islands of technology that have SDN control, we want to orchestrate the entire end-to-end network through ONAP,” said Eddy Barker, assistant vice president, Access Architecture and Design, AT&T.

ONAP stands for Open Network Automation Platform. It’s our virtual access project within the Linux Foundation and will use the first iteration of OSAM-HA technology.

AT&T releases its Virtual Optical Line Termination Hardware Abstraction to ONF

AT&T is contributing its Virtual Optical Line Termination Hardware Abstraction (VOLTHA) code into the Open Networking Foundation (ONF).

VOLTA provides the framework behind AT&T's XGS-PON access network in the cloud. AT&T is currently performing proof-of-concept testing of VOLTHA in its labs and are planning to deploy XGS-PON field trials before the end of 2017.

AT&T described its decision to contribute its VOLTHA code as one more step in its commitment to move toward open source software and SDN/NFV frameworks.







Tuesday, January 16, 2018

AT&T completes software-based XGS-PON field trials

AT&T completed field trials of a 10 Gbps XGS-PON virtualized network using Open Source Access Manager Hardware Abstraction (OSAM-HA) software in Atlanta and Dallas.

OSAM-HA, which was previously known as Virtual Optical Line Termination Hardware Abstraction (VOLTHA), enables a virtualized Broadband Network Gateway (BNG) function to manage subscribers. OSAM is a vendor agnostic operational suite for managing consumer and business broadband access network elements and capabilities; separate from vendor-specific Access Element Management Systems (EMS).

XGS-PON is a fixed wavelength symmetrical 10Gbps passive optic network technology.  During the trials, the XGS-PON system tested multi-gigabit high-speed Internet traffic and provided a seamless AT&T DIRECTV NOW video experience to participants.

One observation from the trial is that AT&T found it possible for GPON and XGS wavelengths to coexist across a single fiber interface.

“Our network is constantly evolving. We’ll continue to execute our software-based network strategy to technologies like 5G, virtualized RAN, and G.FAST over time. Ultimately, instead of deploying islands of technology that have SDN control, we want to orchestrate the entire end-to-end network through ONAP,” said Eddy Barker, assistant vice president, Access Architecture and Design, AT&T.

ONAP stands for Open Network Automation Platform. It’s our virtual access project within the Linux Foundation and will use the first iteration of OSAM-HA technology.

AT&T releases its Virtual Optical Line Termination Hardware Abstraction to ONF

AT&T is contributing its Virtual Optical Line Termination Hardware Abstraction (VOLTHA) code into the Open Networking Foundation (ONF).

VOLTA provides the framework behind AT&T's XGS-PON access network in the cloud. AT&T is currently performing proof-of-concept testing of VOLTHA in its labs and are planning to deploy XGS-PON field trials before the end of 2017.

AT&T described its decision to contribute its VOLTHA code as one more step in its commitment to move toward open source software and SDN/NFV frameworks.






Wednesday, June 28, 2017

MPLS-TP OpenFlow extensions approved

ZTE announced that the 'MPLS-TP OpenFlow Protocol Extensions for SPTN' (ONF TS-029) technical document proposed by China Mobile has become a formal standard of the ONF (Open Networking Foundation) after receiving unanimous approval from the forum's board of directors.

The release of MPLS-TP OpenFlow Protocol Extensions for SPTN is intended to provide a foundation for interworking between devices from heterogeneous vendors, and between devices and controllers. ZTE noted that China Mobile's large-scale deployment of software-defined packet transport network (SPTN) devices provides an example for other operators, while five operators are believed to be planning to implement the standard in the near future.

ZTE stated that packet transport network (PTN) technology features separate forwarding/control and a centralised management architecture, while OpenFlow offers an open protocol that performs programmable control for flow tables on the forwarding plane. In addition, an abstract adaptation layer supporting OpenFlow to encapsulate the existing forwarding functions of PTN is intended to provide an efficient means of enabling PTN devices with open and software-defined features.

Additionally, this design is expected to facilitate the commercialisation of PTN devices supporting SDN and thereby accelerate the development of the SPTN supply chain.

It was noted that China Mobile has a longstanding commitment to SPTN technology, in mid-2015, working with ZTE, Broadcom and Microsemi, establishing a discussion group within the ONF to research device specifications for SPTN based on OpenFlow and table type pattern (TTP).

