Showing posts with label AccelOps. Show all posts
Showing posts with label AccelOps. Show all posts

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Fortinet to Acquire AccelOps for Security Monitoring

Fortinet agreed to acquire AccelOps, a start-up based in Santa Clara, California, that specializes in network security monitoring and analytics solutions. Financial terms were not disclosed.

AccelOps’s virtual appliance software monitors security, performance and compliance in local and virtualized infrastructures, resulting in a unified view of the environment. The software discovers, analyzes and automates IT issues across multi-tenant or single networks, spanning servers, devices, storage, networks, security, applications and users.

Fortinet said the acquisition extends Fortinet’s recently announced Security Fabric strategy by enhancing network security visibility, security data analytics and threat intelligence across multi-vendor solutions. AccelOps solutions will become FortiSIEM and become part of the Fortinet Security Fabric, providing customers with greater visibility across both Fortinet and multi-vendor security solutions.

“Fortinet and AccelOps share a common vision of providing holistic, actionable security intelligence across the entire IT infrastructure. Our mission has always been to help our customers make security and compliance management as effortless and effective as possible. The synergies between AccelOps’s solutions and Fortinet’s Security Fabric vision and thought leadership will ensure that our customers are protected with the most scalable and proven global threat intelligence, security and performance analytics and compliance and control across all types of network environments with multiple security and networking vendor products,” stated Partha Bhattacharya, founder and chief technology officer, AccelOps.

http://www.fortinet.com
http://www.accelops.com/

Blueprint: Endpoint Visibility in the IoT



A Five-Step Action Plan for Securing the Network in the Age of IoT by Tom Kelly, CEO, AccelOps A report from BI Intelligence projects that Internet of Things (IoT) deployments will create $421 billion in economic value for cities worldwide in 2019. Cities will enjoy benefits such as improved traffic flow, a reduction in air pollution and better public safety. This is just one example of the advancements the IoT will bring to all sectors. However,...


Blueprint: Three Predictions for Network Monitoring in 2016



by Tom Kelly, CEO, AccelOps Why do armies set up look-outs all around their camps? Why do people read their horoscopes and shake magic eight-balls? Simple: they want to see what’s coming. In business, it’s incredibly helpful to be able to accurately forecast needs and set strategy. In the network security and performance arena of the business, it’s table stakes. While there’s no crystal ball that can tell us everything, one thing is certain:...


AccelOps Builds Threat Intelligence into its Actionable Security Platform


AccelOps, a start-up based in Santa Clara, California, introduced threat intelligence capabilities for its integrated IT and operational visibility platform. The existing AccelOps virtual appliance software monitors security, performance and compliance in cloud and virtualized infrastructures on a single screen. It automatically discovers, analyzes and automates IT issues in machine and big data across organizations’ data centers and cloud resources,...

Monday, April 11, 2016

Blueprint: Endpoint Visibility in the IoT

A Five-Step Action Plan for Securing the Network in the Age of IoT

by Tom Kelly, CEO, AccelOps

A report from BI Intelligence projects that Internet of Things (IoT) deployments will create $421 billion in economic value for cities worldwide in 2019. Cities will enjoy benefits such as improved traffic flow, a reduction in air pollution and better public safety.

This is just one example of the advancements the IoT will bring to all sectors. However, along with all the positives comes the negative of heightened security concerns. The IoT represents a proliferation of endpoints such as has never been experienced, and at a stunning rate.

All these endpoints are creating pinholes across the enterprise security landscape. It is clear that the malicious intent of hackers has not only increased, but it has become more creative. The reality is that the IoT is changing everything, especially cyber security, and without the proper tools, it is nearly impossible to know what is connecting to your network.

The IoT’s Dark Side

Smart devices have proven to be a double-edged sword. While delivering greater work efficiencies, they also offer more inroads for crime. By using connected devices that are agentless, malicious actors are able to gain access to corporate networks and may not be discovered until after an attack.

To add to the problem, the vendor landscape has become more complex. CISOs now must extend their security monitoring policies and procedures to incorporate every supplier and vendor in the supply chain, no matter how benign their products might seem to network security.

