Showing posts with label Hawaiki. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hawaiki. Show all posts

Monday, December 2, 2019

Hawaiki subsea cable to extend to New Caledonia

Hawaiki Submarine Cable announced a multi-million dollar contract to connect its transpacific cable system to New Caledonia , including a subsea branch to the capital city of Noumea.

The new cable, dubbed Tomoo, benefits from a customized network design, including connection of both New Caledonia’s Main Island and Isle of Pines. Tomoo is scheduled for completion by 2021.

The Hawaiki cable system recently celebrated the one-year anniversary of its connection to American Samoa. In that short time, the US territory has reported a 10-times increase in internet speeds and an exponential increase in business and residential connections.

“Thanks to SCCI and the Tomoo cable, New Caledonia will be able to enjoy the multiple benefits of Hawaiki’s international connectivity and boost the development of its digital economy, both locally and in the Pacific region,” said Hawaiki chief sales officer, Virginie Frouin.

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Hawaiki activates Los Angeles branch on its transpacific cable

Hawaiki Submarine Cable activated a new direct route to Los Angeles for its transpacific network linking Australia, New Zealand and the United States.

The new route – based on the most easterly segment of the SEA-US cable – completes Hawaiki’s existing links to the United States, including Hillsboro, Seattle and Hawaii. Los Angeles becomes Hawaiki’s third PoP on the US West coast.

The new route adds resiliency to the system and cuts latency between Sydney and Los Angelea.

“As demand for capacity continues to rise sharply, customers are constantly looking for versatile connectivity solutions. This expansion marks an important milestone for Hawaiki as it both strengthens our position in the US market and greatly enhances our network flexibility,” said Hawaiki CEO, Remi Galasso.


  • Launched in July 2018, the Hawaiki transpacific cable is a 15,000 km fibre optic deep-sea, carrier-neutral cable with a design capacity of 67 Tbps. Hawaiki is the fastest and largest capacity link connecting Australia and New Zealand to Hawaii and mainland United States.

Monday, September 24, 2018

Hawaiki selects Ciena's GeoMesh Extreme to upgrade transpacific system to 67 Tbps

Hawaiki Submarine Cable has selected Ciena’s GeoMesh Extreme solution based on Waveserver Ai and various packet-optical networking platforms to upgrade capacity on its new subsea network serving Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific Islands and the United States. The 15,000-km Hawaiki cable, which began began commercial operations in July 2018, brought an initial 43.8 terabits per second of additional capacity to the market.

Ciena said its GeoMesh solution will offer Hawaiki the lowest cost per transported bit, upgrading the cable to a cumulative 67 terabits per second in transmission speeds - a 53 percent increase of Hawaiki’s design capacity achieved just a few months after its commercial launch. The upgrade includes Ciena’s 6500 Submarine Line Terminating Equipment (SLTE) as well as the Waveserver Ai platform, both powered by WaveLogic Ai, Hawaiki can now scale from 1GbE, 10GbE, and 100GbE services over 200G and 250G wavelengths, offering a larger granularity of capacity products to its customers. Furthermore, deploying these platforms will provide greater flexibility to meet current and future bandwidth demand, including faster delivery and dynamic provisioning.
Additionally, Ciena’s  Blue Planet Manage, Control and Plan (MCP) software will improve network visibility and provide real-time software control, as well as the ability to build customized solutions.

Hawaiki is making its mark in the Pacific region by delivering greater connectivity, diverse routes and competitive pricing that are greatly benefitting local businesses and consumers. Ciena’s optical and packet networking platforms will serve as a great complement to Hawaiki’s already extensive submarine network, addressing and adapting to the modern requirements of a bandwidth-hungry environment.” stated Rick Seeto, Vice President and General Manager of Asia Pacific and Japan, Ciena.

Hawaiki transpacific subsea cable enters service

The Hawaiki transpacific subsea cable is now ready for service.

Hawaiki is a 15,000 km fibre optic deep-sea cable linking Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific and United States. The system uses TE SubCom's optical add/drop multiplexing (OADM) nodes allows for additional landings in the Pacific region to be added as needed. Hawaiki will provide 43 Tbps of new capacity in the Pacific region.

The system was built at a cost of US$300 million. Anchor customers on the new cable include Amazon Web Services, Vodafone, American Samoa Telecommunications Authority (ASTCA) and Research and Education Advanced Network New Zealand (REANNZ).

“This 25-year transoceanic infrastructure opens the door for unprecedented levels of economic, social and research collaboration right across the Pacific,” said Hawaiki Chief Executive Officer, Remi Galasso.

“Hawaiki is the fastest and largest cross-sectional capacity link between the U.S. and Australia and New Zealand. It will significantly enhance our connectivity to the rest of the world and, ultimately, improve the everyday life of our communities.”

Monday, August 27, 2018

TE SubCom to provide secondary NOC for Hawaiki transpacific cable

Hawaiki Submarine Cable has selected TE SubCom to provide backup Network Operations Center (B-NOC) services for its transpacific cable systems. The B-NOC will operate from TE SubCom’s Eatontown, NJ, USA headquarters.

