Showing posts with label Huawei. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Huawei. Show all posts

Thursday, October 22, 2020

Huawei's growth rate slows to 10%

Huawei reported revenue of CNY671.3 billion (approximately US$100.42 billion) for the first three quarters of 2020, an increase of 9.9% over the same period last year. The company said it achieved a net profit margin in this period was 8.0%, in line with its expectations.

Huawei also said its global supply chain is being put "under intense pressure and its production and operations face significant challenges" due to COVID-19. 

https://www.huawei.com/en/news/2020/10/huawei-announces-q3-2020-business-results-business-performance

Huawei reports a 13% increase in 1H sales to US$64.9 biliion

The company issued the following statement: "As countries around the globe are grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic, information and communications technologies (ICT) have become not only a crucial tool for combatting the virus, but also an engine for economic recovery. Huawei reiterated its commitment to working with carriers and industry partners to maintain stable network operations, accelerate digital transformation, and support efforts to contain local outbreaks and reopen local economies."

Huawei reported overall revenue of CNY454 billion (approx. US$64.9 billion) in revenue for the first half of 2020, a 13.1% increase year-on-year, with a net profit margin of 9.2%.

Huawei's carrier, enterprise, and consumer businesses achieved CNY159.6 billion, CNY36.3 billion, and CNY255.8 billion in revenue, respectively.  "The complex external environment makes open collaboration and trust in global value chains more important than ever. Huawei has promised to continue fulfilling its obligations to customers and suppliers, and to survive, forge ahead, and contribute to the global digital economy and technological development, no matter what future challenges the company faces."

Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Sweden bans Huawei and ZTE for 5G infrastructure

The Swedish Post and Telecom Authority (PTS) issued new license conditions that ban the use of infrastructure products from Huawei or ZTE in new 5G installations in the 2.3 GHz and 3.5 GHz bands.  Four carriers have been approved to participate in the auction for these bands: Hi3G Access, Net4Mobility, Telia Sverige and Teracom.

The Swedish regulatory authority said if existing infrastructure for central functions is to be used to provide services in the concerned frequency bands, products from Huawei and ZTE must be phased out 1 January 2025 at the latest. A further condition is that if central functions are dependant of staff or functions placed in foreign countries, such dependencies must be phased out and, if necessary, be replaced by functions or staff placed in Sweden. This must be completed by 1 January 2025.

https://www.pts.se/en/news/press-releases/2020/four-companies-approved-for-participation-in-the-3.5-ghz-and-2.3-ghz-auctions/


Thursday, October 8, 2020

UK's Defence Committee urges faster removal of Huawei kit

 There is clear evidence of collusion between Huawei and the Chinese state, according to a new report issued by the UK's Defence Select Committee, which states that the goal of removing Huawei from the UK’s 5G networks by 2027 may need to be moved forward. The Committee concludes that "developments could necessitate this date being moved forward, potentially to 2025 which could be considered economically feasible."

Chair of the Defence Committee, Tobias Ellwood MP, writes: "Protecting the public and preserving our nation’s security are amongst the principle responsibilities of Government. The decision to embed a technology that compromises this would constitute a gross dereliction of these duties.

"The West must urgently unite to advance a counterweight to China’s tech dominance. As every aspect of our lives becomes increasingly reliant on access to data movement we must develop a feasible, practical and cost-effective alternative to the cheap, high-tech solutions which can be preyed upon and which come stooped with conditions which ensnare a state into long-term allegiance to China.

"We must not surrender our national security for the sake of short-term technological development. This is a false and wholly unnecessary trade off. A new D10 alliance, that unites the world’s ten strongest democracies, would provide a viable alternative foundation to the technological might of authoritarian states, whose true motives are, at times, murky. Democracies the world over are waking up to the dangers of new technology from overseas, that could inadvertently provide hostile states access to sensitive information through the backdoor."

https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/24/defence-committee/news/119865/the-security-of-5g-we-must-not-surrender-our-national-security-for-the-sake-of-shortterm-technological-development/

Thursday, October 1, 2020

UK's Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre cites flaws

 The UK's Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre (HCSEC) Oversight Board issued its sixth annual report concerning risks arising from the involvement of Huawei in parts of the

United Kingdom’s critical national infrastructure. The report discusses a security flaw of "national significance" with currently deployed equipment and well as systemic problems in the way Huawei has mitigated previous problems.

