Showing posts with label Academia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Academia. Show all posts

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

NTT Research partners with leading U.S. universities

NTT Research's Physics and Informatics (PHI) Lab has reached joint research agreements with six universities, one government agency, and one private company.

The PHI Lab, which is focused on a new computing paradigm created in the interdisciplinary field between quantum physics, neuroscience, and optical technology, has struck five-year agreements with California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Cornell University, University of Michigan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, Stanford University, Swinburne University of Technology, and quantum computing software company 1QBit.

“Having launched only four months ago, we are excited to have reached agreements with eight of the world’s top research organizations with interests and expertise in the three fields crucial to our mission: quantum-to-classical crossover physics, neural networks, and optical parametric oscillators,” said NTT Research PHI Lab Director Yamamoto. “Over the next five years, we believe our collaboration will uncover novel principles and technologies that advance information processing beyond the current state of the art.”

“These agreements reflect our belief that a new computing model requires teamwork, in the broadest and best sense of that word,” said Kazuhiro Gomi, President and CEO, NTT Research. “They also represent our respect for the talent and expertise of our primary investigator collaborators and the promise of their research teams.”

Summaries of the eight agreements follow:

  • Caltech – Primary goal: to develop a scalable architecture for efficient quantum simulation of many-body systems using optical parametric oscillator (OPO) networks. PI: Alireza Marandi, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics.
  • Cornell – Primary goal: to develop a quantum neural network (QNN) based on error detection and error correction feedback. PI: Peter McMahon, Assistant Professor of Applied and Engineering Physics.
  • Michigan – Primary goal: to perform theoretical studies of topological states in nonlinear optics and synthetic topological matter. PI: Franco Nori, Affiliated Faculty, Department of Physics.
  • MIT – Primary goal: to develop the photonic accelerators for deep learning and the superconducting coherent Ising machines (CIMs) for optimization. PIs: Dirk Englund, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; and Will Oliver, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Professor of the Practice of Physics.
  • NASA Ames Research Center – Primary goal: to perform benchmark studies of CIMs vs. modern heuristics on various optimization problems. PI: Eleanor Rieffel, Lead, Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.
  • Stanford – Primary goal: to develop novel optical and superconducting devices for studying the quantum-to-classical crossover physics and critical phenomena in the quantum neural network. PI: Hideo Mabuchi, Professor of Applied Physics; and co-PIs: Martin Fejer, Professor of Applied Physics; Benjamin Lev, Associate Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics; Surya Ganguli, Associate Professor of Applied Physics; and Amir Safavi-Naeini, Assistant Professor of Applied Physics.
  • Swinburne – Primary goal: to develop and implement the theoretical models for CIMs. PIs: Peter Drummond, Distinguished Professor and Science Director, Centre for Quantum and Optical Science (CQOS); and Margaret Reid, Professor of Physics, School of Science, CQOS, and Department of Physics and Astronomy.
  • 1QBit – Primary goal: to perform research in design and analysis of a stack of algorithms that bridge commercially viable applications to the forms of computation natively done by CIMs, with a multitude of applications in operations research and artificial intelligence. PI: Pooya Ronagh, Head of Hardware Innovation 


Innovative Optical and Wireless Network Forum launched by NTT


NTT, Intel and Sony are joining forces to create a new Innovative Optical and Wireless Network (IOWN) Global Forum, which aims to accelerate the adoption of new communications infrastructure. The goal is to will bring together an all-photonic network including silicon photonics, edge computing, and distributed connected computing, along with wireless access.. IOWN will develop new technologies, frameworks, specifications and reference designs, in...


Thursday, April 11, 2019

Penn State researchers develop new germanosilicate glass

Researchers at Penn State have developed a new composition of germanosilicate glass by adding zinc oxide has properties good for lens applications.

The researchers invented a new family of zinc germanosilicate glass that has a high refractive index comparable to that of pure germania glass. The samples also showed high transparency, good ultra-violet-shielding properties, and good glass forming ability, making them suitable for lens applications.

Germanosilicate glass is essential in the manufacture of optical amplifiers, waveguides, and solid-state lasers.

The researchers published their results in a recent issue of the Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids.

https://news.psu.edu/story/567138/2019/04/03/research/new-family-glass-good-lenses

Monday, February 18, 2019

Tokyo Tech's 28 GHz transceiver with dual-polarized MIMO hits 15 Gbps

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a 28 GHz transceiver that integrates beamforming with dual-polarized multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) technology.

