Showing posts with label FCC. Show all posts
Showing posts with label FCC. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

U.S. Senate votes to rescind FCC order ending Net Neutrality

The FCC voted 52-to-47  in favor of a bill that reverses the FCC's recent order ending Net Neutrality.

The bill now goes to the U.S. House of Representatives for consideration.


FCC votes 3-2 to end Net Neutrality rules

The FCC voted 3-2 along partisan lines to adopt the "Restoring Internet Freedom Order" proposed by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai to rollback Obama-era Net Neutrality rules. Voting in favor of the order were Republicans Ajit Pai, who argued that measure will usher in a new era of investment for Internet infrastructure. Also voting in favor were Republicans Michael O'Rielly and Brendan Carr. Voting against the measure were Democrats Mignon Clyburn and Jessica Rosenworcel.

FCC Chairman said that by returning to the classification of Internet services as an “information service”— removing the current Title II regulatory regime that gives the FCC say over the delivery of Internet content — the new order returns the industry to the status quo prior to 2015.

The vote proceeded despite an urgent request from the Attorney Generals of 18 states urging a delay to the vote due to a criminal investigation into possible fraudulent manipulation of the FCC's public comment process for this issue.  In a public letterto FCC Commissioners, the Attorney Generals said their ongoing review of the public comments process has revealed a large number of fake comment submissions using the names and identities of real people. The initial assessment is that there were over 1 million fake comments indicating a deliberate effort to skew the public comment process on an issue of national importance. The Attorney Generals are also requesting the help of the FCC in their investigation of "massive identity theft."

President Trump Picks Pai for FCC Chairman



President Donald J. Trump designated Ajit Pai as his choice to be Chair of the FCC. Ajit Varadaraj Pai was nominated for FCC Commissioner by President Obama in 2011. Pai took over the seat abandoned by Meredith Baker who left the FCC to take a job as a lobbyist for Comcast. Pai was previously a Partner in the Litigation Department of Jenner & Block LLP. Previously, Pai worked in the Office of the General Counsel at the Federal Communications...







FCC Votes 3-2 to Adopt Open Internet Rules

The Federal Communications Commission voted 3-2 to adopt a new set of Open Internet rules proposed by Commissioner Wheeler and backed by the Obama Administration. All of the new rules, which are based on the FCC's authority under Title II of the Communications Act of 1934, would apply to fixed and mobile broadband alike, while leaving room for reasonable network management and its specific application to mobile and unlicensed WiFi networks.

Here are the key provisions and rules of the Open Internet Order as outlined by the FCC:

Bright Line Rules:  The first three rules ban practices that are known to harm the Open Internet.

  • No Blocking: broadband providers may not block access to legal content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices.
  • No Throttling: broadband providers may not impair or degrade lawful Internet traffic on the basis of content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices.
  • No Paid Prioritization: broadband providers may not favor some lawful Internet traffic over other lawful traffic in exchange for consideration of any kind—in other words, no “fast lanes.”   This rule also bans ISPs from prioritizing content and services of their affiliates. It also prohibits practices that target specific applications or classes of applications.  

Thursday, May 3, 2018

FCC requests 2019 budget of $333 million

The FCC is requesting a FY 2019 budget of $333,118,000, derived from regulatory fees for regular FCC operations, and an auction spending cap of $112,734,000. 

For comparison, the FCC received an appropriation of $322,035,000 for FY 2018, which was down approximately five percent from the FY 2017 appropriation.

The FCC noted that some of the additional funding will be used for upcoming spectrum auctions, including the nearly $2 billion Connect America Fund Phase II reverse auction this year to expand fixed broadband service to unserved regions The FCC is targeting 2019 for the $4.5 billion Mobility Fund Phase II reverse auction.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Mignon L. Clyburn to leave the FCC

Mignon L. Clyburn announced her intention to step down as FCC commissioner.