The HCSEC report states it "has not yet seen anything to give it confidence in Huawei’s capacity to successfully complete the elements of its transformation programme that it has proposed as a means of addressing these underlying defects. The Board will require sustained evidence of better software engineering and cyber security quality verified by HCSEC and NCSC."

In addition, the Oversight Board stated it "can only provide limited assurance that all risks to UK national security from Huawei’s involvement in the UK’s critical networks can be sufficiently mitigated long-term."

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/huawei-cyber-security-evaluation-centre-oversight-board-annual-report-2020




Sunday, September 13, 2020

Huawei and China Unicom hit 4.7 Gbps per cell with indoor MIMO

Huawei and China Unicom achieved a peak rate of up to 4.7 Gbps for cells with 100 MHz bandwidth in a test of 5G indoor distributed Massive MIMO

This indoor distributed Massive MIMO test was deployed and verified in the China's National Center for the Performing Arts (NCPA) using multiple terminals, and results showed that the downlink peak rate reached 4.7 Gbps in 100 MHz C-band cells.

Dr. Li Fuchang, Director of the Wireless Technology Research Center of China Unicom Research Institute, said: "At China Unicom, we are committed to improving the quality of products and services through innovation to bring intelligent technologies to customer's lives and increase the efficiency of production for businesses. To achieve this goal, China Unicom has been working with Huawei to innovate on the indoor distributed massive MIMO technology. With the rapid development of user bases and applications, 5G traffic requirements will increase also rapidly. This solution will help us pursue flexible capacity expansion on live networks, laying a solid technological foundation for continuing to deliver premium 5G experience for customers and diversifying 5G vertical applications for various businesses."

 technology.

The indoor distributed Massive MIMO technology is one of the innovative applications implemented in the 5G Capital project, which was launched last year in Beijing by Huawei and China Unicom to demonstrate the transformative power of 5G.

Monday, September 7, 2020

SCMP: Huawei seeks to raise fresh funds from employees

Huawei has launched an internal funding program that is selling virtual shares to employees, according to South China Morning Post.  The program is seen as a way for Huawei to raise funds for its R&D programs amidst increasing pressure from U.S. sanctions. Huawei did not confirm the report.

https://www.scmp.com/tech/big-tech/article/3100548/huawei-seeks-raise-fresh-funds-employees-amid-us-trade-sanctions

Monday, August 31, 2020

NeoPhotonics cites business impact from Huawei sanctions

NeoPhotonics said the recent tightening of restriction on Huawei and its affiliates by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) will have an impact on its financial performance.

In an investor update, NeoPhotonics stated that it is on track to achieve to meet the targts provided on August 4, 2020.  Shipments to Huawei are contributing approximately $40 million of revenue to NeoPhotonics in the current quarter. Beyond the third quarter, the NeoPhotonics is still assessing the full impact of the current BIS restrictions.

“Despite the near-term revenue impact resulting from the recent BIS restrictions, demand for our products broadly remains strong, driven by expanding high speed capacities, hyper-scale data center interconnects, network edge provisioning for increased cloud service usage and remote working,” said Tim Jenks, Chairman and CEO of NeoPhotonics. “We remain excited about the growth prospects ahead of us. In particular, our highest speed over distance products for 400G and above applications continue to gain traction with leading network equipment manufacturers and are expected to represent more than 20% of total revenue in 2020, after only two years in the market. Of note, revenue from customers beyond Huawei is expected to grow 40-50% over the next year independent of potential customer share shifts. Coupled with the upcoming 400ZR and 400ZR+ high speed module opportunity which is expected to begin volume production in 2H 2021, the end market for these products, as defined by high speed ports, is forecasted to increase at an 80% five-year compounded annual growth rate through 2024,” continued Mr. Jenks.