In November 2015, a first ONF draft was proposed based on SPTN TTP that extended flow tables, group tables and related fields supporting MPLS-TP, expanded the OF-Config protocol to support QOS, OAM, protection and alarm performance configuration, and leveraged local OAM processing units to ensure a 50 ms protection switching time.

In tandem with the draft specification, China Mobile also organised lab tests for SPTN devices complying with the specifications and amended the document in accordance with the test results. The draft document was subsequently passed for review by experts from a number of ONF technical groups and adopted as a formal standard.

ZTE stated that MPLS-TP OpenFlow Protocol Extensions for SPTN standard is supported by the SPTN industrial supply chain, including chip manufacturers Broadcom, Microsemi, Centec and Marvell, equipment providers ZTE, Ericsson, Fiberhome, Raisecom, Greenwell, Chuling and Huahuan, instrument manufacturer Spirent and open source software Open Daylight and ONOS.

To date it is estimated that more than 50 operators have deployed MPLS-TP-based PTN devices at scale, including China Mobile, which purchased around 590,000 group customer devices compliant with the SPTN TTP standard in 2016. In addition, six equipment vendors have worked with China Mobile to deploy the networks.


Tuesday, February 14, 2017

OIF Completes SDN Transport Application Programming Interface (T-API) Testing

The Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF) conducted a six-week long global testing of the Transport Application Programming Interface (T-API) standard from the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) with intra-lab and inter-lab testing across five carrier labs: China Telecom, China Unicom, SK Telecom, Telefonica and Verizon.

“As operators move from SDN PoCs and lab trials into commercial deployments, lack of interoperability between the SDN controllers and the orchestration layer above has quickly become the biggest technical barrier for many operators,” said Sterling Perrin, principal analyst, Heavy Reading. “Building a standardized northbound interface and successfully testing interoperability across different vendors and different networks – as the OIF has demonstrated – is a major step forward in addressing the northbound interface challenge and bringing SDN architectures to wide-scale commercial use.”

Thes testing included multi-domain orchestration of services delivered through Ethernet, OTN and optical switching. Carriers and vendors demonstrated how Virtual Network Functions (VNF) and SDN configured connectivity are combined to deliver service life cycle management.

Participating vendors include ADVA Optical Networking, Ciena, Coriant, Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd., Infinera, Juniper Networks, NEC Corporation, Sedona Systems, and SM Optics. Consulting carriers include Orange and TELUS. Academic and/or research institution participants include China Academy of Telecommunication Research (CATR) and Centre Tecnològic de Telecomunicacions de Catalunya (CTTC).

Participants also submitted a proof of concept demo proposal to ETSI NFV called “Mapping ETSI-NFV onto Multi-Vendor, Multi-Domain Transport SDN”.

A technical white paper on the demonstration is available to download.

http://www.oiforum.com/meetings-and-events/2016-oif-sdn-t-api-demo/

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

ONF's Dan Pitt: SDN Meets MEF's Lifecycle Service Orchestration

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) has been working with the MEF for over a year to bring SDN and NFV into the scope of Carrier Ethernet, says Dan Pitt, Executive Director of ONF.

The focus now is on Lifecycle Service Orchestration and carrier-grade SDN into multi-carrier deployments.

See video: https://youtu.be/UYtHIjTg8H8


Thursday, July 21, 2016

ONOS Project and ONF Develop Leaf-Spine Fabric

The ONOS Project, which is the open source SDN Network Operating System (ONOS) for service providers and mission-critical networks and hosted by the Linux Foundation, and the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) have collaborated to develop a leaf-spine fabric solution for data centers and service provider Central Offices.

The effort has resulted in the first L2/L3 leaf-spine fabric on bare-metal switching hardware that is built with SDN principles and open source software.

“Underlay and overlay fabrics represent important ONOS use cases,” said Guru Parulkar, executive director of ON.Lab. “ONOS Project, in partnership with ONF and several active ONOS collaborators, have delivered a highly flexible, economical and scalable solution as software defined data centers gain momentum. This is also a great example of collaboration between ONF and ON.Lab to create open source solutions for the industry.”