Clyburn has served on the FCC since July 2009 and has become known for her advocacy of Net Neutrality, efforts to close the digital divide, and reform of predatory telecom practices that take advantage of the poor and of prison inmates.  She previously was a member of South Carolina's Public Service Commission.

In 2013, Clyburn took on the role of acting chair of the FCC until Tom Wheeler was confirmed by the Senate for the role. She was the first woman to hold the chair at the FCC.

Friday, March 30, 2018

FCC issues its order to speed rollout of 5G small cells

The Federal Communications Commission issued its expected order streamlining the wireless infrastructure siting review process to facilitate the deployment of 5G small cells. The order addresses the differences between large and small wireless facilities, and clarifies the treatment of small cell deployments. Specifically, the Order:

  • Excludes small wireless facilities deployed on non-Tribal lands from National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review,
  • concluding that these facilities are not “undertakings” or “major federal actions.” Small wireless facilities deployments continue to be subject to currently applicable
  • state and local government approval requirements.
  • Clarifies and makes improvements to the process for Tribal participation in Section 106 historic preservation reviews for large wireless facilities where NHPA/NEPA
  • review is still required.
  • Removes the requirement that applicants file Environmental Assessments solely due to the location of a proposed facility in a floodplain, as long as certain conditions are met.
  • Establishes timeframes for the Commission to act on Environmental Assessments.

Ajit Pai, FCC Chair, stated: "We take a giant leap forward in updating our wireless infrastructure rules.  By cutting unnecessary red tape, weíll make it substantially easier for carriers to build next-generation wireless networks throughout the United States.  That means faster and more reliable wireless services for American consumers and businesses.  That means more wireless innovation, such as novel applications based on the Internet of Things.  And ultimately, that means American leadership in 5G.  Specifically, we clarify today that small cells are inherently different from large towers.  So they shouldnít face identical regulatory review under the National Historic Preservation Act and National Environmental Policy Act.  We also streamline the process for Tribal review notifications through our Tower Construction Notification System."

In dissent, Jessica Rsosenworcel, writes: "It is not a sure thing that the United States will lead the world in 5G wireless.  In fact, the available evidence is that weíre falling behind.  If we want to lead in 5G, we unconditionally need a spectrum auction this year.  South Korea, Germany, Australia, the United Kingdom, and Romania are now leading the way with definitive plans for wireless auctions in 2018.  We do not do that here.  If we want to lead in 5G, we need policies to encourage deep fiber investments.  Our wireless facilities will need to be connected to millions of miles of fiber, requiring creative thinking about everything from permitting to securing access to rights of way.  We do not do that here.  If we want to lead in 5G, we need serious policies to address our equipment supply chain challenges.  That means developing a real plan rather than relying on opaque decisions issued from behind the closed doors of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States.  We do not do that here.   If we want to lead in 5G, we need to modernize our approach to wireless infrastructure.  We need to streamline the process for the deployment of small cells because over the next eight years we will require as many as 800,000 of them.  Thatís daunting.  At the same time, we need to modernize our approach to larger wireless facilitiesóand thatís daunting, too.  A solution to this infrastructure challenge is long overdueóand while todayís decision purports to be oneóit misses the mark."

FCC approves SpaceX's NGSO Satellite System

The FCC voted authorized SpaceX to construct, deploy, and operate a proposed non-geostationary orbit (NGSO) satellite system comprising 4,425 satellites for the provision of fixed-satellite service (FSS) around the world. 

In July 2016, OneWeb was granted approval to build a similar constellation of MEO satellites.

Two months ago, SpaceX successfully launched the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) PAZ observation satellite on behalf of Hisdesat and two satellites of its own.  Tintin A & B are the first two demonstration satellites for SpaceX's planned Starlink broadband satellite service. Both were successfully deployed into polar orbit and are communicating with Earth stations.