“Beyond topline growth, we must also ensure our operations remain aligned with the demand outlook and pursue appropriate expense adjustments and structural actions to mitigate the impact of revenue declines. We are fortunate to have entered this period with both a strong financial position and a management team with a demonstrated track record of taking the necessary actions to navigate uncertain times. Through the continued growth of our existing product lines and the ability to pull operational levers as needed, we feel confident in our ability to return to profitability by the end of 2021 with a greater level of diversity across our customer base,” concluded Mr. Jenks.

https://ir.neophotonics.com/news-releases/news-release-details/neophotonics-provides-business-update-following-recent-us

U.S. further restricts Huawei's access to components

The U.S. Department of Commerce added further restrictions on Huawei Technologies (Huawei) and its non-U.S. affiliates to prevent access to electronic components and other U.S. developed technologies.

Specifically, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) in the Department of Commerce added another 38 Huawei affiliates to the Entity List, which imposes a license requirement for all items subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) and modified four existing Huawei Entity List entries. BIS also imposed license requirements on any transaction involving items subject to Commerce export control jurisdiction where a party on the Entity List is involved, such as when Huawei (or other Entity List entities) acts as a purchaser, intermediate, or end user.

The restrictions have immediate effect. The Department of Commerce said this amendment further restricts Huawei from obtaining foreign made chips developed or produced from U.S. software or technology to the same degree as comparable U.S. chips.

“Huawei and its foreign affiliates have extended their efforts to obtain advanced semiconductors developed or produced from U.S. software and technology in order to fulfill the policy objectives of the Chinese Communist Party,” said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. “As we have restricted its access to U.S. technology, Huawei and its affiliates have worked through third parties to harness U.S. technology in a manner that undermines U.S. national security and foreign policy interests. This multi-pronged action demonstrates our continuing commitment to impede Huawei’s ability to do so.”

https://www.commerce.gov/news/press-releases/2020/08/commerce-department-further-restricts-huawei-access-us-technology-and

Sunday, August 30, 2020

Perspective: Implications of the Huawei Ban

by Brian Klaff, Marketing Director, Ethernity Networks

The banning of Huawei equipment from the 5G core networks of operators in the U.S., the U.K., and a number of other countries across the world is helping to shake up the industry and raise questions about 5G’s deployment future.

Leaving aside the politics, trade disputes, Coronavirus issues, and cybersecurity concerns, it’s worth taking a look at how we got to where we are today from a networking standpoint. How did operators become so dependent on Huawei, and what are their alternatives? What does all this mean for 5G and its users?

Huawei is an ASIC (applied specific integrated circuit) manufacturer, offering these ASIC-based appliances throughout the telecom broadband network. ASICs offer excellent performance at low up-front cost, and Huawei was known as a provider of end-to-end ASIC-based systems at especially low prices.  That drew many telecom operators to Huawei as their primary hardware provider.

Because 4G telecom networks are based on a traditional, monolithic infrastructure, the network core does the heavy lifting, delivering all the bandwidth necessary to run today’s end user applications. As such, it made sense for operators to rely heavily on a single primary hardware provider delivering high performance for a reasonable price.

There is certainly a big downside to this approach.  Huawei’s network is proprietary with no interoperability with other companies’ hardware. It’s an all or nothing decision when it comes to using Huawei equipment.

There is also a price to pay in the long run for choosing an ASIC-based system (not just Huawei’s).  ASICs are limited to their initial programming and must be replaced after field deployment every time there is a new protocol, security algorithm, or feature that becomes indispensable. As British operators are finding out, replacing field-deployed hardware is a proposition that is extremely expensive. So the low up-front cost of choosing Huawei can have steep long-term repercussions.