A real-world example will serve to drive the point home. A major carrier recently suffered a breach, resulting in hackers posting 300,000 customer records online. Imagine the look on the CEO’s face when he learned that the data was stolen from a third-party marketing firm involved in the carrier’s supply chain. Smart CISOs and CIOs must look to implement vendor risk management processes as part of their own operational security reviews before they find themselves facing an angry board of directors who are looking for answers as to how the latest breach occurred.

Five Recommendations for Today’s Network Security

Security, availability and compliance have become inextricably linked as a result of the hyper-connected world of cloud-based apps, sensors and mobile devices. More importantly, if you can’t see it, you can’t protect it, so before proceeding, be sure you know what is connecting to your network.

Here are five recommendations to manage the corporate IoT environment.

1. Analyze and measure it to fix it. Turn to real-time network topology monitoring and best practices to improve correlation accuracy. Best-of-breed solutions incorporate rich analytics collection and cross-correlation along with third party big data analytics tools to help network and security operations personnel apply methods that are faster and more accurate. If you can’t measure it, you can’t fix it.

2. Analyze root causes and cross-correlate. It’s no longer good enough to simply monitor your network. Today’s security challenges require that network operations and security operations work together to ingest all meaningful data for analysis. Gone are the days of keeping technology domains in silos. Correlate across security, availability and performance for events, logs and configuration files. By pulling together all available network data, it is possible to turn data collection into a weapon against hackers and create actionable information that provides a mechanism for improved root cause analysis.

3. Compare intention to behavior. Network forensics will be easier if you map user identities, locations and behaviors. Look for solutions that help ingest more than just an event, but also correlate performance, log and security data. Additionally, by looking at user IDs, locations and behavior patterns, you can determine if the user connecting to the network through proper login and password entries is authorized or is a malicious actor with stolen credentials.

4. Use visual analytics to describe security health. Does upper management understand what has happened after a breach? With accountability moving down the chain of command, it is more important than ever to use the language of the business stakeholder. Communicate issues so that business people understand how IT affects the health of the business.

5. Manage compliance for audits proactively. Look for solutions that report across common compliance frameworks such as PCI, ITIL, COBIT, SOX, HIPAA etc. No matter your industry, establish a compliance posture for formalized management and gain a deep understanding of how compliance failures may affect your organization, looking beyond the revenue impacts and potential for fines, plus embarrassing media exposure, to things like impact on brand, reputation, trust with customers, supplier relationships and employee productivity.

Keeping IoT Devices in Check

There’s no practical way around IoT devices connecting to the network. These devices provide the promise of many new and useful tools in their ability to perform business better and to predict unforeseen risks. Where you have identified the needs for IoT devices in your organization, insure you fully understand the risk benefit analysis, before deploying them. Methodologies such as Synthetic Transaction Monitoring can help you safely identify what the baseline behavior, or “normal” functionality, is as well as expected behaviors for how it should interact with other devices, and applications in the network.

Like any vulnerable and protected resource, it is important to insure these devices are kept behind trusted firewalls and, as with any device in your network, constantly monitor them for changes against normal. Other best-practice methods include establishing a “multi-tenant” reporting environment consolidating and isolating IoT devices into a unique and highly granulated reporting domain.

About the author

Tom Kelly is a technology industry veteran, having led companies through founding, growth, IPO and strategic acquisition. He has served as a CEO, COO or CFO at Cadence Design Systems, Frame Technology, Cirrus Logic, Epicor Software and Blaze Software.  Tom led successful turnarounds at Bluestar Solutions, MonteVista Software and Moxie Software, having served as CEO in repositioning and rebranding the companies in advance of their new growth. He serves on the Boards of Directors of FEI, Fabrinet, and ReadyPulse.  Tom is a graduate of Santa Clara University where he is member of the University’s Board of Regents.



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See our guidelines.

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Blueprint: Three Predictions for Network Monitoring in 2016

by Tom Kelly, CEO, AccelOps

Why do armies set up look-outs all around their camps? Why do people read their horoscopes and shake magic eight-balls? Simple: they want to see what’s coming. In business, it’s incredibly helpful to be able to accurately forecast needs and set strategy. In the network security and performance arena of the business, it’s table stakes.

While there’s no crystal ball that can tell us everything, one thing is certain: organizations will need to fundamentally change the way they identify and manage threats. Below are my three predictions on this topic for the new year.

