Showing posts with label FCC. Show all posts
Showing posts with label FCC. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

FCC to set rules Z-axis mobile location

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai released his proposal that would help first responders locate people who call 911 from wireless phones in multi-story buildings. 

Specifically, it would establish a vertical (or “z-axis”) location accuracy metric of three meters for 80% of indoor wireless 911 calls.  The FCC will vote on this proposal at its next meeting on November 19, 2019.

“If you call 911 for help, emergency responders need to know where to find you,” said Chairman Pai.  “But that can be a challenge if you make a wireless 911 call from a multi-story building, like many apartments and offices.  Even if first responders know which building you’re in—that is, your horizontal location—they may still need your vertical location to determine which floor you’re on.  Next month, the Commission will address this public safety gap.  If adopted, this new rule would help first responders locate emergency callers more quickly and accurately, which will save lives.  Establishing a z-axis metric of three meters is a major step forward, and I’m grateful for the broad support it’s received from the public safety community, including our nation’s firefighters.”

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

FCC votes 3-2 to approve T-Mobile-Sprint merger

FCC Commissioners voted 3-2 along party lines to approve the T-Mobile-Sprint merger.

In August, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai circulated a draft order with his fellow commissioners urging approval of the T-Mobile + Sprint deal subject to conditions imposed by the Department of Justice.

Voting in opposition to the merger, FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel stated: "We’ve all seen what happens when markets become more concentrated after a merger like this one. In the airline industry, it brought us baggage fees and smaller seats. In the pharmaceutical industry, it led to a handful of drug companies raising the prices of lifesaving medications. There’s no reason to think this time will be different. Overwhelming evidence demonstrates that the T-Mobile-Sprint merger will reduce competition, raise prices, lower quality, and slow innovation."

A coalition of 16 state attorneys general, including California and New York, have filed a lawsuit to block the proposed merger of telecommunications companies T-Mobile and Sprint. The states argue that the merger would lead to higher prices and fewer choices for consumers, particularly low-income subscribers of the companies’ services.

FCC authorizes $61m for rural broadband

The FCC authorized over $61.8 million in funding over the next decade to expand broadband to nearly 22,000 unserved rural homes and businesses in 14 states.

The funding is the sixth wave of support from last year’s successful Connect America Fund Phase II auction.

Broadband providers will begin receiving funding later this month. The FCC listed the following recipients:
State
Company
Minimum Speed
Support Over 10 Years
Locations
California
Frontier California
100/20 Mbps
$51,553
23
Colorado
Inventive Wireless of Nebraska
25/3 Mbps
$1,505,513
336
Iowa
Independent Networks
1 Gbps/500 Mbps
$288,834
123
Iowa
Maquoketa Valley Rural Electric Cooperative
1 Gbps/500 Mbps
$2,262,039
1,107
Kansas
Twin Valley Communications
1 Gbps/500 Mbps
$45,610
9
Louisiana
Allen's T.V. Cable Service
1 Gbps/500 Mbps
$1,776,733
794
Massachusetts
CRC Communications
25/3 Mbps
$921,505
772
Minnesota
Broadband Corp.
100/20 Mbps
$428,117
128
Minnesota
Farmers Mutual Telephone Company
1 Gbps/500 Mbps
$217,993
65
Montana
Gallatin Wireless Internet
25/3 Mbps
$4,012,941
1,256
Nebraska
Inventive Wireless of Nebraska
25/3 Mbps
$678
2
Oklahoma
Oklahoma Fiber
1 Gbps/500 Mbps
$1,715,314
1,460
Tennessee
Sunset Digital Communications
1 Gbps/500 Mbps
$5,595,555
2,095
Virginia
Sunset Digital Communications
1 Gbps/500 Mbps
$23,979,453
6,998
Washington
 LocalTel Communications
25/3 Mbps
$6,847,092
1,910
Wyoming
Inventive Wireless of Nebraska
25/3 Mbps
$3,734,455
1,354
Wyoming
Tri County Telephone Association
1 Gbps/500 Mbps, 25/3 Mbps
$3,004,236
1,930
Wyoming
Union Telephone Company
100/20 Mbps, 25/3 Mbps
$5,437,562
1,468
Total