“This is an L2/L3 SDN fabric with state-of-the-art white box hardware and completely open source switch, controller and application software,” said Saurav Das, principal architect at the Open Networking Foundation. “No traditional networking protocols found in commercial solutions are used inside the fabric, which instead uses an integrated SDN-based solution. In the past, the promise of SDN has fallen short in delivering HA, scale and performance. The fabric control application design, together with ONOS, and the full use of modern merchant silicon ASICs solve all of these problems. In addition, the use of SDN affords a high degree of customizability for rapidly introducing newer features in the fabric. CORD’s usage of the fabric is an excellent example of such customization.”

Some highlights:

  • The fabric is built on Edgecore bare-metal hardware from the Open Compute Project (OCP) and switch software, including OCP’s Open Network Linux and Broadcom’s OpenFlow Data Plane Abstraction (OF-DPA) API. 
  • It leverages earlier work from ONF’s Atrium and SPRING-OPEN projects that implemented segment-routed networks using SDN.
  • It offers HA and scale support with multi-instance ONOS controller cluster (previous work was with single-controller)
  • vRouter for interfacing with traditional networks using BGP and/or OSPF
  • CORD’s vOLT for residential access network support
  • Support for IPv4 Multicast forwarding for residential IPTV streams in CORD
  • Integration with CORD’s XOS-based orchestration framework


http://onosproject.org/

Saturday, February 27, 2016

Preview #ONS2016 with Jim Zemlin

The Linux Foundation is bringing its unique industry standing to this year's #ONS2016, says Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of the Linux Foundation.  This relates directly to the big open source projects, including OpenDaylight, OPNFV, ONOS -- all of which are defining the future open source footprint of networking.




YouTube link: https://youtu.be/anx_IWMxIDE

Open Networking Summit - March 14-16, 2016
Santa Clara Convention Center
Santa Clara, California
http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/open-networking-summit








Tuesday, February 16, 2016

ONF Extends its Open SDN Software with OpenDaylight Support

The second release of Atrium, an open SDN software distribution from The Open Networking Foundation (ONF), extends support for the OpenDaylight platform into the Atrium software router.

Specifically, the router in the new Atrium release is built on the OpenDaylight framework and controls OpenFlow hardware switches using Quagga’s open-source implementation of the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), a control plane protocol for Internet routing. The most important features of Atrium’s first release, namely flow objectives and device drivers, are implemented in the OpenDaylight Device Identification and Driver Module (DIDM) that allows the router to work across multiple different OpenFlow v1.3 hardware pipelines. The work on this portion was contributed almost entirely by Criterion Networks and Wipro. Hardware from NoviFlow interoperates with the OpenDaylight implementation of Atrium, with additional vendors to follow.

This release of Atrium also improves the ONOS version (Atrium 2015/A) by improving scalability and stability and by adding experimental support for the Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP), following interoperability demonstrations and testing in AsiaPac, Europe, and North America. Performance and scale test contributors include Criterion Network Labs (CNLabs) and improvements to the basic router have come from ON.Lab.

In addition, this version of Atrium includes a new feature called the Leaf-Spine Fabric. This is the first Layer 2/3 Clos network fabric built in open source, on Open Compute Project (OCP) hardware, and with SDN principles and notable contributions from ON.Lab, Broadcom, and Accton. The Atrium fabric is designed to scale up to 16 racks, using well-established design principles of Layer 3 down to the Top of Rack (ToR) switch, where packets from Layer 2 are switched within a rack and Layer 3 routed across racks. The fabric is set for a field trial with a major operator soon, as part of the Central Office Re-architected as Data Center (CORD) project with ON.Lab.

“In this release of Atrium, the porting to OpenDaylight provides a large and vibrant community with a new vehicle for adopting open SDN,” said Bithika Khargharia, director of Product and Community Management for the Open Networking Foundation and principal architect of Solutions and Innovation at Extreme Networks. “ONF is actively creating an ecosystem and the architecture needed to assist network operators to more easily build custom solutions and allow vendors to take advantage of common building blocks, reducing their development costs and improving interoperability.”