  1. It’s time to outsource security. With the unprecedented benefits and growth of the Internet of Things (IoT) and the vast number of touch points connecting to the network, new challenges and unknown risks associated with these tools will continue to multiply. Unknown risks include network and resource utilization, performance expectations and resource needs, interoperability with current systems and tools and, above all else, security risks and challenges to an organization’s livelyhood. As IT budgets shrink, and a shrinking pool of technical personnel, organizations will increasingly look outside their silos to managed security service providers (MSSP’s) for expert help.
  2. Organizations will map the customer journey. Consumers today have access to nearly infinite sources of information through the click of a mouse, resulting in a higher level of expectation for rapid answers from a variety of engagement channels. From websites to social media to mobile and multi-media, organizations are tasked with keeping up with customer demands from an ever-increasing set of “touch-points.” To that end, organizations will turn to tools that map and analyze a “360 view” of their customers’ journey and the respective “touch-points” throughout their organizations. As this integrated security and performance management requirement transitions from a tactical IT expenditure-driven initiative to a mission-critical, strategic business initiative, the era of CIOs and CISOs reporting to CFOs will shift to stronger oversight by boards of directors and CEOs.
  3. Businesses intelligence sources will converge. Proprietary customer and financial data and intellectual property are high-value targets for hackers. The challenge in protecting these targets will continue to grow as organizations become more reliant on business intelligence and analytics (Big Data) to dissect their various channels of customer engagement, workers, network and application productivity. As organizations store this valuable data in onsite and offsite locations (or a variety of both), Big Data is seen as a big target. These rich and proprietary sources of corporate analytics will spawn new and additional targets for hackers. Current silo-based approaches will need to converge with other business intelligence initiatives to provide more rapid identification and mitigation of risks.
Today’s dynamic, data-driven businesses have never been more reliant on the performance of their networks in managing risk and in the pursuit of their strategic initiatives. These same networks have never been more at risk for security breaches and the network performance impacts. With digital transformation in full swing, the pace of change is rapidly accelerating, and an organization’s ability to see into the network through solutions that provide a holistic, real-time view and correlation of the various elements in their network is becoming more critical than ever.

About the Author

Tom Kelly is CEO of Accelops and a technology industry veteran having led companies through founding, growth, IPO and strategic acquisition. He has served as a CEO, COO or CFO at Cadence Design Systems, Frame Technology, Cirrus Logic, Epicor Software and Blaze Software. Tom led successful turnarounds at Bluestar Solutions, MonteVista Software and Moxie Software, having served as CEO in repositioning and rebranding the companies in advance of their new growth. He serves on the Boards of Directors of FEI, Fabrinet, and ReadyPulse. Tom is a graduate of Santa Clara University where he is member of the University’s Board of Regents.

Got an idea for a Blueprint column?  We welcome your ideas on next gen network architecture.
See our guidelines.

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

AccelOps Builds Threat Intelligence into its Actionable Security Platform

AccelOps, a start-up based in Santa Clara, California, introduced threat intelligence capabilities for its integrated IT and operational visibility platform.


The existing AccelOps virtual appliance software monitors security, performance and compliance in cloud and virtualized infrastructures on a single screen. It automatically discovers, analyzes and automates IT issues in machine and big data across organizations’ data centers and cloud resources, spanning servers, storage, networks, security, applications and users.


A new Threat Intelligence Center for the platform offers a "Content as a Service” (CaaS) capability to aggregate, validate and share anonymous threat data gathered from the AccelOps customer base, providing benchmark and threat detection intelligence to customers in real time. Also included are additional device support, rules updates, reports and other knowledge bases. AccelOps features an open API that allows users to integrate any public or private threat feed into the AccelOps database and cross-correlate it with their own network and security data. It also supports a Workflow Integration API that creates bi-directional workflow integration into leading IT service management and ticketing solutions, including ServiceNow and Connectwise.

“As a leading provider of threat and operational intelligence, our main objective is to deliver the tools our clients need to stay ahead of the encroaching end point data infiltrating today’s modern data center. These enhancements extend the capabilities of our threat intelligence, providing our customers with even greater insight into the health, security and management of their networks,” stated Dan Maloney, vice president of marketing and business development, AccelOps.

http://www.accelops.com


See also