$61,825,183
21,830


Tuesday, October 1, 2019

U.S. Court of Appeals rules on Net Neutrality

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to uphold the FCC’s 2017 Restoring Internet Freedom order but strike down the FCC’s preemption of state efforts to regulate the Internet.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai released the following statement: “Today’s decision is a victory for consumers, broadband deployment, and the free and open Internet.  The court affirmed the FCC’s decision to repeal 1930s utility-style regulation of the Internet imposed by the prior Administration.  The court also upheld our robust transparency rule so that consumers can be fully informed about their online options."

FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel countered:  “When the FCC rolled back net neutrality it was on the wrong side of the American people and the wrong side of history.  Today’s court decision shows that the agency also got it wrong on the law.  The agency made a mess when it gave broadband providers the power to block websites, throttle services, and censor online content.  Today’s court decision vacates the FCC’s unlawful effort to block states and localities from protecting an open internet for their citizens.  From small towns to big cities, from state houses to governors’ executive actions, states and localities have been stepping in because the FCC shirked its duties.  In addition, the court took the agency to task for disregarding its duty to consider how its decision threatens public safety, Lifeline service, and broadband infrastructure."

FCC Chairman Moves to Reverse Net Neutrality Rules

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai circulated a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking with his fellow commissioners at the FCC aimed at reversing the Title II "Net Neutrality" rules adopted in 2015.

In a published speech, Pai described the Title II rules as a regulatory mistake that slowed down telecom infrastructure spending in the United States by 5.6% percent, or $3.6 billion, between 2014 and 2016 for just the top 12 Internet service providers. He said the rules were not needed in 2015 because the Internet "was not broken" and that these 1930s era regulations were constraining the further rollouts of new infrastructure.

Key elements of Pai's proposal include (1) return the classification of broadband service from a Title II telecommunications service to a Title I information service (2) eliminate the so-called Internet conduct standard (3) seeks comment on how the FCC approach the so-called bright-line rules adopted in 2015.

The FCC will vote on the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking at its meeting in May.

https://www.fcc.gov/document/chairman-pai-speech-future-internet-regulation

Thursday, September 26, 2019

FCC outlines 3.5 GHz auction plan for 2020

The FCC is proposing to auction seven Priority Access Licenses (PALs) in the 3550-3650 MHz portion of the 3.5 GHz Band for each county-based license area in the country, for a total of 22,631 PALs nationwide.  Each PAL will consist of a 10-megahertz unpaired channel assigned by automated frequency coordinators, known as Spectrum Access Systems.  Consistent with the Commission’s rules, Priority Access Licensees would be permitted to aggregate up to four PALs in any license area.

The 3.5 GHz band holds the potential to be prime spectrum for 5G services.

The FCC is now seeking comment on the following proposals:

Using an ascending clock auction format (similar to the format used for Auction 102 and to be used for Auction 103), in which bidders indicate their demand for generic license blocks in specific counties;
Offering bidders the option to bid at a Cellular Market Area (CMA) level in the 172 CMAs that are classified as Metropolitan Statistical Areas and comprise multiple counties; and
Incorporating an “activity upper limit” that would allow bidders to submit bids that exceed their current bidding eligibility, to help mitigate the possibility of losing bidding eligibility under certain circumstances.

The FCC's Public Notice also proposes rules for bidding credit caps, upfront payments, bidding eligibility, minimum opening bids, bid removal and withdrawal, and other auction procedures for Auction 105, which is set to begin on June 25, 2020.



Monday, September 16, 2019

FCC approves CommScope's CBRS Spectrum Access System

CommScope received official notification from the FCC that its spectrum access system (SAS) to support the Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS) is now certified for initial commercial deployment.