Why Huawei became problematic from a networking perspective
What worked for 4G isn’t necessarily the best in 5G.  Whereas 4G relied so much on performance from the core, 5G seeks higher bandwidth and lower latency by moving much of that performance to the edge of the network.  The 5G specification calls for a more open, disaggregated network, one that performs under the varying circumstances of the network edge with the ability to connect different elements of the network from different vendors.  When one company maintains so much control over an operator’s network and its security, there is reason for concern. Huawei’s vendor-locked monolithic offering scares politicians, and maybe even the telecom operators themselves.

As operators seek to take back control of their networks by diversifying their network hardware providers, the trend is to eschew Huawei in favor of alternatives.  Even in China, the three major operators have committed to more open networks, and they are also weaning themselves off Huawei in certain areas of their 5G deployments, for example by initiating the Open UPF program.

Operators’ options

Perhaps the easiest option for telecom operators is to swap in another ASIC manufacturer, such as ZTE, Samsung, Nokia, or Ericsson, for Huawei.  This will guarantee similar performance and be relatively inexpensive in the short term, but it doesn’t solve the issue of closed, inflexible networks.
One possible solution is virtualization, which has already overhauled data centers and can ensure the flexibility to choose functionalities and features from a wide range of software providers using standard, off-the-shelf commodity hardware.  NFV (network function virtualization) has been promised for many years already, but with 5G it is becoming a necessity in telecom.

By implementing networking and security functions through software instead of rigid hardware, operators gain the flexibility to choose the best-in-class solution for each network component regardless of vendor. They also gain the programmability to easily adapt to new protocols, algorithms, and features.  Software providers such as MetaSwitch, Mavenir, AltioStar, and Affirmed can offer NFV solutions to be run on CPUs on commercial off-the-shelf servers.

Even some of the traditional ASIC manufacturers, such as Toshiba, Nokia, and Ericsson, have recognized this need for agility.  They have started to embrace Open RAN (Radio-Access Network), and they are creating software-based solutions to address that specific segment of the 5G network.

The problem with a software-only approach is that the software runs on CPUs, which were designed to handle compute and control functions, not intensive networking and security functions.  As such, the performance of software-only networking solutions suffers greatly compared to ASICs, and it takes dozens of CPU cores to achieve similar performance.  This becomes exceedingly expensive, and even worse, it requires a lot of physical space and power, valuable commodities at the edge of the network.

A better option, one that combines the best of both worlds, is to opt for disaggregated, open networks using FPGA SmartNICs to handle the networking and security functions.  FPGAs (field-programmable gate arrays) are hardware processors especially efficient in handling many data processing tasks in parallel that are reprogrammable after being field-deployed.

By incorporating an FPGA onto a network adapter, it becomes possible to offload CPU-intensive data processing functions to optimized hardware while maintaining the flexibility of programmable software solutions. This gives operators ASIC-like performance and NFV-like agility in a compact network card that fits into a commercial off-the-shelf server. It reduces the number of required CPU cores to gain significant savings in capital expense, physical space, and power at the network edge.  For example, Ethernity Networks offers an FPGA SmartNIC that includes a complete router-on-NIC that reduces CAPEX costs on 5G User Plane Functionality (UPF) components by up to 80%.

What this means for 5G

A dirty little secret that the telecom industry doesn’t want you to know is that the 5G rollouts most local operators have been touting for the past year or so haven’t really been true 5G.   They have been what is commonly referred to as “4G Evolved,” applying some 5G principles to the 4G infrastructure to produce better-than-4G performance – but not yet reaching the level that 5G promises.

Operators were relying on their Huawei (or other ASIC-based) network equipment without fully committing to the necessary changes to bring about the 5G revolution.  In that regard, the Huawei ban represents a golden opportunity to hasten the implementation of true 5G networks.

5G infrastructure is a green field, with virtually no carry-over from legacy equipment.  As such, operators can now consider how to replace Huawei with an eye to the future, with less concern about the expense involved. 

True 5G is coming. There is no doubt.   Europe and North America lag behind Southeast Asia in mass 5G deployments, but there is still time to make the hard decisions that will determine the makeup of the networks.  The easy and less expensive route – simply turning to another ASIC-based solution provider – will waste the opportunity to disaggregate and bring out the full potential of 5G.