“We are excited by this latest Atrium release incorporating OpenDaylight as we strive to make the adoption of open SDN broader and easier,” said Dan Pitt, executive director of the Open Networking Foundation. “Application developers seek portability across various control planes and we hope this sets an example of how it can be done. I am especially grateful to our members Criterion Networks and Wipro for undertaking this porting, and to the OpenDaylight community for their collaboration and support.”

“Including OpenDaylight integration within Atrium 2016/A provides greater opportunities for operators and vendors to adopt open SDN architectures,” said Neela Jacques, executive director of OpenDaylight. “The increase of open SDN projects within the industry through community contributions shows that the industry is on the right path to accelerating commercial adoption of open SDN. We look forward to continued collaboration with ONF as the industry evolves its approach to open, programmable networks enabled by open source SDN.”

http://www.opensourcesdn.org

ONF Readies Atrium Open SDN Software Release

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) announced its "Atrium" open SDN software distribution, integrating previously standalone open source components.

Atrium, which will be released by the end of the month, incorporates the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), the Open Network Operating System (ONOS), and Open Compute Project (OCP) components. The software elements run in either controllers or switches, communicating via the OpenFlow protocol, and include plugin opportunities for other switching solutions to help foster an open ecosystem of interoperable, hardware-based OpenFlow switches.

Atrium 2015/A components include:

  • Documentation for installation, configuration, and operation
  • A snapshot of ONOS verified to work with the white-box software stack as well as other vendor switches that have provided a driver for their pipeline
  • A BGP peering application that runs on ONOS and includes the Quagga BGP stack
  • A collection of OpenFlow v1.3 device drivers in ONOS, meant for talking to vendor equipment with different hardware pipelines
  • Indigo OpenFlow client together with Open Network Linux and OFDPA for the OCP white-box switches
  • Mininet with the use of Open vSwitch (OVS) to emulate the hardware pipelines of the switches involved; (hardware pipelines represent a sequence of match-action tables in an OpenFlow switch)
  • Full testing suite for functionality test
http://www.opensourcesdn.org
https://www.opennetworking.org

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Blueprint: Can OpenFlow 1.3.1 and TTP Enable SDN for Carrier Networks?

by Nicholas Ilyadis
Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Infrastructure & Networking Group (ING), Broadcom


Software Defined Networking (SDN) is a trend that continues to garner widespread industry attention these days due to its ability to manage network complexity via a network-wide software platform. Perhaps the most well-known of all SDN instantiations is OpenFlow; the industry’s first standard communications interface between the control and forwarding layers of an SDN architecture. Originally introduced by Stanford and later taken over by the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) consortium, the technology has steadily amassed a growing community of users. And it’s those users who have helped guide the technology’s evolution through the years.
A perfect case in point is the introduction of the OpenFlow 1.3.1 switch specification. It was developed in direct response to the community’s need for a switch that mapped to OpenFlow; a capability that would help enable SDN for carrier networks. The problem was figuring out just how to make it happen. That task fell to the ONF’s Forwarding Abstractions Working Group (FAWG).
At the outset FAWG faced a key challenge: OpenFlow 1.0 was not designed on switches. It was developed on servers and that meant that all of the data structures for forwarding data flows through a network, and being able to do look-ups and make decisions on packet flows and forwarding were basically mapped into the server memory. Servers have a significant amount of memory so it was fairly easy to create a unified table that could be used to reference the packet heade
rs coming in and make forwarding decisions.

This approach; however, was at odds with what the OpenFlow community wanted. It wanted a uniform model that could be used to describe an OpenFlow switch; a single table with entries in it that could be used to design a switch with that construct. But switches don’t have that construct; they have several different constructs. And they are typically made out of several smaller tables that are used to look up different parts of a packet header, rather than just one massive table. Switches just don’t have the same resources as servers. Porting OpenFlow 1.0 to switches became a challenge and limited its capabilities on real-world switch hardware.

Faced with this reality, FAWG began to consider another possibility. Rather than redesigning all switches to fit the OpenFlow model, perhaps it could just modify OpenFlow to be more applicable to real-world switches.

As an example, consider that when we say the word “car” today, it quickly conjures up an image of a vehicle with four wheels, a steering wheel, gear shifter, and brake and gas pedals. This uniform description ensures that you have the ability to drive a car, regardless of its types (e.g., SUV or sedan), as long as it meets the key elements specified in that description. This same type of uniform description is exactly what FAWG set out to create, only for the switch.