With the notification earlier this year from the Institute for Telecommunication Sciences that its Environmental Sensing Capability (ESC) sensor passed testing, and the addition of Ruckus Networks’ Band 48 CBRS devices (or access points) and cloud services, CommScope said it is now poised to deliver on the promise of wireless coverage and capacity for in-building, public spaces and IoT.

“With the public notice from the FCC, companies can finally enter initial commercial deployment and begin to realize the value that private LTE can bring to their buildings, campuses, employees, customers and business,” said Iain Gillott, president and founder of iGR. “CommScope is demonstrating its commitment to bringing CBRS to life with a full solution consisting of CBRS access points, SAS and ESC. The industry needs an end-to-end solution to give organizations the ability to quickly, and confidently, deploy LTE-based wireless solutions.”


  • In 2018, AT&T announced CommScope was selected as the SAS provider for its first 5G-ready CBRS network solution. In addition, CommScope’s SAS is in trials with other major carriers for customers in a variety of industries.



CBRS milestone: Commscope and Google pass test

The Institute for Telecommunication Sciences (ITS) has given a passing grade to a Citizens Broadband Radio Service (CBRS) Environmental Sensing Capability (ESC) system developed by CommScope and Google.

ITS, which is part of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), is the official test lab that has been tasked with confirming the performance of ESCs.

CBRS provides 150 MHz of spectrum in the 3.5 GHz band in the U.S. CBRS spectrum is managed by Spectrum Access Systems (SASs) but will require an ESC network to detect federal radar operations. The ESC will alert the SASs of federal radar activity, and SASs will then reconfigure nearby CBRS devices to operate without interfering with federal operations.

“Our ESC sensor has passed all required testing for certification - demonstrating that we can detect all current and future radar waveforms and our respective SASs can protect incumbent users,” said Mat Varghese, Senior Product Manager, Wireless Services, Google. “This is an important milestone and we are looking ahead toward commercial operations in CBRS.”

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

FCC Chairman urges approval of T-Mobile + Sprint

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai circulated a draft order with his fellow commissioners urging approval of the T-Mobile + Sprint deal subject to conditions imposed by the Department of Justice.

“After one of the most exhaustive merger reviews in Commission history, the evidence conclusively demonstrates that this transaction will bring fast 5G wireless service to many more Americans and help close the digital divide in rural areas. Moreover, with the conditions included in this draft Order, the merger will promote robust competition in mobile broadband, put critical mid-band spectrum to use, and bring new competition to the fixed broadband market.” said Chairman Pai. “I thank our transaction team for the thorough and careful analysis reflected in this draft Order and hope that my colleagues will vote to approve it.”

Sunday, August 11, 2019

FCC Chairman Pai: Current RF exposure limits are good

FCC chairman Ajit Pai is proposing to maintain current RF exposure safety limits, saying the United States’ RF exposure limits for handheld devices are already among the most stringent in the world.

Pai's proposal would also establish a uniform set of guidelines for ensuring compliance with the limits regardless of the service or technology, replacing the Commission’s current inconsistent
patchwork of service-specific rules.

“The FCC sets radiofrequency limits in close consultation with the FDA and other health agencies. After a thorough review of the record and consultation with these agencies, we find
it appropriate to maintain the existing radiofrequency limits, which are among the most stringent in the world for cell phones,” said Julius Knapp, chief of the FCC’s Office of Engineering and Technology. As Jeffrey Shuren, Director of the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, wrote to the FCC, “[t]he available scientific evidence to date does not support adverse health effects in humans due to exposures at or under the current limits…” and “[n]o changes to the current standards are warranted at this time.”

https://www.fcc.gov/rfsafety

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

FCC clarifies rules for 5G auction in upper 37 GHz, 39GHz, and 47 GHz bands

The FCC established procedures for the third auction of high-band, flexible-use licenses suitable for 5G. 

