Showing posts with label CoreOS. Show all posts
Showing posts with label CoreOS. Show all posts

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Red Hat to acquire CoreOS for Kubernetes platform

Red Hat agreed to acquire CoreOS, a developer of Kubernetes and container-native solutions, for $250 million.

CoreOS, which was founded in 2013 and is based in San Francisco, offers a commercial Kubernetes platform that let's customer build "Google-style" where workloads and applications placed in containers can be moved rapidly across clouds. CoreOS Tectonic is an enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform that provides automated operations, enables portability across private and public cloud providers, and is based on open source software. The company also offers CoreOS Quay, an enterprise-ready container registry. CoreOS is also well-known for being a leading contributor to Kubernetes; Container Linux, a lightweight Linux distribution created and maintained by CoreOS that automates software updates and is streamlined for running containers; etcd, the distributed data store for Kubernetes; and rkt, an application container engine, donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), that helped drive the current Open Container Initiative (OCI) standard.

Red Hat said the deal furthers its vision of enabling customers to build any application and deploy them in any environment with the flexibility afforded by open source.

“The next era of technology is being driven by container-based applications that span multi- and hybrid cloud environments, including physical, virtual, private cloud and public cloud platforms. Kubernetes, containers and Linux are at the heart of this transformation, and, like Red Hat, CoreOS has been a leader in both the upstream open source communities that are fueling these innovations and its work to bring enterprise-grade Kubernetes to customers. We believe this acquisition cements Red Hat as a cornerstone of hybrid cloud and modern app deployments,” stated Paul Cormier, president, Products and Technologies, Red Hat.


  • In May 2016, CoreOS received $28 million in Series B funding round led by GV (formerly Google Ventures). Intel Capital participated in the round, as well as existing investors Accel, Fuel Capital, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB), Y Combinator Continuity Fund and others, bringing the company’s funding to date to $48 million.

Friday, November 4, 2016

CoreOS Introduces Operators for Kubernetes

CoreOS announced "Operators" - a new capability for making applications easier to run and update on Kubernetes.

An Operator is application-specific software that extends the Kubernetes API to create, configure, and manage instances of complex stateful applications on behalf of a Kubernetes user. Like the built-in Kubernetes API resources, it doesn't manage just a single instance of the application, but multiple instances across the entire cluster.

“An Operator makes managing complex software on top of Kubernetes easy," said Brandon Philips, CTO of CoreOS. "It is for all of those apps that aren't simple to horizontally scale. The big idea is that by installing an operator into your cluster you will get powerful new capabilities like being able to on-demand deploy new distributed databases or monitoring services declaratively with simple commands. This is another step forward in making distributed systems easy to install, run and update.“

https://coreos.com/press/coreos-introduces-operators.html
https://coreos.com/blog/introducing-operators.html

Thursday, August 6, 2015

CoreOS Integrates Kubernetes with Mirantis OpenStack

CoreOS is integrating its "Tectonic" commercial distribution of Kubernetes with Mirantis OpenStack.

Mirantis said adding Tectonic to Mirantis OpenStack will provide the functionality of Kubernetes, as well as additional features such as an easy-to-use UI, enabling one-click deployment of both Tectonic and Tectonic-managed applications.

https://www.mirantis.com/blog/coreos-tectonic-mirantis-openstack-business/


In April, CoreOS, a San Francisco start-up building a new Linux distribution for modern infrastructure stacks, introduced Tectonic, its commercial Kubernetes platform.

Tectonic, which combines Kubernetes and the CoreOS stack, pre-packages all of the components required to build "Google-style infrastructure."  CoreOS said it adds a number of commercial features to the mix, such as a management console for workflows and dashboards, an integrated registry to build and share Linux containers, and additional tools to automate deployment and customize rolling updates.

In addition, CoreOS announced a new $12 million round of funding led by Google Ventures, with additional investment from Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB), Fuel Capital and Accel Partners, bringing its total funding to $20 million.

Monday, April 6, 2015

CoreOS Announces "Tectonic" Kubernetes Platform, Google Investment

CoreOS, a San Francisco start-up building a new Linux distribution for modern infrastructure stacks, introduced Tectonic, its commercial Kubernetes platform.

Tectonic, which combines Kubernetes and the CoreOS stack, pre-packages all of the components required to build "Google-style infrastructure."  CoreOS said it adds a number of commercial features to the mix, such as a management console for workflows and dashboards, an integrated registry to build and share Linux containers, and additional tools to automate deployment and customize rolling updates.

In addition, CoreOS announced a new $12 million round of funding led by Google Ventures, with additional investment from Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB), Fuel Capital and Accel Partners, bringing its total funding to $20 million.

"When we started CoreOS, we set out to build and deliver Google's infrastructure to everyone else," said Alex Polvi, CEO of CoreOS. "Today, this goal is becoming a reality with Tectonic, which allows enterprises across the world to securely run containers in a distributed environment, similar to how Google runs their infrastructure internally."

"We see a broader industry trend where enterprise computing is shifting to mirror the infrastructure of large-scale software companies," said Dave Munichiello, Partner at Google Ventures. "With a focus on security, reliability, and ease of deployment CoreOS delivers a comprehensive platform for global enterprises to deliver services at scale. We are excited to be working with the team."

https://coreos.com/blog/announcing-tectonic/


In December 2014, CoreOS released Rocket, a new portable container format, as an alternative to the Docker runtime. The idea is to provide a “standard container” that can be used for moving workloads between multiple servers and environments. The company said its container consumes 40% less RAM on boot than an average Linux installation and features an active/passive dual-partition scheme to update the OS as a single unit instead of package by package. Applications on CoreOS can run as Docker containers.  Up until this announcement, CoreOS had been a big supporter of Docker. In a blog posting, the company said the Docker company has strayed from its early principle of building a simple, composable container unit that could be used in a variety of systems and supported by everyone. So CoreOS is now developing Rocket around the App Container specification and promoting it as a new set of simple and open specifications for a portable container format.

Monday, December 1, 2014

CoreOS Launches Rocket Container as Docker Alternative

CoreOS released Rocket, a new portable container format, as an alternative to the Docker runtime. The idea is to provide a “standard container” that can be used for moving workloads between multiple servers and environments.

CoreOS is a San Francisco start-up building a new Linux distribution for modern infrastructure stacks. It consumes 40% less RAM on boot than an average Linux installation and features an active/passive dual-partition scheme to update the OS as a single unit instead of package by package. Applications on CoreOS can run as Docker containers.

Until now, CoreOS has been a big supporter of Docker. In a blog posting, the company said the Docker company has strayed from its early principle of building a simple, composable container unit that could be used in a variety of systems and supported by everyone. So CoreOS is now developing Rocket around the App Container specification and promoting it as a new set of simple and open specifications for a portable container format.

https://coreos.com/blog/rocket/

https://github.com/coreos/rocket

See also