What it came up with is a way to describe a switch in a uniform manner using Table Type Partitioning (TTP) that OpenFlow understands and that is inclusive enough to allow many different real-world switches to fit that description. TTP is leveraged in OpenFlow 1.3.1.

A TTP is an abstract switch model that describes specific switch forwarding behaviors that an OpenFlow controller can program via the OpenFlow-Switch protocol. The switch forwarding behaviors are described via a sequence of tables that have ingress port information coming in and match fields going out. OpenFlow 1.3.1 specifies an OpenFlow switch that defines a pipeline containing multiple tables with each table containing multiple flow entries. Any variability in the switch that is outside of the TTP is covered as an extension, in much the same way that you could add features to the uniform car description, such as special lights or two versus four seats.

Because real-world switches from different vendors can now be described as a set of TTPs, they can be easily programmed to do their jobs, without users having to worry about any underlying details, such as how they were built or with what components. It’s really no different than being able to drive say, a sports car, without having to be concerned with what type of engine it has. At the end of the day, that means greater adoption of the OpenFlow standard on hardware forwarding targets and, with broad adoption of common TTPs, easier controller implementation will surely follow.

While the OFN’s FAWG was able to come up with a way for OpenFlow to understand real-world switches in a uniform manner, its efforts do nothing to address how to map the real-world switch to the TTP model in OpenFlow 1.3.1. And, that means deploying OpenFlow 1.3.1 in real-world deployments is neither quick nor easy.

One resolution to this dilemma comes from an industry source and it takes the form of an open source abstraction layer known as OpenFlow-Data Plan Abstract (OF-DPA) 1.0. OF-DPA essentially homogenizes the underlying switch so that it meets the OpenFlow 1.3.1 model. Or more simply put, it takes an SUV or sedan and makes it look like a generic car model.

With little doubt, OpenFlow is hoping to play a critical role in transforming the future of networking. OpenFlow 1.3.1 and TTPs, by enabling OpenFlow on industry standard switches, also aims to contribute to that transformation. Now, developments like OF-DPA are taking things one step further by making deployment of SDN in existing switch networks quick and easy. These advances bode well for enabling SDN on carrier networks, and that means network administrators will be able to roll out new services and functionality faster and with fewer errors, and more easily balance network loads. It’s capabilities like this that make SDN such a compelling answer to the complex challenges facing today’s networks and data centers.

About the Author

Nicholas (Nick) Ilyadis serves as Vice President and Chief Technical Officer of Broadcom’s Infrastructure and Networking Group (ING), where he is responsible for product strategy and cross portfolio initiatives for a broad portfolio of Ethernet chip products including network switches, high speed controllers, PHYs, enterprise WLAN, SerDes, silicon photonics, processors and security. Prior to Broadcom, Ilyadis served as Vice President of Engineering for Enterprise Data Products at Nortel Networks and held various engineering positions at Digital Equipment Corporation and Itek Optical Systems. Ilyadis holds an MSEE from the University of New Hampshire and a BTEE from the Rochester Institute of Technology. Ilyadis is a senior member of the IEEE and contributes to both the IEEE Computer and Communications Societies.


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Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Layer123: ONF Predicts 2016 Will Be the Year of the Northbound Interface

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) released its annual set of networking industry predictions for 2016:

2016 is the year of the northbound interface -- ONF predicts that we will see industry agreement on, investment in, and deployment of a small number of popular NBIs. They will apply to specific use cases (such as real-time media) or operating environments (particularly relative to OpenStack). As a result, we will see the emergence of applications using these NBIs to their advantage.

Open source will be put to good use -- 2015 was a big year for open source in the SDN community. In 2016, we’ll see SDN-based enterprise production applications using the developments that began this year, including open source controllers such as the Open Network Operating System (ONOS), OpenDaylight, and Ryu; Linux networking projects like IO Visor; and the above-mentioned NBIs. ONF embarked on our own open source initiatives this past year with the development of OpenSourceSDN.org, an open source software community and code repository. In the past eight months, the community has completed and released three projects including Atrium 2015/A, a software distribution; Aspen, a real-time NBI for multimedia traffic; and Boulder, an open source intent-based NBI. All told, there are over a dozen projects in the repository, generated by the community (including but not limited to our working groups). We expect to see these frameworks emerge in commercially available products.