This auction of airwaves in the Upper 37 GHz, 39 GHz, and 47 GHz spectrum bands will be the largest spectrum auction in our nation’s history, offering licenses covering up to 3,400 megahertz. 

Bidding in Auction 103 is scheduled to commence on December 10, 2019.  The Public Notice approved by the FCC today provides details regarding the procedures, terms, conditions, dates, and deadlines governing participation in Auction 103, as well as an overview of the post-auction application and payment processes. 

Auction 103 is designed as an incentive auction that will provide incentive payments to existing 39 GHz licensees that relinquish their spectrum usage rights, increasing the amount of 39 GHz spectrum available for new licenses.  The auction will offer licenses for 100 megahertz blocks of spectrum in Partial Economic Areas (PEA) through a clock phase and an assignment phase.  The clock phase will allow bidding on generic blocks in two categories—one for Upper 37 GHz and 39 GHz, and one for 47 GHz—in each PEA.  The clock phase will serve to determine both the winners of generic spectrum blocks and the amount of incentive payments due to those incumbent licensees in the 39 GHz band that opt to relinquish their spectrum usage rights.  The assignment phase will allow bidding for frequency-specific license assignments, while ensuring contiguous block assignments within a PEA.


FCC issues rules for broadband access in apartments

The FCC adopted the following items with the intent of promoting facilities-based broadband deployment and greater consumer choice for Americans living in apartment buildings:


  • First, in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), the FCC seeks public input on additional actions it could take to accelerate the deployment of next-generation networks and services within MTEs.  In particular, the NPRM seeks comment on the impact that revenue sharing agreements between building owners and broadband providers, exclusivity agreements regarding rooftop facilities, and exclusive wiring arrangements have on broadband competition and deployment
  • Second, in a Declaratory Ruling, the Commission clarifies that it welcomes state and local experimentation to increase access to MTEs—so long as those actions are consistent with federal law and policy.
  • Third, in the same Declaratory Ruling, the Commission preempts part of an outlier San Francisco ordinance to the extent it requires the sharing of in-use wiring in MTEs.  Required sharing of in-use wiring deters broadband deployment, undercuts the Commission’s rules regarding control of cable wiring in residential MTEs, and threatens the Commission’s framework to protect the technical integrity of cable systems for the benefit of viewers. 

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai issued the following comment with regard to the San Francisco ordinance: "Unsurprisingly, some oppose our decision to preempt today.  I would say that they are making a mountain out of a molehill, but in reality, there isn’t even a molehill here.  Throughout this proceeding, the City of San Francisco has failed to mount any defense whatsoever of requiring the sharing of in-use wiring.  Yet before I circulated this draft Declaratory Ruling to my colleagues three weeks ago, the city also refused to say that its ordinance didn’t mandate the sharing of in-use wiring.  Indeed, it was only last week that the city finally stopped playing games with this Schrödinger’s cat of an ordinance and belatedly claimed that its ordinance “does not require sharing of ‘in-use’ wiring.”

https://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-spurs-broadband-access-apartments-condos-office-buildings

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

FCC to overhaul 2.5 GHz band (2496-2690 MHz) for 5G

The FCC unveiled its proposal to make available for 5G lots of mid-band spectrum that is current fallow.

Specifically, the new rules would transform the regulatory framework governing the 2.5 GHz band (2496-2690 MHz), the single largest band of contiguous spectrum below 3 gigahertz.

This spectrum was set aside more than 20 years ago for future Educational Broadcast Services (EBS).