In regulatory filing, SpaceX has revealed that its initial system will consist of 4,425 satellites operating in 83 orbital planes (at altitudes ranging from 1,110 km to 1,325 km).  The system will require associated ground control facilities, gateway earth stations, and end-user earth stations. The system will use Ka- and Ku-Band spectrum.  SpaceX has separately filed for authority to operate in the V-Band, where the company has proposed an additional constellation of 7,500 satellites operating even closer to Earth. To implement the system, SpaceX will utilise the availability of significantly more powerful computing and software capabilities.  On the launch broadcast for the PAZ satellite, SpaceX said quite a bit of development work remains ahead on its satellite constellation plans.

Monday, February 19, 2018

Intelsat and SES agree on joint use of C-band by satellite and mobile operators

Intelsat and SES last week both agreed to back a proposal to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) the seeks to protect satellite services in the 3700-4200 MHz C-band downlink spectrum while opening a specified portion of that spectrum for terrestrial mobile use.

The companies said their joint proposal sets a commercial and technical framework that would enable wireless operators to quickly access approximately 100 MHz of nationwide C-band downlink spectrum in the United States, speeding the deployment of next-generation 5G services. The idea builds on an innovative model first put forward to the FCC by Intelsat and Intel in October 2017 for spectrum sharing.

Under the proposal, a consortium of satellite operators would be created to oversee the governance of the initiative, define and implement the methodology for spectrum clearance, and serve as the sole interface for market-based transactions with parties interested in deploying terrestrial mobile services in specific portions of the C-band.

“The C-band is and remains a critical component of the U.S. network architecture. Space and ground segment operators have invested billions of dollars in U.S. C-band networks and connectivity and generate important value out of it. It is, therefore, our duty and mission to protect the C-band in the U.S. from any form of disruption and preserve its use,” stated Karim Michel Sabbagh, President and CEO of SES.

"Our proposed market-based solution provides a speedy resolution to the U.S. objective of accelerating deployment of 5G services. With Intelsat and SES now in agreement on major tenets of the framework and with the support of Intel, we are confident in our ability to implement this proposal quickly and efficiently, ultimately to the benefit of American consumers and the U.S. economy,” said Intelsat CEO Stephen Spengler.

Monday, January 29, 2018

Proposal to nationalize 5G draws immediate criticism from FCC, CTIA

National Security Council officials in the Trump administration are considering a federal role in building and operating a national 5G network, according to a report by Axios based on a leaked Powerpoint and memo. The idea is to develop a secure, nationwide 5G network at the federal level to stave off security concerns from China. The nationalized infrastructure would then be leased to mobile operators.

The report has drawn immediate criticism across the board.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai: "“I oppose any proposal for the federal government to build and operate a nationwide 5G network.  The main lesson to draw from the wireless sector’s development over the past three decades—including American leadership in 4G—is that the market, not government, is best positioned to drive innovation and investment.  What government can and should do is to push spectrum into the commercial marketplace and set rules that encourage the private sector to develop and deploy next-generation infrastructure."

CTIA President and CEO Meredith Attwell Baker: “The wireless industry agrees that winning the race to 5G is a national priority. The government should pursue the free market policies that enabled the U.S. wireless industry to win the race to 4G.”

Thursday, December 14, 2017

FCC votes 3-2 to end Net Neutrality rules

The FCC voted 3-2 along partisan lines to adopt the "Restoring Internet Freedom Order" proposed by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai to rollback Obama-era Net Neutrality rules. Voting in favor of the order were Republicans Ajit Pai, who argued that measure will usher in a new era of investment for Internet infrastructure. Also voting in favor were Republicans Michael O'Rielly and Brendan Carr. Voting against the measure were Democrats Mignon Clyburn and Jessica Rosenworcel.

FCC Chairman said that by returning to the classification of Internet services as an “information service”— removing the current Title II regulatory regime that gives the FCC say over the delivery of Internet content — the new order returns the industry to the status quo prior to 2015.

