Showing posts with label Kaloom. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Kaloom. Show all posts

Thursday, October 15, 2020

Perspective: Growth occurs at the cloud edge

by Hitendra “Sonny” Soni, senior vice president worldwide sales and marketing, Kaloom

Elvis Presley sang the song “If I can dream” in ‘68, inspired by the turmoil a growing nation was going through. In today’s pandemic reality, connectivity has become more important than ever, but innovation needs to take place at multiple levels to get us where we need to be.

When our startup was founded, the assumptions that SDN and NFV would deliver programmability, automation, drive down costs and disrupt vendor lock-in had not yet materialized despite years of effort from the networking community. 

While SDN promised the Net Ops engineer’s dream of a truly programmable network, it initially enabled just a limited amount of additional software control and flexibility. Without programmability, the hardware could only perform the functions it was created with and networking would continue to lag behind the rapid advances made in other cloud technologies such as storage, compute and application development. 

Gartner comments about SDN’s “Plateau of Productivity” on the analyst firm’s famous hype-cycle curve has led to multiple pundit headlines such as “SDN is dead, long live SDN” and my personal favorite “SDN has left the building.” However, these are not just about naming nuances. They represent the true pitfalls of SDN as it was originally intended – specifically taking so long to mature, being difficult to operationalize and not delivering on lowering networking’s costs.  

Whatever you were doing, or wanted to do, in software you couldn’t change what the non-programmable chip/hardware was capable of. This meant that the much-anticipated rapid innovation pace of software development and open source collaboration that were supposed to accelerate networking capabilities were still hamstrung by a years-long hardware product cycle. If I could dream of a truly cloud-native programmable fabric, here are five characteristics that cloud-native edge solutions would look like. 

1. Open Source 

The real vision of SDN and NFV is built on community-based, open-source standards such as those from the IETF, ONF, The Broadband Forum, The Linux Foundation, and many others.

Recent years have seen an entire ecosystem of truly open-source, collaborative communities geared towards solving the challenges created by SDN’s initial vision. In fact, there are so many “.orgs” working on this that it can be confusing for service providers to decide which one to use to address each of its various needs. Today, many of these have joined, merged, or collaborated with the IEEE, Open Networking Foundation (ONF), Apache, Linux and – in the case of Kubernetes – its Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), among others. 

2. Live Truly on the Edge

New 5G-enabled apps require extreme low latency which demands a distributed edge architecture that puts applications close to their data source and end users. We can’t have autonomous vehicles or other mission-critical manufacturing apps experiencing loss of signal, network interruptions or increased latency. The delicacy of their connection to the network must be automatically prioritized. Workloads need to be managed and decisions made at edge-level precision which requires an end-to-end latency below 10 milliseconds. Much of our public cloud infrastructure today is not yet set up for this. 

For example, the latency from New-York to Amazon Web Services or Microsoft Azure in Northern - Virginia is greater than 20 milliseconds. Simply not good enough. The image below, which is taken from The Linux Foundation’s State of the Edge (SOTE) 2020 report, demonstrates the importance of low latency in supporting next-gen applications.

 3. Make Real-Business ‘Cents

At the moment, the 5G business case is simply not justified, and carriers will not deploy true nationwide 5G because there is no demand for it yet and there needs to be an opportunity to monetize. For example, service providers’ revenues from smartphone users running 3G/4G were about $50 per month. However, connected cars will only generate about $1 or $2 per month, and installing 5G requires extreme amounts of upfront investments, not only in antennas but also in the backend servers, storage, and networking switches required to support these apps. The reality is that 5G will requires a 10x reduced total cost of ownership for the infrastructure deployments to be profitable.  

To succeed any new technology must deliver significant economic disruption. One example of this is network slicing, or partitioning network architectures into virtual data centers while using the same shared physical infrastructure. With 5G-enabled secure, end to end, fully isolated network slicing, it’s conceivable that different service providers – for example MVNOs – could share the same physical network resources while maintaining different SLAs and offering differentiated services. They could also share a half- or full rack, depending on how many servers their apps require. This could enable initial 5G service rollouts while minimizing costs, and risks, via shared infrastructure.