Preliminary testing showed that the maximum data rate achieved was 15 Gbps using 64-QAM.

The transceiver measures just 3 mm by 4 mm and could help improve performances of 5G and Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

"Compared with the conventional switch-based bi-directional approach, our bi-directional amplifier completely shares the inter-stage matching networks between the transceiver and the receiver. Thus, the required on-chip area is further minimized," states Kenichi Okada at Tokyo Tech's Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Tokyo Tech develops atomic clock for small satellites

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ricoh co. and Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology have developed an ultra-low-power atomic clock (ULPAC) for small satellites.

The fully functional atomic clock consumes an order of magnitude less power than that of previously reported devices. It also excels in two other critical aspects: volume occupied and Allan deviation, which is a measure of the stability of the frequency of a clock.

https://www.titech.ac.jp/english/news/research/


Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Photonic memory research at Eindhoven University of Technology

Researchers of the Institute of Photonic Integration of the Eindhoven University of Technology are developing a hybrid memory that combines photonic properties and magnetic hard drives.

The idea is to use femtosecond light pulses to write data directly in a magnetic memory.

"The switching of the magnetization direction using the single-pulse all-optical switching is in the order of picoseconds, which is about a 100 to 1000 times faster than what is possible with today's technology. Moreover, as the optical information is stored in magnetic bits without the need of energy-costly electronics, it holds enormous potential for future use in photonic integrated circuits," states Mark Lalieu, Ph.D. candidate at the Applied Physics Department of TU/e.

https://www.tue.nl/en/news/news-overview/10-01-2019-next-generation-photonic-memory-devices-are-light-written-ultrafast-and-energy-efficient/



Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Researchers at Duke test photonic crystal waveguide

Researchers at Duke University have demonstrated a photonic crystal waveguide capable of directing photons of light around sharp corners with virtually no losses due to backscattering.

The photonic crystal waveguide was built on the concept of topological insulators. A research paper on the topic was published in the November 12 issue of Nature Nanotechnology and an overview is posted on the university's website.

The smaller the device the better, but of course we’re trying to minimize losses as well,” said Wiktor Walasik, a postdoctoral associate in electrical and computer engineering at Duke. “There are a lot of people working to make an all-optical computing system possible. We’re not there yet, but I think that’s the direction we’re going.”

https://pratt.duke.edu/about/news/optical-waveguide

Monday, September 24, 2018

ECOC 2018: Cambridge develops graphene-based tunable lasers

Dr. Andrea Ferrari, director of the Cambridge Graphene Centre, which is part of the University of Cambridge, presented research on wavelength tunable lasers in single-layer graphene.

The technology shows potential for use in on-chip optical switches.

https://www.graphene.cam.ac.uk/
https://www.graphene.cam.ac.uk/news/graphene-high-speed-communications


Sunday, August 5, 2018

MIT researchers develop silicon-based optical filter

Researchers from MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronic have designed an optical filter on a chip that can process optical signals from across an extremely wide spectrum of light at once.

“This new filter takes an extremely broad range of wavelengths within its bandwidth as input and efficiently separates it into two output signals, regardless of exactly how wide or at what wavelength the input is. That capability didn’t before in integrated optics,” says Emir Salih Magden, a former PhD student in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and first author on a paper describing the filters published today in Nature Communications.

Potential applications include fiber-to-the-home installations.

http://news.mit.edu/2018/chip-optical-filter-processes-wide-range-light-wavelengths-0801

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Stanford researchers train neural network using optical chip

Researchers at Stanford University have demonstrated the ability to train artificial neural networks directly on an optical chip.

Neural network processing currently relies on conventional computers.  The Optical Society's journal for high impact research, Stanford University researchers report a method for training these networks directly in the device by implementing an optical analogue of the ‘backpropagation’ algorithm, which is the standard way to train conventional neural networks.

“Using an optical chip to perform neural network computations more efficiently than is possible with digital computers could allow more complex problems to be solved,” said research team leader Shanhui Fan of Stanford University. “This would enhance the capability of artificial neural networks to perform tasks required for self-driving cars or to formulate an appropriate response to a spoken question, for example. It could also improve our lives in ways we can’t imagine now.”

https://www.osapublishing.org/optica/abstract.cfm?uri=optica-5-7-864




Saturday, July 7, 2018

Ericsson opens 5G Lab at the Indian Institute of Technology (Delhi)

Ericsson has established a Centre of Excellence (CoE) and Innovation Lab for 5G at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi.