The vote proceeded despite an urgent request from the Attorney Generals of 18 states urging a delay to the vote due to a criminal investigation into possible fraudulent manipulation of the FCC's public comment process for this issue.  In a public letter to FCC Commissioners, the Attorney Generals said their ongoing review of the public comments process has revealed a large number of fake comment submissions using the names and identities of real people. The initial assessment is that there were over 1 million fake comments indicating a deliberate effort to skew the public comment process on an issue of national importance. The Attorney Generals are also requesting the help of the FCC in their investigation of "massive identity theft."

President Trump Picks Pai for FCC Chairman



President Donald J. Trump designated Ajit Pai as his choice to be Chair of the FCC. Ajit Varadaraj Pai was nominated for FCC Commissioner by President Obama in 2011. Pai took over the seat abandoned by Meredith Baker who left the FCC to take a job as a lobbyist for Comcast. Pai was previously a Partner in the Litigation Department of Jenner & Block LLP. Previously, Pai worked in the Office of the General Counsel at the Federal Communications...







FCC Votes 3-2 to Adopt Open Internet Rules

The Federal Communications Commission voted 3-2 to adopt a new set of Open Internet rules proposed by Commissioner Wheeler and backed by the Obama Administration. All of the new rules, which are based on the FCC's authority under Title II of the Communications Act of 1934, would apply to fixed and mobile broadband alike, while leaving room for reasonable network management and its specific application to mobile and unlicensed WiFi networks.

Here are the key provisions and rules of the Open Internet Order as outlined by the FCC:

Bright Line Rules:  The first three rules ban practices that are known to harm the Open Internet.

  • No Blocking: broadband providers may not block access to legal content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices.
  • No Throttling: broadband providers may not impair or degrade lawful Internet traffic on the basis of content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices.
  • No Paid Prioritization: broadband providers may not favor some lawful Internet traffic over other lawful traffic in exchange for consideration of any kind—in other words, no “fast lanes.”   This rule also bans ISPs from prioritizing content and services of their affiliates. It also prohibits practices that target specific applications or classes of applications.  

The FCC's  Wireless Telecommunications Bureau has ended its investi

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

FCC Chairman sets Net Neutrality rollback vote for December 14

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai will bring his proposal to rollback Obama-era Net Neutrality rules to a vote at the commission's December 14th meeting.

Pai is calling his proposal the "Restoring Internet Freedom Order," which he believes will usher in a new era of investment for Internet infrastructure.

“For almost twenty years, the Internet thrived under the light-touch regulatory approach established by President Clinton and a Republican Congress. This bipartisan framework led the private sector to invest $1.5 trillion building communications networks throughout the United States. And it gave us an Internet economy that became the envy of the world. But in 2015, the prior FCC bowed to pressure from President Obama. On a party-line vote, it imposed heavy-handed, utility-style regulations upon the Internet. That decision was a mistake," stated Pai.

FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel issued the following response: “Today the FCC circulated its sweeping roll back of our net neutrality rules. Following actions earlier this year to erase consumer privacy protections, the Commission now wants to wipe out court-tested rules and a decade’s work in order to favor cable and telephone companies. This is ridiculous and offensive to the millions of Americans who use the Internet every day. Our Internet economy is the envy of the world because it is open to all. This proposal tears at the foundation of that openness."

FCC Votes 3-2 to Adopt Open Internet Rules

The Federal Communications Commission voted 3-2 to adopt a new set of Open Internet rules proposed by Commissioner Wheeler and backed by the Obama Administration. All of the new rules, which are based on the FCC's authority under Title II of the Communications Act of 1934, would apply to fixed and mobile broadband alike, while leaving room for reasonable network management and its specific application to mobile and unlicensed WiFi networks.

Here are the key provisions and rules of the Open Internet Order as outlined by the FCC:

Bright Line Rules:  The first three rules ban practices that are known to harm the Open Internet.