Service provider adoption of SDN to expand worldwide -- Service provider adoption of SDN begin in 2015, especially in Asia (China, Hong Kong, Korea, and Japan). 2016 will bring about continued and expanded adoption globally because of competitive pressures and now-demonstrated advantages, with OpenFlow enabling carrier SDN beginning with optical transport and packet-optical integration, then extending up to NFV (given its high traction) and into management (as the OSS is finally disaggregated).

The intersection of SDN and Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) rises to the spotlight -- It’s great to virtualize a computing function and house it in a commodity server in a data center. But to have it effect behavioral changes in the network itself requires SDN, which is based on exactly this model of separated forwarding and control; consider load balancing, ACLs, and even WAN optimization. SDN supports these virtual network functions now. Moreover, using SDN for service function chaining in the control plane – perhaps the hottest demand among NFV users – extends virtualization into the hypervisor and server itself. Thus the full benefits of aligning networking control and forwarding are best achieved with a foundation of SDN, and that requires more than just trading proprietary servers for commodity ones. In 2016, the combination of SDN and NFV will become commonplace in both carrier networks and enterprise clouds.

SDN and NFV lend a hand to 5G progress -- the role of SDN in 5G will become clear and may well be a thread that ties the multiplicity of meanings of 5G together.

“Last year we predicted that open source software would be recognized as a desirable route to network standards with vendors looking to open source communities as a way to reduce development expenses,” said Dan Pitt, executive director of the Open Networking Foundation. “Over the past 12 months we’ve seen an increase in participation from vendors and operators alike in open source organizations helping to propel their development and ensure their deployment into networks. The industry as a whole has seen great advancements in the past year that are delivering on the initial promise of SDN. We are no longer talking about its potential; we are seeing SDN in action. ONF is proud of the progress that has been made this year, and we expect that it will lay the foundation for global advancements in 2016 and beyond.”

http://www.opennetworking.org


Tuesday, September 8, 2015

ONF Releases OpenFlow v1.3 Testing Specification

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) released a new OpenFlow v1.3 testing specification.

The ONF also announced the addition of its seventh authorized testing facility, the Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) in South Korea. This brings to seven the number of accredited international testing laboratories, including: Beijing Internet Institute (BII) in Beijing; China Telecommunication Technology Labs (CTTL) in Beijing; Criterion Network Labs (CNLabs) in Bangalore; Indiana Center for Network Translational Research and Education (InCNTRE) at Indiana University; Network Benchmarking Lab (NBL) of National Chiao Tung University (NCTU) in Hsinchu, Taiwan; and the University of New Hampshire InterOperability Lab (UNH-IOL) at the University of New Hampshire.

“OpenFlow is a component vital to SDN’s acceleration and deployment worldwide and is increasingly being demanded by network operators,” said Dan Pitt, executive director of the Open Networking Foundation. “OpenFlow plays a key role in SDN as an architecture, a model, and an interface. Operators are also demanding interoperability and conformance to the standard, and this specification helps achieve exactly that.”

https://www.opennetworking.org/certification/product

Sunday, June 21, 2015

By open, we mean not controlled by a single party, says Dan Pitt

Customers love open... but "open" has many different flavors and varieties, says Dan Pitt, Executive Director of the Open Networking Foundation.

"We've been strong advocates of open SDN for a long time. "

"By open, we mean not just published, but not controlled by a single party. It is good that people are opening up and publishing. There are open standards, open specifications, and open interfaces.  It is important that they be community-defined."

http://open.convergedigest.com/2015/06/by-open-we-mean-not-controlled-by-singe.html

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Accton Contributes Open Switch Software to ONF’s Atrium

Accton Technology has contributed switch software to Atrium, the Open Network Foundation’s new open source SDN distribution for OpenFlow-based SDN deployments.

Specifically, Accton’s contribution to ONF’s Atrium distribution enables the use of Edge-Core open network switches in OpenFlow-based SDN deployments.