Instead, telecom operators should consider their options thoroughly and choose their vendors based not only on up-front cost, but on the goal of a network that is high-performance, flexible, long-term cost-efficient, and future-proof. To avoid the possibility that they will need to replace field-deployed 5G components in the next few years, they should opt for an open and programmable solution now.

Effects on end user experience

It has been suggested that only an ASIC provider such as Nokia or Ericsson can replace what Huawei offered in terms of local exchange and street cabinet broadband equipment, but that is not true.  FPGA-based solutions are ideal for this as well, offering high networking and security performance with flexibility to accommodate various protocol configurations, including DSL and passive optical network (PON), which are used for last-mile data transfer.

Moreover, the need to reduce power and physical space is a far more critical requirement at the network edge than in a typical data center, as edge sites have very limited physical space and a fixed power envelope.  An FPGA-based edge appliance can address all the performance and security requirements of broadband aggregation in a compact, power-efficient device.

If operators simply replace Huawei with another ASIC provider, the result will be similar network performance.  But while there may be no deterioration of service, the network would remain closed and rigid.  If they opt for software-only solutions to replace Huawei, they get open, multi-vendor networks but may struggle to achieve similar performance cost-effectively or meet timelines for full deployment.  This could lead to a deterioration of service or higher costs for end users.

But if providers choose solutions that rely on FPGA SmartNICs they can achieve both high performance and open, agile networks.  This would maintain quality of service, lower costs for both operators and subscribers, and shorten time-to-market.  That is why in China –  which is significantly ahead of North America and Europe in 5G deployment – all three of the primary mobile operators are insisting on FPGA SmartNIC solutions for their 5G UPF implementations.

Brian Klaff is the Marketing Director at Ethernity Networks.  With over 20 years of experience, Brian has concentrated on product marketing for the networking hardware industry since 2013, with special emphasis on the telecom sector. Prior to Ethernity, he held senior communications positions at Mellanox and Amdocs.

Sunday, August 23, 2020

China Telecom tests Huawei's 5G Super Uplink + Downlink CA

China Telecom Shenzhen is testing 5G Super Uplink and dual carrier aggregation (CA) downlink technology from Huawei.

The pilot site uses 200 MHz 3.5 GHz TDD spectrum and 20 MHz 2.1 GHz FDD spectrum in the uplink. Single-user concurrent tests were completed in standalone (SA) networking mode. The results of the test showed that the average uplink rate reached 470 Mbps and the average downlink rate 2.43 Gbps, which are approximately 1.3 times and double that with a single 100 MHz bandwidth, respectively.

Huawei claims 5G Super Uplink has notable advantages over uplink CA. Super Uplink enables integrated uplink scheduling between two uplink carriers in one cell. This scheduling mechanism is more efficient than uplink CA implemented between two cells. In addition, uplink and downlink bands are decoupled, enabling downlink carriers to be flexibly added to adapt to data traffic requirements. For example, CA can be disabled or implemented within one band or between two bands. As uplink CA depends on downlink CA and its bands must be a subset of downlink CA bands, uplink CA cannot be used in the cases of asymmetric uplink-only bands, further highlighting the greater flexibility of Super Uplink.

https://www.huawei.com/us/news/2020/8/shenzhen-telecom-5g-superuplink-dc

Monday, August 17, 2020

U.S. further restricts Huawei's access to components

The U.S. Department of Commerce added further restrictions on Huawei Technologies (Huawei) and its non-U.S. affiliates to prevent access to electronic components and other U.S. developed technologies.

Specifically, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) in the Department of Commerce added another 38 Huawei affiliates to the Entity List, which imposes a license requirement for all items subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) and modified four existing Huawei Entity List entries. BIS also imposed license requirements on any transaction involving items subject to Commerce export control jurisdiction where a party on the Entity List is involved, such as when Huawei (or other Entity List entities) acts as a purchaser, intermediate, or end user.