  • No Blocking: broadband providers may not block access to legal content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices.
  • No Throttling: broadband providers may not impair or degrade lawful Internet traffic on the basis of content, applications, services, or non-harmful devices.
  • No Paid Prioritization: broadband providers may not favor some lawful Internet traffic over other lawful traffic in exchange for consideration of any kind—in other words, no “fast lanes.”   This rule also bans ISPs from prioritizing content and services of their affiliates. It also prohibits practices that target specific applications or classes of applications.  
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Monday, October 30, 2017

FCC approves CenturyLink + Level 3 merger

After a year-long review, the FCC voted to approve the CenturyLink + Level Communications merger. The FCC ruled that the public interest would not be harmed by the transfer of necessary licenses to secure the merger and that any potential harms to competition are mitigated by the conditions set forth in the DOJ consent decree.

  • On October 3rd, 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice cleared CenturyLink's pending acquisition of Level 3 Communications with certain conditions, including the divestiture of certain Level 3 metro network assets and certain dark fiber assets.

    Specifically, the combined company is required to divest Level 3 metro network assets in Albuquerque, N.M.; Boise, Idaho; and Tucson, Arizona. In addition, the combined company is required to divest 24 strands of dark fiber connecting 30 specified city-pairs across the country in the form of an Indefeasible Right of Use (IRU). CenturyLink said that because these fibers are not currently in commercial use, this divestiture will not affect any current customers or services.


CenturyLink to Acquire Level 3 for $34 Billion

CenturyLink agreed to acquire Level 3 Communications in a cash and stock transaction valued at approximately $34 billion, including the assumption of debt.

The deal combines CenturyLink's larger enterprise customer base with Level 3's global network footprint. The companies said this scale will enable further investment in the reach and speeds of its broadband infrastructure for small businesses and consumers. After close, CenturyLink's Glen Post will continue to serve as Chief Executive Officer and President of the combined company.  Sunit Patel, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Level 3, will serve as Chief Financial Officer of the combined company. The combined company will be headquartered in Monroe, Louisiana and will maintain a significant presence in Colorado and the Denver metropolitan area.

Under terms of the agreement, Level 3 shareholders will receive $26.50 per share in cash and a fixed exchange ratio of 1.4286 shares of CenturyLink stock for each Level 3 share they own, which implies a purchase price of $66.50 per Level 3 share (based on a CenturyLink $28.00 per share reference price) and a premium of approximately 42 percent based on Level 3's unaffected closing share price of $46.92 on October 26, 2016. Upon the closing  CenturyLink shareholders will own approximately 51 percent and Level 3 shareholders will own approximately 49 percent of the combined company.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

One Month later, 70% of cell sites still down in Puerto Rico

One month after Hurricane Maria, 70% of cell sites in Puerto Rico remain out of service. By the FCC count, 1,901 cell sites are offline out of a total 2,723 cell sites before the disaster struck.

Thanks to a roaming pact between the five carriers, approximately 61% (slightly up from 60% last week) of the population was reported to be covered by the wireless carriers in Puerto Rico.

Coverage has also improved somewhat with Satellite Cells on Light Trucks (COLTs) now stationed in ten locations. Terrestrial Cells on Wheels (COWs)/COLTs are also now in four locations.

In the U.S. Virgin Islands, 52% of cell sites remain non-functional. Approximately 88% (up from 79% last week) of the population was reported to be covered by the wireless carriers in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

For its part, on October 14th, AT&T reported that it was processing more than 12 million calls and 6 million texts a day in Puerto Rico. AT&T has portable cell sites in Yabucoa, Rio Grande, Quebradillas, Arecibo, Manati, Yauco, Cayey, Isabela, Mayaguez Mesa, San German, Fajardo, Guayama, Vega Baja, Luquillio, and Coama Sur. AT&T is using portable satellite units at the base of clusters of cell towers in Utuado, Luquillio, and Rincon Pueblo. AT&T said it is working to repair hundreds of miles of damaged fiber and to restore power or bring generators to other sites. The company also cited a new wireless roaming agreement with a company called Vanu that currently has three satellite-based cell sites up and running in Puerto Rico and 30 more arrived October 11.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

FCC offers $76.9m advance to networks in Puerto Rico

The FCC will make available $76.9 million in emergency funding to help restore communications networks in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The action comes 2 weeks after Hurricane Maria devastated the islands, knocking out nearly all communications. As of October 04, 2017, 86.3% of cell sites remain out of service. In the U.S. Virgin Islands, 66.0% of cell sites are out of service, and 100% of cell sites in St. John are still out of service.