With the first release of Atrium, an SDN network can be deployed using Edge-Core switches communicating via the OpenFlow v1.3 protocol to the Open Network Operating System (ONOS) SDN controller running a BGP peering application based on Quagga. The Accton contribution consists of the following open source software components, which were integrated, ported and validated by Accton on the Edge-Core AS5710-54X 10GbE top-of-rack switch, the first switch hardware design fully approved by the Open Compute Project (OCP):


  • Open Network Linux, the OCP-approved reference NOS;
  • OpenFlow Data Plane Abstraction (OF-DPA), developed by Broadcom and implementing an OpenFlow hardware abstraction layer;
  • Indigo OpenFlow client.
  • Accton will continue working with ONF’s Atrium project by enhancing the Accton contribution to support Edge-Core’s 40GbE and 100GbE open network switches, and by supporting the next release of Atrium running on the OpenDaylight SDN and NFV software platform.

Accton also announced that it will make available open switch software distributions with additional features to enable customers, data center operators, software providers and the open source community to develop software applications to automate and control networks deploying Accton’s Edge-Core open network switches. The open switch software distribution will consist of the following open source software elements, packaged and validated by Accton on the Edge-Core 10GbE, 40GbE, and 100GbE open network switches:

  • Open Network Linux, the OCP-approved reference NOS;
  • OpenFlow Data Plane Abstraction (OF-DPA), developed by Broadcom and implementing an OpenFlow hardware abstraction layer;
  • Indigo OpenFlow client;
  • OpenNSL, contributed by Broadcom and implementing an open API to the Broadcom StrataXGS switch silicon which is designed into the Edge-Core OCP switches;
  • FBOSS Agent, contributed by Facebook to provide an interface to control Broadcom switch silicon and manage low-level control packets.

“Cloud providers and enterprises with web-scale infrastructures want greater automation and control over their networks through the use of open software platforms,” said Jeff Catlin, VP Technology, Accton Technology Corporation. “With our contributions to ONF’s open source SDN distribution and with Accton’s distribution of open switch software, we are enabling an ecosystem of customers, cloud providers, software companies, and the open source community to add value on top of our OCP-approved Edge-Core switches to deploy SDN and NFV architectures that meet those needs.”

http://www.accton.com


  • Last week, the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) announced its "Atrium" open SDN software distribution, integrating previously standalone open source components. Atrium, which will be released by the end of the month, incorporates the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), the Open Network Operating System (ONOS), and Open Compute Project (OCP) components. The software elements run in either controllers or switches, communicating via the OpenFlow protocol, and include plugin opportunities for other switching solutions to help foster an open ecosystem of interoperable, hardware-based OpenFlow switches.

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

ONF Readies Atrium Open SDN Software Release

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) announced its "Atrium" open SDN software distribution, integrating previously standalone open source components.

Atrium, which will be released by the end of the month, incorporates the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), the Open Network Operating System (ONOS), and Open Compute Project (OCP) components. The software elements run in either controllers or switches, communicating via the OpenFlow protocol, and include plugin opportunities for other switching solutions to help foster an open ecosystem of interoperable, hardware-based OpenFlow switches.

Atrium 2015/A components include:

  • Documentation for installation, configuration, and operation
  • A snapshot of ONOS verified to work with the white-box software stack as well as other vendor switches that have provided a driver for their pipeline
  • A BGP peering application that runs on ONOS and includes the Quagga BGP stack
  • A collection of OpenFlow v1.3 device drivers in ONOS, meant for talking to vendor equipment with different hardware pipelines
  • Indigo OpenFlow client together with Open Network Linux and OFDPA for the OCP white-box switches
  • Mininet with the use of Open vSwitch (OVS) to emulate the hardware pipelines of the switches involved; (hardware pipelines represent a sequence of match-action tables in an OpenFlow switch)
  • Full testing suite for functionality tests

“ONF is actively creating the ecosystem and the architecture needed to bring open SDN to network operators around the world. Atrium is the first top-to-bottom, soup-to-nuts open source implementation that someone can actually download from GitHub and use to run a real network,” said Dan Pitt, executive director of the Open Networking Foundation. “Atrium’s philosophy is to build on software from many developers that has been community developed and tested to help network operators more easily build custom solutions and allow vendors to take advantage of common building blocks, reducing their development costs and improving interoperability. ONF views open source software as critical to accelerating commercial adoption of open SDN.”

