Showing posts with label Academia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Academia. Show all posts

Friday, August 13, 2021

University of Michigan builds a 3 petawatt laser

The University of Michigan has been awarded $18.5 million by the National Science Foundation to establish it as a federally funded international user facility for its development of the 3 petawatt ZEUS (Zettawatt-Equivalent Ultrashort pulse laser System) laser. 

The name refers to the interaction of a PetaWatt laser pulse colliding with a GeV energy electron beam that can be generated by one of its two beamlines. This geometry provides the equivalent of a “Zettawatt” power laser interaction (1021 Watts) in the rest frame of the electron beam. 

“We are really looking forward to the exciting experiments that this new facility will make possible,” said Karl Krushelnick, director of the Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, where ZEUS’s construction is almost finished.

ZEUS will primarily be used to study extreme plasmas, a state of matter in which electrons break free of their atoms, forming what amounts to charged gases. ZEUS is expected to begin its first experiments in early 2022.

“Extreme plasma made with ‘table-top’ laser technology offers a lower-cost alternative for fundamental research in physics compared to large scale particle accelerators, which cost billions to build,” said Franko Bayer, project manager of the construction of ZEUS. “We are very excited since this support enables the U.S plasma science community, and us at U-M, to make long-term research plans.”

https://news.umich.edu/most-powerful-laser-in-the-us-to-begin-operations-soon-supported-by-18-5m-from-the-nsf/

https://zeus.engin.umich.edu/

Wednesday, June 23, 2021

SPIE and Vanderbilt announce fellowship in optics and photonics

SPIE and Vanderbilt University announced the establishment of the SPIE Faculty Fellowship in Optics and Photonics. A $500,000 gift from the SPIE Endowment Matching Program will be matched 100% by Vanderbilt. This is the eighth major SPIE gift to universities and institutes as part of the Society’s ongoing program to support the expansion of optical engineering teaching and research.

The SPIE Faculty Fellowship will support a Vanderbilt University faculty member who is working in optics and photonics. Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering Yuankai “Kenny” Tao has been selected as the recipient of the first gift.

Tao received his bachelor’s degrees in electrical and computer engineering and biomedical engineering, as well as a master’s degree and a PhD in biomedical engineering, from Duke University. 

“I am thrilled SPIE has chosen Vanderbilt Engineering as a recipient of an endowed faculty fellowship,” said Bruce and Bridgitt Evans Dean of Engineering Philippe Fauchet. “These investments provide critical support to our most promising young faculty to continue to develop their research programs and increase the school’s competitive advantage to recruit the best graduate students.”


Thursday, April 29, 2021

University of Surrey: silicon could be a photonics game-changer

Silicon is an outstanding candidate for developing new types of devices for controling multiple light beams, according to new research from the University of Surrey, suggesting new possibilities for the production of lasers and displays.

The researchers found that silicon possesses the strongest nonlinearity for manipulating laser beams – for example, changing their colour. 

Ben Murdin, co-author of the study and Professor of Physics at the University of Surrey, said: "Our finding was lucky because we weren't looking for it. We were trying to understand how a very small number of phosphorus atoms in a silicon crystal could be used for making a quantum computer and how to use light beams to control quantum information stored in the phosphorus atoms.

"We were astonished to find that the phosphorus atoms were re-emitting light beams that were almost as bright as the very intense laser we were shining on them. We shelved the data for a couple of years while we thought about proving where the beams were coming from. It's a great example of the way science proceeds by accident, and also how pan-European teams can still work together very effectively."

The research is published in the journal Light: Science and Applications

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41377-021-00509-6

https://www.surrey.ac.uk/news/study-suggests-silicon-could-be-photonics-game-changer

Monday, April 26, 2021

Stanford develops device for fine tuning the frequencies of individual photons

Researchers at Stanford University have developed a new photonic architecture capable of fine-tuning the frequencies of each individual photon in a stream of light. Potential applications could include optical neural networks.

"The structure consists of a low-loss wire for light (the black line below) carrying a stream of photons that pass by like so many cars on a busy throughway. The photons then enter a series of rings (orange), like the off-ramps in a highway cloverleaf. Each ring has a modulator (EOM in green) that transforms the frequency of the passing photons – frequencies which our eyes see as color. There can be as many rings as necessary, and engineers can finely control the modulators to dial in the desired frequency transformation."


The research, which is led by Shanhui Fan, a professor of electrical engineering at Stanford, is published this month in Nature Communications.

https://news.stanford.edu/2021/04/23/fine-tuning-color-light/

Sunday, April 25, 2021

EFFECT Photonics raises $43 million for system-on-chip

EFFECT Photonics, a leading developer of DWDM components based on its optical System-on-Chip technology, announced $43 million in Series-C funding.

EFFECT Photonics, which is a spin-off from the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, has developed a photonic chip in which light signals can be generated, modulated, filtered, and detected. 