In addition, Ericsson conducted India’s first 5G over the air beam tracking demonstration on 3.5GHz spectrum using a pre-commercial end-to-end system including 5G-NR, VRAN and VCORE. The demonstration includes 3GPP 5G NR Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) antenna technology with adaptive beamforming and beam tracking techniques.

Speaking on the occasion, Shri Manoj Sinha, Minister of State for Communications (I/C) and Minister of State for Railways, said: “I would like to congratulate Ericsson for taking the lead in terms of setting up the first 5G Center of Excellence and Innovation Lab in the country. The 5G Center of Excellence supports the Government’s plans to foster a robust and vibrant 5G ecosystem in India. We want India to be an active participant in the design, development and manufacture of 5G-based technologies, products and apps.”

Prof. V. Ramgopal Rao, Director, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi stated, “We at IIT Delhi are committed to collaborating with industry and Government to develop technologies that enable connectivity for millions. We take pride in hosting the Ericsson Center of Excellence and Innovation Lab, thereby playing a pivotal role for the industry and academia to come together, test out new technologies and explore the full potential of 5G.”

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Belgium's KU Leuven selects ADVA's FSP 3000 CloudConnect

The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KU Leuven), a leading research university in Flanders, Belgium, has deployed ADVA's FSP 3000 CloudConnect to enable 32Gbit/s Fibre Channel and 100Gbit/s Ethernet services.

KU Leuven's research and education (R&E) network is the first in the region to support Gen 6 Fibre Channel technology.

The deployment uses ADVA's FSP 3000 CloudConnect platform along with its QuadFlex line card and OpenFabric cross-connect – two technologies optimized for maximum flexibility and efficiency in metro data center interconnect networks.

ADVA’s Elite partner Arcadiz Telecom, which played a key role in the rigorous planning and smooth installation of the transport system, will also provide ongoing maintenance support.

“Through our close partnership with Arcadiz Telecom, we’ve been able to work with KU Leuven to push the boundaries of possibility for R&E networks. We’ve created a transport system capable of carrying much higher data volumes than has ever been achieved in this area before. It’s also a future-proof investment ready to scale even further in years to come,” commented Yann Evain, sales director, Benelux, ADVA. “One of the advantages of this network is that it enables KU Leuven’s data centers to maximize the performance of flash-optimized storage arrays. Having rapid access to phenomenal amounts of data frees academics to achieve even more. The new solution also delivers huge energy savings and, with its incredibly small footprint, occupies very little rack space. Its inherent scalability protects KU Leuven’s investments, helping the university maintain its reputation as a global technology leader and its top position in Reuters’ rankings of Europe’s most innovative universities.”

https://www.advaoptical.com

Friday, June 8, 2018

NTT DOCOMO joins Stanford Data Science Initiative

NTT DOCOMO has joined the corporate affiliate program of the Stanford Data Science Initiative (SDSI).

The SDSI affiliate program, which was set-up in 2014, facilitates collaborative research between the private sector and faculty studying data-science and big-data at Stanford University's School of Engineering. NTT DOCOMO researchers will visit Stanford on a short-term basis.


Tuesday, May 29, 2018

NYU develops AR learning tool using Verizon's 5G testbed

NYU’s Future Reality Lab are using Verizon’s pre-commercial 5G technology at Alley, a co-working space and site of Verizon’s 5G incubator in New York City, to develop ChalkTalk, an open source AR learning tool that renders multimedia objects in 3D.

The idea is to use AR on mobile devices to create more effective learning tools that are able to update and respond in real time as the instructor makes his or her point.

“We’ve been able to test and experiment with the 5G technology,” said NYU's Dr. Ken Perlin. “We’re looking at simple use cases now, but will be looking at more involved, more interesting applications as time goes on.”

http://www.verizon.com/about/news/chalktalk--using-5g-and-ar-enhance-learning-experience

Monday, April 23, 2018

MIT: a new technique for assembling on-chip optics and electronics separately

A team of researchers led by groups at MIT, the University of California at Berkeley, and Boston University, have developed a technique for assembling on-chip optics and electronics separately using existing manufacturing processes.

The work, which is described in an article in the latest issue of Nature, allows the addition of optical communication components onto chips with modern transistors.