SubCom said its NOC solutions are vendor-neutral and offer global, 24x7x365 monitoring coverage with both high-level and regional visibility into network status.

The Hawaiki Cable System is a 15,000km fiber optic cable connecting Sydney, Australia; Mangawhai Heads, New Zealand; Tafuna, American Samoa; Kapolei, Hawaii, USA; and Pacific City, Oregon, USA. Stubbed branching units have been installed to facilitate future connections into New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga.

The Hawaiki system uses TE SubCom's optical add/drop multiplexing (OADM) nodes allows for additional landings in the Pacific region to be added as needed. Hawaiki will provide 43 Tbps of new capacity in the Pacific region. The system was built at a cost of US$300 million. Anchor customers on the new cable include Amazon Web Services, Vodafone, American Samoa Telecommunications Authority (ASTCA) and Research and Education Advanced Network New Zealand (REANNZ).

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Hawaiki transpacific subsea cable enters service

The Hawaiki transpacific subsea cable is now ready for service.

Hawaiki is a 15,000 km fibre optic deep-sea cable linking Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific and United States. The system uses TE SubCom's optical add/drop multiplexing (OADM) nodes allows for additional landings in the Pacific region to be added as needed. Hawaiki will provide 43 Tbps of new capacity in the Pacific region.

The system was built at a cost of US$300 million. Anchor customers on the new cable include Amazon Web Services, Vodafone, American Samoa Telecommunications Authority (ASTCA) and Research and Education Advanced Network New Zealand (REANNZ).

“This 25-year transoceanic infrastructure opens the door for unprecedented levels of economic, social and research collaboration right across the Pacific,” said Hawaiki Chief Executive Officer, Remi Galasso.

“Hawaiki is the fastest and largest cross-sectional capacity link between the U.S. and Australia and New Zealand. It will significantly enhance our connectivity to the rest of the world and, ultimately, improve the everyday life of our communities.”

Sunday, May 6, 2018

Final splice complete on Hawaiki transpacific cable with up to 43 Tbps of capacity

The final splice of the Hawaiki Submarine Cable has been made and the system is on schedule for commercial launch next month

The carrier-neutral Hawaiki subsea cable links Australia and New Zealand to the mainland United States, as well as Hawaii and American Samoa, with additional potential future landings in New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga.

The Hawaiki Cable System comprises over 15,000 km of high-capacity cable, and the use of TE SubCom's optical add/drop multiplexing (OADM) nodes allows for additional landings in the Pacific region to be added as needed.
Hawaiki will provide 43 Tb of new capacity in the Pacific region, significantly dropping the cost of connectivity in this area.

“Hawaiki will positively impact the countless communities and economies in the Pacific,” said Remi Galasso, CEO of Hawaiki. “Because of its scope and impact for communities in the Pacific region, the Hawaiki Cable System is a critical and multi-faceted endeavor. We are pleased with the progress to date and are looking forward to the project’s completion in June and the much-needed capacity it will bring to the region.”

Thursday, May 18, 2017

TE SubCom provides update on progress with Hawaiki cable system

Hawaiki Submarine Cable and TE SubCom, a TE Connectivity company that delivers undersea communications technology, have provided a further update on the project to deploy the 14,000 km Hawaiki trans-Pacific cable system that will link Australia and New Zealand to the mainland U.S. and Hawaii and American Samoa.

The partners have announced manufacturing progress, as well as ongoing advances with the installation permitting process in New Zealand, Australia and the U.S., stating that the Hawaiki cable system remains on schedule for completion by mid-2018.

Specifically, TE SubCom and Hawaiki Submarine Cable announced that:

1.         At SubCom’s Newington, New Hampshire facility, more than 13,000 km of cable for the Hawaiki system has been manufactured, together with more than 150 completed repeaters.

2.         Installation permits for Australia, New Zealand and Oregon are in process, and are progressing as expected in Hawaii.

3.         Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) for the cable landing in Pacific City, Oregon has commenced and is due to be completed over the coming weeks.

4.         In Sydney, the construction of the land duct route is progressing, with more than half of the conduits installed, while HDD operations are scheduled to begin in June.

5.         The first cable load, including 7,000 km of cable, is scheduled to begin in June.

New Zealand's Hawaiki Cable announced in 2013 that it had awarded a turnkey supply and installation contract to TE SubCom to build the 14,000 km trans-Pacific cable linking Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii to the US west coast.


  • The Hawaiki cable system will support capacity of up to 10 Tbit/s per fibre pair on the Australia/New-Zealand to U.S. route, while a number of Pacific Islands along the route will be able to connect to the main trunk.  The wet plant equipment is based on 100 Gbit/s technology and designed to allow for future upgrades. The cable system will also feature SubCom's OADM branching unit technology to allow connection of multiple regional branches to the main cable.


See also