The restrictions have immediate effect. The Department of Commerce said this amendment further restricts Huawei from obtaining foreign made chips developed or produced from U.S. software or technology to the same degree as comparable U.S. chips.

“Huawei and its foreign affiliates have extended their efforts to obtain advanced semiconductors developed or produced from U.S. software and technology in order to fulfill the policy objectives of the Chinese Communist Party,” said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. “As we have restricted its access to U.S. technology, Huawei and its affiliates have worked through third parties to harness U.S. technology in a manner that undermines U.S. national security and foreign policy interests. This multi-pronged action demonstrates our continuing commitment to impede Huawei’s ability to do so.”

https://www.commerce.gov/news/press-releases/2020/08/commerce-department-further-restricts-huawei-access-us-technology-and

U.S. tightens semiconductor restrictions on Huawei

U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) issued new rules aimed at cutting off Huawei's access to advanced semiconductors designed or fabricated using U.S. technology or software in other countries.

Specifically, BIS is amending its longstanding foreign-produced direct product rule and the Entity List to narrowly and strategically target Huawei’s acquisition of semiconductors that are the direct product of certain U.S. software and technology.

The following foreign-produced items will now be subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR):

  • Items, such as semiconductor designs, when produced by Huawei and its affiliates on the Entity List (e.g., HiSilicon), that are the direct product of certain U.S. Commerce Control List (CCL) software and technology; and
  • Items, such as chipsets, when produced from the design specifications of Huawei or an affiliate on the Entity List (e.g., HiSilicon), that are the direct product of certain CCL semiconductor manufacturing equipment located outside the United States.  Such foreign-produced items will only require a license when there is knowledge that they are destined for reexport, export from abroad, or transfer (in-country) to Huawei or any of its affiliates on the Entity List.

To prevent immediate adverse economic impacts on foreign foundries utilizing U.S. semiconductor manufacturing equipment that have initiated any production step for items based on Huawei design specifications as of May 15, 2020, such foreign-produced items are not subject to these new licensing requirements so long as they are reexported, exported from abroad, or transferred (in-country) by 120 days from the effective date.

Sunday, August 9, 2020

Huawei expects production of its Kirin 5G silicon to end by Sept 15

Huawei has confirmed that the production of its 5G Kirin chipset by TSMC will end in the coming weeks. Speaking at an industry event in Shenzhen, Yu Chengdong, CEO of Huawei’s Consumer Business Unit, said: “Unfortunately, in the second round of U.S. sanctions, our chip producers only accepted orders until May 15. Production will close on Sept. 15,” Yu said at a conference August 7th. “This year may be the last generation of Huawei Kirin high-end chips.”

Huawei’s HiSilicon division will also not be able to produce its AI chipsets developed or fabricated using U.S. sanctioned technology, including design tools and libraries from Cadence or Synopsys.


Wednesday, July 22, 2020

Huawei and partners establish 4G/5G FWA Technology Forum

Huawei and 20 industrial partners jointly announced the establishment of the 4G/5G FWA Technology Forum as a platform that convenes industrial and ecosystem partners to jointly promote the rapid development of 4G and 5G FWA technologies.

Participating companies include ASR, Atel, Esound, Fibocom, FROG, GOSUNCN, HAIOT, Lintron, MaxComm, MobiWire, MOBOT, Neoway, NOTION, QUECTEL, Sequans, Tigercel, Tozed Kangwei, UNISOC, and Zmtel.

According to the joint declaration, the forum will serve to help:

  • Share trends in the industry, identify directions in technical development, accumulate successful experiences, and overcome business challenges.
  • Improve the 4G and 5G FWA technologies required to provide wireless broadband connection solutions with increased performance and cost-effectiveness.
  • Enhance the collaboration between FWA solution providers and mobile network operators to improve the industry's ecosystem and ensure business success.
  • Promote the success of the FWA industry to accelerate the provisioning of broadband access to anyone, anywhere, with the goal of "connecting the other half" of the world's population.