Some highlights of the FCC's Report and Order:
  • Establish a priority filing window for rural Tribal Nations to provide them with an opportunity to
  • obtain unassigned 2.5 GHz spectrum to address the needs of their communities.
  • Make any remaining unassigned 2.5 GHz spectrum available for commercial use via competitive
  • bidding immediately following the completion of the Tribal priority filing window.
  • Adopt counties as the appropriate geographic area size for new overlay licenses and a band plan
  • with two sizes of licenses: a 100 megahertz block and a 16.5 megahertz block.
  • Adopt construction deadlines so that new licensees build out this midband spectrum.
  • Eliminate outdated rules preventing this spectrum from being put to its highest and best use,
  • including restrictions on who may be a licensee, restrictions on how licensees must use the
  • spectrum, and restrictions on how licensees may lease spectrum to other entities.
  • • Leave unaffected the terms of any private contractual arrangement or any provisions in existing
  • leases that provide a licensee with airtime, equipment, or capacity—incumbent licensees are
  • simply given more flexibility to put existing licenses to their best use

At its upcoming open meeting in July, the FCC will also consider application and bidding procedures for Auction 103, the incentive auction of Upper Microwave Flexible Use Service licenses in the Upper 37 GHz, 39 GHz, and 47 GHz bands.

https://www.fcc.gov/document/transforming-25-ghz-band-5g

Monday, June 10, 2019

FCC authorizes $166.8 million for rural broadband

The FCC authorized $166.8 million in funding over the next decade to expand broadband to 60,850 unserved rural homes and businesses in 22 states. This represents the second wave of support from last year’s successful Connect America Fund Phase II auction.  Providers will begin receiving funding this month.

In total, the auction last fall allocated $1.488 billion in support to expand broadband to more than 700,000 unserved rural homes and small businesses over the next 10 years.  The FCC authorized the first wave of funding in May, providing $111.6 million in funding over the next decade to expand service to 37,148 unserved homes and businesses in 12 states.

To date, the first two rounds of authorizations are providing $278.4 million over the next decade to expand service to 97,998 new locations.  Over the coming months, the FCC will be authorizing additional funding as it approves the final applications of the winning bidders from the auction.

“I’m pleased to announce that the second round of funding starts now for buildout of high-speed Internet service to 60,850 rural homes and businesses, which will bring them to the right side of the digital divide and give them access to the 21st-century opportunities that broadband offers,” said FCC Chairman Ajit Pai.  “Providers will be deploying gigabit-speed connections to the majority of locations for which funding is being authorized today, while nearly 8,000 homes and small businesses on Tribal lands will be getting fixed broadband service for the first time.”

The funding applications approved by the Commission today include the following:

  • Central Virginia Services, an electric coop, is receiving $28.6 million to deploy gigabit connections to nearly 11,000 locations in rural Virginia
  • NTUA Wireless is receiving $28.4 million to serve over 7,000 homes and small businesses in Tribal areas of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah, while SW DinehNet will serve 869 Tribal locations in New Mexico
  • Co-Mo Comm, an electric coop, is receiving nearly $22 million to deploy gigabit connections to over 8,350 rural locations in Missouri
  • Commnet of Nevada is receiving $23.6 million to provide service to over 12,800 homes and businesses in 11 counties in rural Nevada

A full list of recipients is online.

https://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-authorizes-1668-million-expand-rural-broadband-22-states

Tuesday, June 4, 2019

FCC: List of winning bidders for 28 GHz licenses

The FCC announced the following winning bidders for its auction of 28 GHz upper microwave flexible use service licenses (Auction 101):


https://www.fcc.gov/document/auction-101-results-public-notice


Tuesday, May 28, 2019

FCC auctions 24 GHz and 28 GHz spectrum for $2.7 billion

The FCC announced the close of bidding in Auction 102 for millimeter wave spectrum in the 24 GHz band suitable for 5G.

Auction 101 for 28 GHz band licenses was completed in January.

The FCC said the auction raised more than $2.7 billion in gross bids.  Combined, 55 applicants were qualified to bid, and the winning bidders won 5,869 licenses.

The FCC will release a public notice in a few days providing detailed auction results and notifying Auction 102 winning bidders of deadlines for payments and the filing of long-form applications, as well as other post-auction procedures needed for the prompt issuance of licenses. 