The FCC emergency funding actually draws upon funds designated for high-cost universal service support. Telecommunications carriers (ETCs) operating in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands who are already eligible for these funds may now choose a single advance payment of up to seven months of high-cost support to assist with their immediate needs and
anticipated large repair costs in restoring their communications networks.

Monday, October 2, 2017

Telecom disaster continues in Puerto Rico: 88% of cell sites still down

Nearly ten days after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico,  88.3% of cell sites across the island remain out of service, according to the FCC. The figure is basically unchanged in the past few days.

In the U.S. Virgin Islands, 68.9%  of cell sites remain down. All of the cell sites in St. John are still out of service.

The FCC continues to post a daily outage report but has not yet convened a public hearing into the disaster, nor has it speculated as to when the public should expect services to be restored. Claro (America Movil), AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint are the major cellular operators serving Puerto Rico.

Sandra Torres, the president of Puerto Rico's telecom regulatory authority (Junta Reglamentadora de Telecomunicaciones JRT) told local media on Sunday that the goal is to restore 50% of cell sites within 30 days. She said AT&T has installed a few COW (Cell on Wheels) units around the island, but no number was given. The JRT website remains offline.

PREPA Networks, the dominant fiber network operator across Puerto Rico and a business unit of the island's hard-hit electrical utility company, has not provided any public statements about the damage to its network since before the hurricane.

Ajit Pai confirmed for new term as FCC Chairman

The U.S. Senate voted to confirm Ajit Pai for a second term as chairman of the FCC. Ajit Varadaraj Pai was nominated for FCC Commissioner by President Obama in 2011. Pai took over the seat abandoned by Meredith Baker who left the FCC to take a job as a lobbyist for Comcast. Pai was previously a Partner in the Litigation Department of Jenner & Block LLP. Previously, Pai worked in the Office of the General Counsel at the Federal Communications Commission, where he served as Deputy General Counsel, Associate General Counsel, and Special Advisor to the General Counsel. He holds a B.A. from Harvard University and a J.D. from the University of Chicago.

Separately, Dr. Eric Burger was appointed Chief Technology Officer of the FCC. Prior to joining the Commission, Dr. Burger served as director of the Security and Software Engineering Research Center in Washington, DC. Previously, he has taught computer science at Georgetown University, George Mason University, and The George Washington University. He holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Illinois Institute of Technology, an MBA from Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Belgium, and bachelor’s degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

FCC waives spectrum restriction in Puerto Rico to aid first responders

The FCC waived rules to facilitate use of two nationwide interoperability channels (151.1375 MHz and 154.4525 MHz) in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico) and the United States Virgin Islands (USVI). 

The waiver authorizes the use of the designated frequencies in Puerto Rico and the USVI for public safety. 

Friday, September 22, 2017

FCC: 95% of cell sites in Puerto Rico still offline

Almost two days after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, over 95% of cell sites remain offline, according to data from the FCC.

As of September 22, 2017 at 11:00 AM EDT, FCC data showed that 95% of cell sites in Puerto Rico are out of service. Critically, 47 out of the 78 counties in Puerto Rico have 100% of their cell sites out of service even nearly 24 hours after the storm passed. The FCC database shows that there are 1,789 base stations in Puerto Rico and 1,707 are down. Four additional cell sites lost connectivity in the past 24 hours.

In the U.S. Virgin Islands, 73% of cell sites are out of service - a 4% improvement in the last 24 hours.