4. Be Green

If there is anything this pandemic has taught us, it is that efficiency is king. We all stopped and realized just how much we needed to get by and how much was wasted. As the global manufacturing economy came to an abrupt halt in early 2020, we turned our focus on critical infrastructure. In that light, many local central offices (COs) are nearly maxed-out in terms of available space, power and cooling, leaving little room to support additional rack units (RUs). 

In fact, large regional cloud facilities were not built for the new distributed edge paradigm and service providers’ legacy Central Office (CO) architectures are even more ill-suited for the shift. Containing an odd mishmash of old and new equipment from each decade going back at least 50 years, these facilities are also typically near the limit of their space, power and cooling requirements.

This major buildup to 5G-supported edge infrastructure will have an extremely negative impact on the environment in terms of energy consumption. According to the Linux Foundation’s State of the Edge 2020 report, by 2028 it will consume 102,000 megawatts of power and over $700 billion in cumulative CAPEX will be spent within the next decade on edge IT infrastructure and data center facilities.  We need technology that can dramatically and rapidly reduce the power required to provide these new 5G services and apps to consumers and enterprises. This image, also from the SOTE2020 report, shows the massive need for more power to support 5G and its next-gen apps. 


5. Built on Collaboration

The “edge” is complicated and in many cases cloud players and telcos have yet to fully comprehend how to manage distributed edge locations and the next-generation of applications they will run. In order to truly succeed this dream takes a village to build, where carriers, network operators and cloud-native solution providers work together. Because if we dream it, we can build it. We truly believe in our calling and we may yet get to that promised land. Ok, that is the last Elvis pundit for this post. Thank you very much. 


Hitendra “Sonny” Soni is the Senior Vice President of Worldwide Sales and Marketing at Kaloom. With over 25 years of experience in sales, business development and marketing in the data center and cloud networking, converged infrastructures and management solutions, Sonny is a passionate entrepreneur, who has spent his entire career bringing innovative technology to the market.


Thursday, April 30, 2020

Kaloom’s Cloud Edge Fabric integrates with Red Hat OpenShift for unified edge

Kaloom is collaborating with Red Hat to provide a unified solution for distributed edge computing.

The solution integrates Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Enterprise Linux with Kaloom’s Cloud Edge Fabric, which supports sophisticated services chaining to improve overall networking efficiency. Hybrid 4G and 5G infrastructures can be supported with cloud native network function (CNF) fabric architecture

“We are excited to announce our jointly developed solution with Red Hat which solidifies the Kaloom Cloud Edge Fabric for edge data centers based on open networking principles with Red Hat OpenShift as the basis of a unified solution for network, compute and storage,” said Suresh Krishnan, Chief Technology Officer at Kaloom.

“We are pleased to work with Kaloom to announce a solution designed to deliver production-ready Linux containers and Kubernetes to service providers with Red Hat OpenShift, specifically for edge computing. Our extended collaboration in open source communities shows our shared commitment in moving networking capabilities in cloud native technologies towards an automated, unified approach based on open standards,” said Chris Wright, Chief Technology Officer at Red Hat.

“Edgecore is pleased to collaborate with Kaloom and Red Hat in support of their innovative Cloud Edge Fabric integrated with Red Hat OpenShift. The combined solution running on our open network switches deliver the performance and flexibility required to support complex next generation networks,” said Loren Staley, Chief Technology Officer at Edgecore Networks.

“We see tremendous value in collaborating with Kaloom and Red Hat, as we work together to reduce operational challenges associated with the deployment of edge computing at scale. Our fully integrated, optimized, deployment and management solution, called Lenovo Open Cloud Automation, enables our joint customers to accelerate the implementation of infrastructure, including compute, storage, networking, firmware and software, from days to hours, resulting in up to 5x improvement in deployment times,” said Charles Ferland, Vice President and General Manager, Networking and Communication Service Providers at Lenovo.

Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Kaloom appoints McGinn as Chairman of Board

Kaloom, a start-up offering a programmable and automated data center fabric,  recently appointed Richard A. McGinn as Board Chairman.

McGinn previously served as CEO of VeriFone Systems, one of the world's largest point of sale terminal vendors and a leading provider of payment and commerce solutions, and CEO of Lucent, a multinational telecommunications equipment company. While at Lucent, McGinn oversaw and directed engineering, research and investments of more than $4 billion annually, and was involved in the acquisition of, or investment in, more than 30 technology companies. McGinn was also a founder and Investor of Sky Capital from 2014 to 2016. Additionally, he was a General Partner of M.R. Investment Partners from 2010 to 2014 and of RRE Ventures from 2001 to 2010.

In addition, Kaloom appointed Hitendra Sonny Soni as Senior Vice President of Worldwide Sales and Marketing.  Soni has previously held executive positions at Snaproute/Infoblox, HPE, CliQr/Cisco, ServiceMesh/DXC, VCE, Accelerated Networks/Calix and Xylan/Alcatel-Lucent.


https://www.kaloom.com/

Tuesday, May 7, 2019

Kaloom and Linux Foundation open Virtual Central Office lab

Kaloom, in partnership with Linux Foundation, announced the availability of a Virtual Central Office (VCO) 3.0 lab in Montreal that is designed for multi-vendor Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) deployments at the distributed cloud edge.

The lab offers a unified Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform application infrastructure for Virtual Network Functions/Cloud Native Network Functions (VNF/CNF) vendors to test their applications.

Virtual Central Office (VCO) is a solution for multi-vendor NFV deployments in the traditional telco central office and at the distributed cloud edge. The solution is designed to be used for residential, enterprise and mobile VCO services by telcos and enterprises. The VCO 3.0 initiative, currently under development, defines a cloud native multi-vendor Central Office with an initial focus on mobile services with a lab setup designed for both virtual machine based VNFs and cloud native container-based CNFs in a full 5G architecture.

Kaloom provides a fully automated virtualized CO networking solution together with Red Hat’s NFV infrastructure.

Kaloom’s Software Defined Fabric™ and Cloud Edge Fabric solutions leverage a programmable multi-Tbps fabric to increase the performance and to lower the latency for NFV application servers and storage. It also provides customers a way to program their infrastructure using the open standards-based P4 programming language to add new services quickly. The solution enhances CPU utilization for VNF applications and embeds sophisticated service chaining offload to the data plane to accelerate the overall performance and lower latency even further. Sophisticated end-to-end network slicing is supported natively in the fabric with full tenant isolation down to the hardware level for better security. Network slicing is a key innovative aspect of 5G architectures that provides customers their own virtual network slice for a better quality of experience.

“Our Cloud Edge Fabric solution was designed to address the key requirements for the cloud edge market, such as lowering latency and improving performance at a lower price. We believe that automation, unified VNF/CNF, programmability and network slicing will disrupt the way service providers deploy and manage cloud edge data centers, and we are very excited to demonstrate these capabilities with the community in the VCO 3.0 lab in Montreal,” said Laurent Marchand, CEO at Kaloom.

“We are very pleased to help launch the VCO 3.0 lab in Montreal together with our members. This enables us to bring the open networking community closer together with multiple vendors to test VNFs and CNFs in containers for different 5G, cloud native and edge use cases, and demos” said Heather Kirksey, vice president, community and ecosystem development, the Linux Foundation.

https://www.kaloom.com/press-release-vco3-lab-availability?utm_content=91139926


Thursday, November 15, 2018

Kaloom raises $10 million for its software-defined fabric for whiteboxes

Kaloom, a start-up based in Montreal with offices in Santa Clara, California, announced $10 million in Series A1 funding for its Software Defined Fabric (SDF) for automating and optimizing data center networks based on open networking white box switches.