Zhang Yiqu, General Manager of WTTx Product Line, said in his speech: "Almost 50% of the world's population is still outside the scope of Internet coverage. This represents both enormous challenges and huge market potentials that require the entire industry to come together to develop solutions. Through the 4G/5G FWA Technology Forum, Huawei is excited to collaborate with partners to accelerate the deployment of 4G and 5G FWA and contribute to "connecting the other half" of the world's population. This will be a great achievement for the FWA industry in the new era of wireless home broadband."

Monday, July 20, 2020

South Africa's rain launches Stand Alone 5G with Huawei

rain, South Africa’s data-only mobile network, launched the first Standalone 5G (SA 5G) network in the country using equipment from Huawei.

rain's Standalone 5G is currently available in Cape Town covering areas including Sea Point in Cape Town, Claremont, Goodwood, Bellville, Durbanville, and Cape Town City Centre.

"Standalone 5G will further improve 5G network performance with increased the uplink rate, lower latency, and improved reliability, ushering in high-end cloud VR and cloud gaming services, more diversified enterprise and home broadband services, " said rain Chief Marketing Officer Khaya Dlanga.

"SA 5G will demonstrate how 5G is powerful in realizing South Africa’s 4IR future. Powered by Huawei’s world’s leading 5G solutions, our SA 5G will enable the industries ‘digital transformation in the future, such as smart healthcare, smart ports, smart mining and smart manufacturing in South Africa. We will work with the trustworthy strategic partner to further expand our 5G networks and bring the best service and experience to our customers," Khaya added.

WSJ: China May Retaliate Against Nokia and Ericsson

Chinese Commerce Ministry is considering imposing export controls on Nokia and Ericsson China-made products if the EU decides to ban Huawei from participating in 5G deployments, according to The Wall Street Journal. This follows the new restrictions on Huawei imposed by the UK. The U.S. government is increasing its campaign to get other European countries to restrict Huawei.


https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-may-retaliate-against-nokia-and-ericsson-if-eu-countries-move-to-ban-huawei-11595250557

Tuesday, July 14, 2020

UK confirms ban on Huawei in 5G and broadband infrastructure

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has deciced to ban the purchase of Huawei equipment in 5G infrastructure in the UK after December 2020 and that already deployed equipment must be removed by 2027. The decision follows a technical review by the National Cyber Security Centre in response to U.S. sanctions against Huawei, and strengthens the previous partial-ban announced in January.

The NCSC reasoned that due to the U.S. sanctions, Huawei will need to reconfigure its supply chain and that security confidence could not be established with this unknown factor. The government is urging all UK operators to stop buying Huawei equipment immediately ahead of the legal ban at the end of the year.

For the UK's fixed access networks, where Huawei has been a supplier since 2005, the government isd advising full fibre operators to transition away from purchasing new Huawei equipment. A technical consultation will determine the transition timetable, but this period is expected to last no longer than two years.

Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden states: "5G will be transformative for our country, but only if we have confidence in the security and resilience of the infrastructure it is built upon. Following US sanctions against Huawei and updated technical advice from our cyber experts, the government has decided it is necessary to ban Huawei from our 5G networks. No new kit is to be added from January 2021, and UK 5G networks will be Huawei free by the end of 2027. This decisive move provides the industry with the clarity and certainty it needs to get on with delivering 5G across the UK. By the time of the next election we will have implemented in law an irreversible path for the complete removal of Huawei equipment from our 5G networks."

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/huawei-to-be-removed-from-uk-5g-networks-by-2027

Huawei reports a 13% increase in 1H sales to US$64.9 biliion

Huawei reported overall revenue of CNY454 billion (approx. US$64.9 billion) in revenue for the first half of 2020, a 13.1% increase year-on-year, with a net profit margin of 9.2%.

Huawei's carrier, enterprise, and consumer businesses achieved CNY159.6 billion, CNY36.3 billion, and CNY255.8 billion in revenue, respectively.

The company issued the following statement: "As countries around the globe are grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic, information and communications technologies (ICT) have become not only a crucial tool for combatting the virus, but also an engine for economic recovery. Huawei reiterated its commitment to working with carriers and industry partners to maintain stable network operations, accelerate digital transformation, and support efforts to contain local outbreaks and reopen local economies."