“American leadership in 5G means deploying more airwaves for the next generation of wireless connectivity,” said FCC Chairman Ajit Pai.  “The successful conclusion of our nation’s first two high-band flexible, mobile-use spectrum auctions is a critical step.  By making more spectrum available, we’ll ensure that American consumers reap the substantial benefits that 5G innovation will bring and we’ll extend U.S. leadership in 5G.”

  • On December 10, the FCC will begin Auction 103, which includes the upper 37 GHz, 39 GHz, and 47 GHz bands.  This will be the largest spectrum auction in U.S. history, with 3400 megahertz up for bid.

Monday, May 20, 2019

Ajit Pai voices support for T-Mobile+Sprint merger

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai is voicing support for the pending T-Mobile + Sprint merger:

“Two of the FCC’s top priorities are closing the digital divide in rural America and advancing United States leadership in 5G, the next generation of wireless connectivity.  The commitments made today by T-Mobile and Sprint would substantially advance each of these critical objectives.

“For example, the companies have committed to deploying a 5G network that would cover 97% of our nation’s population within three years of the closing of the merger and 99% of Americans within six years.  This 5G network would also reach deep into rural areas, with 85% of rural Americans covered within three years and 90% covered within six years.  Additionally, T-Mobile and Sprint have guaranteed that 90% of Americans would have access to mobile broadband service at speeds of at least 100 Mbps and 99% would have access to speeds of at least 50 Mbps.

Pai's statement also mentioned a commitment from the companies not to raise prices for three years, to divest Boost Mobile, and to build out their mid-band spectrum holdings.

FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr also issued a statement in support of the merger.

Sunday, May 12, 2019

SpaceX to launch its first 60 satellites this week

SpaceX expects to launch the first 60 satellites for its Starlink LEO constellation this week.

In a tweet, Elon Musk disclosed that six launches of 60 satellites each are needed for "minor coverage" and 12 launches of 60 satellites each are needed for "moderate" coverage. The accompanying photo reveals an extremely tight packing of photos into the Falcon fairing.

SpaceX has disclosed plans to deploy as many as 12,000 satellites in three, low earth orbit (LEO) shells. Cost estimates for full deployment approach $10 billion.

In November 2018, the FCC granted authority to SpaceX to construct, deploy, and operate a new very-low-Earth orbit constellation of more than 7,000 satellites using V-band frequencies. This is in addition to the authorization granted in March 2018. The FCC also granted SpaceX’s request to add the 37.5-42.0 GHz, and 47.2-50.2 GHz frequency bands to its previously authorized NGSO constellation. SpaceX now has the flexibility to provide both diverse geographic coverage and the capacity to support a wide range of broadband and communications services for residential, commercial, institutional, governmental, and professional users in the United States and globally.

FCC approves SpaceX's NGSO Satellite System

The FCC voted authorized SpaceX to construct, deploy, and operate a proposed non-geostationary orbit (NGSO) satellite system comprising 4,425 satellites for the provision of fixed-satellite service (FSS) around the world.

In July 2016, OneWeb was granted approval to build a similar constellation of MEO satellites.

Two months ago, SpaceX successfully launched the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) PAZ observation satellite on behalf of Hisdesat and two satellites of its own.  Tintin A & B are the first two demonstration satellites for SpaceX's planned Starlink broadband satellite service. Both were successfully deployed into polar orbit and are communicating with Earth stations.

In regulatory filing, SpaceX has revealed that its initial system will consist of 4,425 satellites operating in 83 orbital planes (at altitudes ranging from 1,110 km to 1,325 km).  The system will require associated ground control facilities, gateway earth stations, and end-user earth stations. The system will use Ka- and Ku-Band spectrum.  SpaceX has separately filed for authority to operate in the V-Band, where the company has proposed an additional constellation of 7,500 satellites operating even closer to Earth. To implement the system, SpaceX will utilise the availability of significantly more powerful computing and software capabilities.  On the launch broadcast for the PAZ satellite, SpaceX said quite a bit of development work remains ahead on its satellite constellation plans

Thursday, May 9, 2019

FCC considers opening 1675-1680 MHz band for shared use

The FCC is proposing to reallocate spectrum in the 1675-1680 MHz band for shared use between incumbent federal users and new, non-federal flexible-use wireless operations.