“The most promising thing about this work is that you can optimize your photonics independently from your electronics,” says Amir Atabaki, a research scientist at MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics and one of three first authors on the new paper. “We have different silicon electronic technologies, and if we can just add photonics to them, it’d be a great capability for future communications and computing chips. For example, now we could imagine a microprocessor manufacturer or a GPU manufacturer like Intel or Nvidia saying, ‘This is very nice. We can now have photonic input and output for our microprocessor or GPU.’ And they don’t have to change much in their process to get the performance boost of on-chip optics.”

http://news.mit.edu/2018/integrating-optical-components-existing-chip-designs-0419

Sunday, January 28, 2018

University of Guam lights 100G GOREX

The University of Guam is now connected to the global Research and Education Network fabric at 100G.

The GOREX network—or Guam Open Research & Education eXchange—connects Guam to Hawaii and California via the new SEA-U.S. fibre-optic submarine cable.

The Marine Laboratory and the Water Environmental Research Institute at the university are two of the academic groups expected to benefit the most from GOREX at the onset, although UOG president Robert Underwood believes the true impact to the island community is in the opportunity for data access, exchange, and analysis in other fields such as healthcare, economics, and the social sciences.

“We can now conduct research at complex levels, not just for the sciences, but in other fields as well,” said Underwood. “Think about the issues that we discuss as a society and how we make many decisions with limited data. GOREX gives our students and faculty the tools to truly exchange and analyze large amounts of data in any number of fields with other institutions all over the world. And as a university, it is our responsibility to report our findings back to the community. That’s the impact.”

https://gorex.uog.edu/



Sunday, October 1, 2017

The Pacific Wave Peering Exchange continues to expand

Pacific Wave International Exchange and its peering and science DMZ fabrics will be extended to Texas’s Lonestar Education and Research Network (LEARN) and Oklahoma’s OneNet thanks to support from the National Science Foundation.

The Pacific Wave SDX, which is a project of the Corporation for Education Networking in California (CENIC) and Pacific Northwest Gigapop (PNWGP), is an integral component of the international effort to interconnect research and education networks using Software Defined Networking (SDN).  Pacific Wave operates multiple open exchange peering points available at three U.S. Pacific coast locations, including the Bay Area (Sunnyvale and Palo Alto), Los Angeles (three sites), and Seattle; three U.S. interior locations in Denver, Albuquerque, and El Paso; and two sites in Tokyo, Japan. It comprises multiple, geographically diverse 100Gbps connections – in Seattle, Los Angeles and Chicago – to Internet2’s backbone nodes and full range of advanced network capabilities. Pacific Wave also operates an SDX testbed with access points in Los Angeles, Seattle and Sunnyvale, and including teaming relationships with StarLight, WIDE/T-REX and others to pilot more global interoperability of next-generation SDX capabilities.

LEARN and OneNet will connect to Pacific Wave via the Western Regional Network (WRN). WRN is an R&E extension of Pacific Wave, created and supported by a collaboration of the major Western Regional R&E optical networks: Front Range Gigapop (CO and WY), New Mexico Gigapop, University of Hawaii, Pacific Northwest Gigapop (WA, AK, MT, ND) and CENIC (CA). WRN employs a dedicated 100Gbps wavelength-based network infrastructure, including “dark channels” provided by Internet2, that spans the West and also reaches Pacific Wave’s international exchange point collaborator, StarLight, in Chicago, thereby making most European R&E networks directly accessible to WRN participants.

Saturday, September 9, 2017

IBM and MIT to open Artificial Intelligence lab

IBM announced a 10-year, $240 million investment to create the MIT–IBM Watson AI Lab in partnership with MIT.

The MIT–IBM Watson AI Lab aims to advance AI hardware, software and algorithms related to deep learning and other areas, increase AI’s impact on industries, such as health care and cybersecurity, and explore the economic and ethical implications of AI on society.

The lab will be co-chaired by IBM Research VP of AI and IBM Q, Dario Gil, and Anantha P. Chandrakasan, dean of MIT’s School of Engineering.

"The field of artificial intelligence has experienced incredible growth and progress over the past decade. Yet today’s AI systems, as remarkable as they are, will require new innovations to tackle increasingly difficult real-world problems to improve our work and lives,” said Dr. John Kelly III, IBM senior vice president, Cognitive Solutions and Research. “The extremely broad and deep technical capabilities and talent at MIT and IBM are unmatched, and will lead the field of AI for at least the next decade."