The first close of the investment round, was co-led by Smile Invest together with existing investor Innovation Industries Fund, exactly one year after announcing the tape-out of its Manta full photonic integration coherent PIC. Smile Invest are joined by existing investors including Innovation Industries Fund, Photon Delta, btov Partners, Brabant Development Agency (BOM) and individual investors. This new round of funding will be used to further expand the current product line of optical transceivers for among other things 5G networks, and to scale up production capacity. In addition, the R&D activities for the next generation of optical chips, with capacity of more than 400 gigabits per second, will also be ramped up.

Boudewijn Docter, one of the founders and President of EFFECT Photonics: “As a company, we have come a long way to make the photonics technology market-ready. We are pleased that Invest-NL is joining our other investors in helping us scale up our production and enabling us to bring additional products to market quicker”.

Ruud Zandvliet, Senior Investment Manager at Invest-NL: “The Netherlands has a unique ecosystem for photonics technologies. EFFECT Photonics is a leading player in this field, capable of developing complex, fully integrated photonic chips. This offers the company the opportunity be a leading player as a manufacturer of the next generation of transceivers. By joining this investment round, Invest-NL contributes to the availability of financing for upscaling and future R&D investments. This is a good example of the role Invest-NL plays in increasing the strength of scale-ups and is in line with our objective of making the Netherlands more sustainable and innovative.

https://effectphotonics.com/


Wednesday, February 3, 2021

Ireland's Tyndall National Institute opens wireless laboratory in Dublin

Ireland's Tyndall National Institute has opened a wireless communications laboratory in Dublin to research future deep technologies: Future RF, Future Access, Future Protocols, Future AI, and Future Quantum. The new facility, which is the first for Tyndall outside of Cork, will see the creation of 50 new research jobs by 2025.

The announcement comes one year on from the launch of the ambitious Tyndall 2025 plan, which aims to double the size and impact of the national ICT research institute.

The Wireless Communications Research Laboratory will be headed up by industry thought leader and acclaimed scientist Dr Holger Claussen, along with Dr Lester Ho and Dr Senad Bulja. All three are former researchers with the prestigious multi award-winning Nokia Bell Labs Ireland, where they created the foundations for many of Nokia’s next generation products and pioneered Small Cell Networks, now a $6.7bn/a market.

The team will initially be based at CONNECT – the world leading Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Future Networks and Communications, hosted at Trinity College Dublin. The CONNECT Centre includes Ireland’s top telecommunications researchers in ten higher education institutes around Ireland, including University College Cork.

CEO of Tyndall National Institute, Professor William Scanlon, whose own research and academic background is in the area of wireless communications, welcomed the recruitment of this world-class research team. 

“Building on such high calibre international talent will ensure that Ireland becomes a leader in the future of communications innovation. Dr Claussen and his team will be instrumental in developing ground-breaking wireless technologies and will allow Ireland to take the lead in solving the fundamental problems in wireless communications across many domains such as industry 4.0 machine-communications, virtual and augmented reality, and mobile broadband. This new location and team will help us realise our Tyndall 2025 strategy for research excellence and ambitious growth.”

Commenting, Head of the newly formed Wireless Communications Laboratory Dr Holger Claussen said, “My team and I are excited to continue with our innovative work in shaping the future of wireless networks to enable exponential growth in mobile data traffic and reliable low latency communications on behalf of Tyndall and Ireland”.

https://www.tyndall.ie/news/tyndall-national-institute-expands-with-new-wireless-communications-laboratory-in-dublin/

Sunday, November 15, 2020

NTT researchers streamline quantum calculations with ZX-Calculus

Researchers at NTT are pursuing a novel method to reduce the resources associated with large-scale fault-tolerant quantum circuits by employing ZX-calculus.

Currently, a fault-tolerant quantum circuit for a given computation requires a huge amount of resources, both in terms of qubits and computational time. The researchers at NTT have found an efficient method to compress such circuits with the purpose of decreasing their hardware demands. They use ZX-Calculus as an intermediate language to reduce both the number of qubits and time required to perform such computation in many different circuits. 

A paper on the topic discusses an improvement of a 40% compression rate with respect to previous reductions, yielding compression rates higher than 70% compared to the initial circuit. The methodology proposed in this work promises to open new venues of research in large-scale quantum computing and bring quantum computation closer to reality by relaxing its hardware demands.

https://www.ntt.co.jp/news2020/2011e/201112a.html


Thursday, November 12, 2020

UK researchers develop all-silicon optical transmitter at 100Gbps

Researchers from the University of Southampton's Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) have demonstrated the first all-silicon optical transmitter at 100Gbps and beyond without the use of digital signal processing.

The new research was advanced within Southampton’s Silicon Photonics Group as part of the £6 million Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Programme Grant Silicon Photonics for Future Systems. The research team, led by Professor Graham Reed within the Zepler Institute for Photonics and Nanoelectronics, have published their findings in the Optical Society's prestigious journal Optica. 

The silicon modulator was fabricated through Southampton's CORNERSTONE research fabrication foundry service, and integrated with bespoke modulator drivers that are designed in-house and fabricated at the TSMC electronics foundry in Taiwan. Fabrication and integration work is carried out at the University of Southampton's Mountbatten cleanroom complex.