“We have adopted an extensible architecture so that adding features and a variety of forwarding planes will follow easily,” said Saurav Das, principal system architect at the Open Networking Foundation. “With community contribution, this platform should evolve even more rapidly.”

“Atrium is entirely focused on ease of open SDN deployment by lowering barriers to adoption,” said Yatish Kumar, Atrium project lead, member of the ONF Technical Council, director of the ONF Specifications Area, and CTO of Corsa Technology. “We continue to view OpenFlow as key to meeting operator needs for a functional multi-vendor southbound protocol. We will build on Atrium’s offerings not only in the controller and switch spaces but also in the application space, making sure that the OpenSourceSDN.org community has a voice in what is included in future releases.”

Industry Support for Atrium
ONF’s open source software initiatives are built on a collaborative effort to ensure our work is complementary to and interoperable with the work being done by other organizations. Organizations supporting ONF’s efforts have said:

"Transitioning the networking industry to shared development around open source code rather than proprietary protocols is a key part of the ONF Mission,” said Urs Hölzle, chairman and president of the Open Networking Foundation and senior vice president of Technical Infrastructure and Google Fellow, Google. “Atrium is an important step toward realizing this direction."

“We are pleased to see OCP adopted for the open source hardware and operating software for the forwarding plane in Atrium,” said Corey Bell, CEO of the Open Compute Project. “Together with ONF and partners we are moving the industry to new models of efficiency and innovation in networking and computing for the benefit of all who operate IT infrastructures.”

“It's great to see more momentum building around open solutions for users,” said Neela Jacques, executive director of OpenDaylight. “ONF is a key partner and we share a common vision and purpose to promote SDN. We look forward to seeing the next release of Atrium running on OpenDaylight offering even more opportunities for operators to adopt open SDN.”

“We value working closely with ONF and pleased to bring Atrium to life and provide ONOS and BGP peering application as the key building blocks,” said Guru Parulkar, co-founder and executive director of ON.Lab. “We look forward to continuing our relationship with ONF and enabling real progress of open source software in achieving mainstream adoption.”

http://www.opensourcesdn.org
https://www.opennetworking.org

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

ONF Launches Open Source Software Repository

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is launching a new Open Source Software community and code repository, OpenSourceSDN.org. This new site will be a resource for those looking to commercially deploy open SDN solutions, free from vendor lock-in.

“The launch of OpenSourceSDN.org further underscores our commitment to the ongoing commercialization of open source software worldwide,” said Dan Pitt, executive director of the Open Networking Foundation. “We see open source software as a key route to developing de facto standards and fostering multi-vendor interoperability, both of which are top priorities for ONF. Our work in open source software development will continue to be complementary to both our own specifications work and the open source work done by other organizations and we look forward to continued collaboration.”

http://opensourcesdn.org/

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

ONF to Support Open vSwitch, Appoints Principal System Architect

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) announced the appointment of Saurav Das as principal system architect, and the establishment of a new project to build upon the OpenFlow Configuration and Management Protocol (OF-CONFIG) to support Open vSwitch (OVS).

As Principal System Architect, Dr. Saurav brings deep SDN and networking software expertise to support new ONF development projects, working with ONF’s CTO and Software Leadership Councils. Saurav’s background in SDN can be traced back to his doctoral research at Stanford University. Under the direction of Professor Nick McKeown (a member of the ONF Board of Directors), he was part of the research group at Stanford that gave birth to SDN as we know it. His work developed a converged IP/MPLS/Optical WAN architecturally founded on SDN and OpenFlow. Post-graduation, he worked as part of the engineering team at Big Switch Networks, investigating SDN platform scalability in large data center networks.

“Open-source resources provide a tangible foundation from which the industry can quickly implement SDN, rapidly increasing the speed at which open SDN can be leveraged by end users,” said Das. “With this understanding, ONF is placing increased emphasis on open source. Stay tuned – much more is coming from the organization in 2015.”

https://www.opennetworking.org/

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

ONOS: ON.Lab's SDN Open Network Operating System

Earlier this month, the Open Networking Lab (ON.Lab) released its open source SDN Open Network Operating System (ONOS) for Service Providers that enables agile service creation and deployment at scale on any hardware, including white boxes.

See also