"The complex external environment makes open collaboration and trust in global value chains more important than ever. Huawei has promised to continue fulfilling its obligations to customers and suppliers, and to survive, forge ahead, and contribute to the global digital economy and technological development, no matter what future challenges the company faces."

Tuesday, June 30, 2020

FCC designates Huawei and ZTE as National Security Threats

The FCC officially designated Huawei and ZTE, as well as their parents, affiliates, and subsidiaries, as national security threats.

As a result of the designation, money from the FCC’s $8.3 billion a year Universal Service Fund may no longer be used to purchase, obtain, maintain, improve, modify, or otherwise support any equipment or services produced or provided by either company. 

“With today’s Orders, and based on the overwhelming weight of evidence, the Bureau has designated Huawei and ZTE as national security risks to America’s communications networks—and to our 5G future,” said FCC Chairman Ajit Pai.  “Both companies have close ties to the Chinese Communist Party and China’s military apparatus, and both companies are broadly subject to Chinese law obligating them to cooperate with the country’s intelligence services.  The Bureau also took into account the findings and actions of Congress, the Executive Branch, the intelligence community, our allies, and communications service providers in other countries.  We cannot and will not allow the Chinese Communist Party to exploit network vulnerabilities and compromise our critical communications infrastructure.  Today’s action will also protect the FCC’s Universal Service Fund—money that comes from fees paid by American consumers and businesses on their phone bills—from being used to underwrite these suppliers, which threaten our national security.”


  • In November 2019, the FCC unanimously adopted a ban on the use of universal service support to purchase, obtain, or maintain any equipment or services produced or provided by companies posing a national security threat to the integrity of communications networks or the communications supply chain.  


Sunday, June 28, 2020

Huawei moves forward with Optoelectronics Centre in Cambridge, UK

Huawei confirmed plans to invest £1 billion in the first phase a new Optoelectornics RD & manufacturing centre in Cambridge, UK.

In 2018, Huawei acquired 500 acres of land at the former Spicers paper mill, located to the west of Sawston. The site includes over 50 acres of brownfield land.

This next phase of the project includes construction of 50,000 square meters of facilities across nine acres of land and will directly create around 400 local jobs.

Once fully operational, Huawei said this new facility will become the international headquarters of its optoelectronics business. The facility will ocus on the research, development, and manufacturing of optical devices and modules.

"The UK is home to a vibrant and open market, as well as some of the best talent the world has to offer," said Victor Zhang, Vice President of Huawei. "It's the perfect location for this integrated innovation campus. Through close collaboration with research institutes, universities, and local industry, we want to advance optical communications technology for the industry as a whole, while doing our part to support the UK's broader Industrial Strategy. Ultimately, we want to help enshrine the UK's leading position in optoelectronics and promote UK tech on a global scale.

Thursday, June 25, 2020

Canada's PM rejects calls to end extradition proceedings of Huawei exec

In a press briefing on Thursday, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he would not move to end extradition proceedings to the U.S. of Meng Wanzhou, Huawei's CFO, in exchange for the release of two Canadians being held by the government of China.

“If countries around the world, including China, realize that by arbitrarily arresting random Canadians they can get what they want out of Canada, politically, well that makes an awful lot more Canadians who travel around the world vulnerable,” stated Trudeau.

Sunday, June 21, 2020

India looks to limit Huawei and ZTE in infrastructure

Amid ongoing border tensions, the government of India is likely to restrict the role of Chinese vendors, specifically Huawei and ZTE, in future infrastructure projects.

The Economic Times (ET) reported that the government will restrict a tender by state-owned BSNL to expand its 4G footprint to exclude Huawei and ZTE. Furthermore, Jio is said to be making progress with home-grown 5G technology and would also likely exclude Chinese vendors going forward.


https://www.sundayguardianlive.com/news/dependence-china-telecom-sector-makes-india-vulnerable