The latest financing was led by the Fonds de solidarité FTQ, and Somel Investments, with the participation from MBUZZ Investments. This cash infusion brings Kaloom’s total investments to $20.7 million.

“We see a strong need among current beta and other potential customers to do something ‘bottom up’ with the networking fabric, where the switches self-discover and self-provision themselves automatically in a network that ultimately supports programmability,” said Laurent Marchand, CEO and founder of Kaloom. “The latest funding round is validation of Kaloom’s approach and where we believe the industry is moving; enabling us to grow faster than planned and respond to growing customer demand.”

“In a very short period, Kaloom has developed world class software for data centers. We are excited to see such strong interest in the company and its solution and see a bright future with Kaloom. After our initial investment for Kaloom’s launch in 2017, we are pleased to continue to support the company’s growth,” said Gaétan Morin, President and CEO of the Fonds de solidarité FTQ.

Kaloom also announced tha appointment of Mike Rymkiewicz as its new vice president of sales, and Thomas Eklund as Kaloom’s vice president of marketing.

  • Kaloom's SDF, which is designed to virtualize the data center, leverages P4-based programming capabilities initially in switching silicon from Barefoot Networks. A physical data center can be partitioned into multiple independent and fully isolated virtual data centers (vDCs). Each vDC operates with its own Virtual Fabric (vFabric), which can host millions of IPv4 or IPv6 based tenant networks. Its software-defined fabric offer interfaces to standard orchestration systems and SDN controllers such as Openstack (ML2), Kubernetes Container Networking Interface (CNI) and OpenDaylight (NETCONF). Initially, supported white boxes include Accton, Delta and Foxconn, which have been designed for hyperscale and distributed data centers. The SDF features self-forming and self-discovery capabilities, as well as zero-touch provisioning of the virtual network and virtual components with automated software upgrades.
  • The Kaloom Software Defined Product Family consists of the following components:
    Kaloom Software Defined Fabric
    Kaloom vRouter
    Kaloom vSwitch
    Kaloom vGW (virtual gateway)


Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Kaloom collaborates with Red Hat on a Virtual Central Office for NFV

Kaloom, a start-up based in Montreal with offices in Santa Clara, California, has collaborated with Red Hat around the launch of the Red Hat virtual central office solution, a Virtual Central Office (VCO) solution for multivendor NFV deployments at the edge.

Kaloom has developed a Software Defined Fabric (SDF) for automating and optimizing data center networks based on open networking white box switches.

Kaloom's SDF, which is designed to virtualize the data center, leverages P4-based programming capabilities initially in switching silicon from Barefoot Networks. A physical data center can be partitioned into multiple independent and fully isolated virtual data centers (vDCs). Each vDC operates with its own Virtual Fabric (vFabric), which can host millions of IPv4 or IPv6 based tenant networks.

The joint solution with Red Hat leverages Kaloom’s programmable fabric to help increase the performance and lower the latency for NFV applications. Specifically, Kaloom said its solution enhances CPU utilization for virtual network function (VNF) applications by offloading sophisticated service chaining functionality and embedding it into the data plane to accelerate overall performance and lower latency. It offers integrated service chaining offload, virtual cloud router and virtual switch capabilities. It also provides customers with a way to program their infrastructure using the open standards-based P4 programming language to add new services and capabilities.

“We see a strong need among current beta and other potential customers to have an open multivendor NFV solution. Our advanced service chaining capabilities significantly increase performance and lower latency delivering better overall network performance and lower costs for data center operators,” said Laurent Marchand, CEO and founder of Kaloom. “Red Hat is a great partner for us to bring this solution to market.”

“As more mobile network operators look to embrace the role of a modern open telecommunications service provider, moving services from the core network closer to customers by virtualizing edge networks becomes an important consideration,” said Darrell Jordan-Smith, Vice President, Global Information and Communications Technology at Red Hat. “Red Hat virtual central office solution is designed to provide both a path for service providers to follow and an open pluggable framework upon which to build their next generation services by leveraging our partner ecosystem's strengths and technologies.”

http://www.kaloom.com