The 1675-1680 MHz band currently is used for weather forecasting services. The FCC proposes to reallocate the 1675-1680 MHz band on a co-primary basis for terrestrial fixed and mobile (except aeronautical mobile) use on a shared basis with existing federal users, and it seeks comment on appropriate service and technical rules for the band.

FCC rejects China Mobile's license application

After a very lengthy review period, the FCC voted to deny an application from China Mobile to provide telecommunication services between the United States and foreign destinations.

The FCC said it thoroughly examined the application and found it to be not in the public interest due to several factors related to China Mobile USA’s ownership and control by the Chinese government. The FCC further stated that a grant of the application would raise substantial and serious national security and law enforcement risks that cannot be addressed through a mitigation agreement between China Mobile and the federal government.

Ajit Pai, FCC Chairman, stated: "Simply put, granting China Mobile’s application would not be in the public interest. China Mobile ultimately is owned and controlled by the Chinese government. That makes it vulnerable to exploitation, influence, and control by that government. And in the current security environment, which features Chinese government involvement in computer intrusions and economic espionage, there is a significant risk that the Chinese government would use China Mobile to conduct activities that would seriously jeopardize the national security, law enforcement, and economic interests of the United States."

https://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-denies-china-mobile-telecom-services-application


  • China Mobile's application was filed in 2011.

FCC approves Theia's 112 Satellite LEO Constellation

The FCC approved an application by Theia Holdings to construct, launch, and operate a satellite constellation that will be used to provide high-resolution earth-imaging data in the United States and globally.

Theia’s proposed satellite system is comprised of 112 satellites operating in non-geostationary satellite orbit, and the Commission granted Theia authority for those satellites to use frequencies in the Ka (20/30 GHz), Ku (11/14 GHz), V (40/50 GHz) and the 1215-1300 MHz bands to provide fixed-satellite and earth exploration satellite services.

Over the past eighteen months, the FCC has approved requests by OneWeb, SpaceX, and other companies proposing NGSO constellations.

Various media reports have stated that the Theia Satellite Network will be used for high-definition Earth observation. 

Thursday, May 2, 2019

FCC offers incentives to rural carriers for faster broadband

The FCC’s Wireline Competition Bureau extended offers of broadband subsidies to 516 rural “rate-of-return” companies in 46 states through a predictable cost model, rather than the current legacy system, which dates to the era of voice-only service. The action could result in over 1 million rural homes getting faster broadband service.

The FCC voted to make this offer in December.

To get the subsidies, the rural carriers would be required to deploy broadband on a defined schedule over the next decade at speeds of at least 25 Mbps download/3 Mbps upload to homes and businesses fully funded by the model.  If all carriers opt in to the offer, they will be required to deploy 25/3 Mbps broadband to at least 1,126,082 homes and businesses. 

The FCC also noted that its action will increase the obligation to deploy high-speed broadband even for those carriers that do not accept the offer of model-based support.  Under prior rules, legacy carriers were only required to deploy 10/1 Mbps broadband to 115,441 locations; they were not required to deploy 25/3 Mbps broadband to any locations.  As a result of the Commission’s December vote, the Bureau has increased those obligations so that legacy carriers will be required to deploy 25/3 Mbps broadband to at least 600,535 locations.

Rate-of-return carriers receive approximately $2.4 billion each year of the FCC’s $4.794 billion in universal service support for rural broadband, and of that, the 262 companies that have already elected A-CAM support get approximately $607 million per year.  Carriers currently receiving legacy support have 45 days to opt in to today’s A-CAM offer.

https://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-incentivizes-faster-broadband-over-1-million-rural-locations

See also