“I am delighted by this new collaboration,” says MIT President L. Rafael Reif. “True breakthroughs are often the result of fresh thinking inspired by new kinds of research teams. The combined MIT and IBM talent dedicated to this new effort will bring formidable power to a field with staggering potential to advance knowledge and help solve important challenges.”

http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/53091.wss

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Researchers at Brown University Test Terahertz Wireless Transmission

Researchers at Brown University achieved wireless throughput of 50 Gbps when transmitting video signals through a terahertz multiplexer. Results of the experiment were published in Nature Communications. Signals propagated as directional beams.

"We showed that we can transmit separate data streams on terahertz waves at very high speeds and with very low error rates,” said Daniel Mittleman, a professor in Brown’s School of Engineering and the paper’s corresponding author. “This is the first time anybody has characterized a terahertz multiplexing system using actual data, and our results show that our approach could be viable in future terahertz wireless networks.”

Backers of the research include the U.S. National Science Foundation, the U.S. Army Research Office, the W.M. Keck Foundation and France’s Agence Nationale de la Recherche under the COM’TONIQ and TERALINKS research grants.

http://news.brown.edu/articles/2017/08/multiplexer


Wednesday, August 9, 2017

California's CENIC extends fibre lease with Level 3 to 2040

CENIC (Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California), the organisation that provides global connectivity for education and research institutions in California, announced an agreement to extend its fibre leases, called indefeasible rights of use (IRUs), with Level 3 Communications on more than 8,000 miles of dark fibre until 2040.
Through the collaboration, Level 3 provides CENIC with access to its extensive fibre network to serve the organisation's 11,000-member institutions, including universities, schools, libraries and other cultural, scientific and arts organisations across California.

Regarding the renewed lease agreement, Louis Fox, president and CEO of CENIC, noted, "CENIC's next generation terabit network, CENIC 2.0, will have even greater user control and visibility, automation and software capacities for security, computation, and storage".



  • In December 2016, the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources Division (UC ANR) and CENIC announced they had connected key UC ANR facilities to CENIC's 100 Gbit/s research and education network, extending ultra-broadband capacity to UC researchers in rural sites across California.
  • UC ANR operates nine Research and Extension Centers (RECS), plus 57 local UC Cooperative Extension offices, in locations ranging from the Oregon border in the north, through the Sierra foothills and Central Valley, along the Pacific Coast and south to the Mexican border.
  • CENIC is a non-profit organisation that operates the California Research and Education Network (CalREN) high-capacity network that connects over 20 million users, including most K-20 students, with educators, researchers and other public institutions. It also provides connectivity to leading institutions and industry research organisations worldwide.

Thursday, June 1, 2017

AT&T Foundry and Caltech plan Alliance for Quantum Technologies

The AT&T Foundry innovation centre in Palo Alto, California announced that it is teaming with the California Institute of Technology to form the Alliance for Quantum Technologies (AQT), with the aims of bringing together industry, government and academia to accelerate the development of quantum technology and to address practical applications.

The collaboration will also establish a research and development program named INQNET (INtelligent Quantum NEtworks and Technologies), which will focus on meeting demand for capacity and security in communications leveraging advanced quantum networking technologies.

Under the new initiative, AT&T and Caltech, through AQT and INQNET, are seeking to create the model for technology development between academic institutions, industry and national laboratories. One of the first demonstrations of intelligent and quantum network technologies will involve quantum entanglement distribution and benchmarking and validation studies utilising commercial fibre provided by AT&T.

AT&T noted that quantum networking is expected to enable a new era of super-fast, secure networking, and through the AT&T Foundry it will support testing of relevant technologies for commercial applications.

AT&T explained that quantum computers will be unlike current systems, being effectively complex physics experiments employing cryogenics for cooling, lasers and other solid-state, electronic, optical and atomic devices. As a result, transitioning quantum computing from the R&D lab into the real world for practical applications will mean solving numerous technical and engineering challenges.

The science behind quantum computing is complex, extending across disciplines such as physics, engineering, computer science and applied mathematics, with the fundamental concept involving the application of the laws of quantum mechanics to processing and distributing information.


Such quantum computing systems are expected to provide exponentially greater computing power, while quantum networking entails linking quantum computers and devices together to create faster and more secure networks with capabilities beyond what is possible using conventional processors.


See also