With the widespread power outages in Puerto Rico it is assumed that cable Internet services are also offline for most customers, but the FCC had not received any data on the status of the networks.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

FCC: 95% of Cell Sites down in Puerto Rico

Hurricane Maria delivered a devastating blow to the mobile networks in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

As of September 21, 2017 at 11:00 AM EDT, FCC data showed that 95% of cell sites in Puerto Rico are out of service. Critically, 48 out of the 78 counties in Puerto Rico have 100% of their cell sites out of service even nearly 24 hours after the storm passed. The FCC database shows that there are 1,789 base stations in Puerto Rico and 1,703 are down.

In the U.S. Virgin Islands, 77% of cell sites are out of service.

With the widespread power outages in Puerto Rico it is assumed that cable Internet services are also offline for most customers, but the FCC had not received any data on the status of the networks.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

FCC: Cell sites being restored, wireline outages worsening

As of September 13, 2017 at 11:00 AM EDT, substantial numbers of cell sites remain out of services in areas impacted by Hurricane Irma, but the situation is improving, according to data from the FCC.

  • Alabama: Less than 1% of cell sites in the disaster area are out of service
  • Florida: 18.1% (down from 24.6% yesterday) of cell sites are out of service.
  • Georgia: Overall, 5.3% (down from 10.5% yesterday) of cell sites in the disaster area are out of
  • service.
  • Puerto Rico: 10.1% (down from 14.5% yesterday) of cell sites are out of service.
  • Virgin Islands: 54.7% (up from 53.8%) of cell sites are out of service.

However, the the outage is growing for cable and fixed wireline systems.  There are at least 8,190,407 (up from 7,184,909 yesterday) subscribers out of service in the affectedareas in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia.

There are a total of 1,040 (up from 819 yesterday) non-mobile switching centers out in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia.

http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2017/db0913/DOC-346710A1.pdf

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

FCC: Over 3,000 Cell Sites Still Down in Florida

As of September 12, 2017 at 11:00 AM EDT, there were still significant numbers of cell sites down in geographic areas impacted by Hurricane Irma, according to data from the FCC.

Alabama: Less than 1% of cell sites in the disaster area are out of service.
Florida: 24.6% (down from 27.4% yesterday) of the cell sites are out of service. There are 14,730 cell sites in this area, of which 3,618 are out of service
Georgia: 10.5% of the cell sites in the disaster area are out of service.
Puerto Rico: 14.5% (down from 19.4% yesterday) of cell sites are out of service.
U.S. Virgin Islands: 53.8% (down from 55.1%) of cell sites are out of service.

Counties with 50% or greater of cell sites out are:
Alabama: None
Florida: Collier, Hendry, Highlands, Monroe, and Union
Georgia: Wilkes (1 of 2 cell sites is out of service.)
Puerto Rico: Aguas Buenas, Juncos, and Vieques
U.S. Virgin Islands: St. John and St. Thomas

Wireline and cable outages are also significant. The FCC reported at least 7,184,909 (down from 7,597,945 yesterday) subscribers remain out of service in the affected areas in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia.

There are a total of 819 (up from 390 yesterday) non-mobile switching centers out in Florida, none in Alabama and Georgia.

The FCC also reported that large percentages of consumers in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands are without either cable services or wireline due to ongoing power outages.

http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2017/db0912/DOC-346690A1.pdf

Monday, September 11, 2017

FCC: Cell Site Outages Continue in Florida and Puerto Rico

As of September 11, 2017 at 11:00 AM EDT, 27.4% of the cell sites in the disaster area in Florida are out of service. According to the FCC's latest status report, 50% or more of cell sites are out of service in the following Florida counties: Collier, Hendry, Highlands, Lee, Miami-Dade, and Monroe.

In Puerto Rico/U.S. Virgin Islands, 21.5% of cell sites are offline (an improvement from from 26.9% on Sunday).

In addition, there are at least 7,597,945 cable system or wireline subscribers in Florida out of serviceThere are a total of 390 non-mobile switching centers out in Florida.

http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2017/db0911/DOC-346655A1.pdf

See also