Professor Reed, Deputy Director of the ORC, says: "Our results are based upon a fully integrated electronic-photonic system, not a laboratory probed stand-alone silicon modulator. In all other work to date that does not rely on digital signal processing to recover signal integrity, integration of the electronics and photonics has resulted in an inferior system performance as compared to the performance of the individual components, resulting in a maximum data rate of approximately 56Gbps.

https://zepler.soton.ac.uk/news/6835

Sunday, October 18, 2020

NTT reports quantum transport phenomena in thin film

 Researchers at NTT in Japan, in collaboration with the Tanaka Research Group at The University of Tokyo, reported the first observation of a quantum transport phenomena occuring in a thin film substance.

The material exhibited an an exotic state called “magnetic Wey semimetal".  The researchers also revealed the existence of the exotic state in SrRuO3 by theoretical calculation as well, which was carried out in collaboration with the Das Research Group at the Tokyo Institute of Technology .

NTT said the results provide robust evidence for the existence of the magnetic Weyl semimetal state in materials as well as insight into the quantum transport properties in such an exotic state and their emerging mechanisms. The research could lead to innovative oxide materials and novel quantum devices in the future.

This research was reported in Nature Communications on October 9, 2020.


https://www.ntt.co.jp/news2020/2010e/201009a.html




Sunday, September 27, 2020

NYU: Colloids in a diamond lattice offer potential for photonic circuits

Researchers at NYU have devised a new process for the reliable self-assembly of colloids in a diamond formation. The technique potentially could be used to develop highly efficient optical circuits for use in optical computing. Other potential applications include more reliable and cheaper light filters.

The research, which was led by David Pine, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering and professor of physics at NYU, was detailed in an article appearing in the September 24 issue of Nature.

The technique involves the use of DNA to connect colloids in a diamond formation that results in a band gap for visible light.

“Dr. Pine’s long-sought demonstration of the first self-assembled colloidal diamond lattices will unlock new research and development opportunities for important Department of Defense technologies which could benefit from 3D photonic crystals,” said Dr. Evan Runnerstrom, program manager, Army Research Office (ARO), an element of the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory.

https://www.nyu.edu/about/news-publications/news/2020/september/researchers-develop-method-to-create-colloidal-diamonds.html




Sunday, August 9, 2020

California Research and Education Network upgrades to 400G

The California Research and Education Network (CalREN) is now able to provide high-capacity services, from 100G to 400G and beyond, on its coastal path between Los Angeles and Sunnyvale. The 460-mile upgraded optical route includes nodes in Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Soledad.

The upgrades leverages flex-grid spectrum Reconfigurable Optical Add-Drop Multiplexers (ROADMs). Flex grid optimizes the amount of spectrum used per wavelength, enabling more data capacity to be provisioned over fiber spans.

CalREN, which is operated by CENIC, serves the vast majority of K-20 students, educators, researchers, and individuals at other vital public-serving institutions. CalREN operates over 8,000 miles of fiber optic cable and serves more than 20 million users.

In 2019, CENIC upgraded the southern path of its network between Los Angeles and Riverside, including nodes in Tustin, Oceanside, San Diego, Escondido, and Sun City. Work will start in the fall on upgrades to the final inland path, which completes the network ring from Sunnyvale back to Los Angeles and includes nodes in Oakland, Sacramento, Fergus, Fresno, and Bakersfield.

“Next-generation infrastructure ensures CENIC can easily meet today’s networking demands while remaining flexible to meet the needs of tomorrow,” said CENIC President and CEO Louis Fox. “These upgrades provide CENIC’s members a more robust and efficient network on which to conduct data-intensive research, support teaching and learning, provide cutting-edge medical care, and enhance community engagement.”

CENIC is also supporting the Pacific Research Platform (PRP), a partnership of more than 50 institutions, led by researchers at UC San Diego and UC Berkeley, with support from the National Science Foundation. PRP builds on the optical backbone of Pacific Wave, a project of CENIC and Pacific Northwest Gigapop, to create a high-speed freeway for large scientific data sets by connecting campus networks and supercomputing centers on a regional scale, with Science DMZs at each site.

Developed by the US Department of Energy’s Energy Science Network (ESnet) engineers, the Science DMZ model addresses common network performance bottlenecks encountered at research institutions by creating an environment that is tailored to the needs of high-performance science applications, including high-volume bulk data transfer, remote experiment control, and data visualization. PRP’s design supports university researcher data analysis for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the NSF’s South Pole Neutrino Detector (IceCube), and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

CENIC deploys first 400G circuit in Los Angeles

CENIC, the organization that provides global connectivity for education and research institutions in California, has deployed a 400 Gbps single-carrier optical circuit between Los Angeles and Riverside. This marks one of the first-ever 400G superchannels to be deployed by a US regional research and education network. Construction included upgrading nodes in Los Angeles, Tustin, Oceanside, San Diego (home to the San Diego Supercomputer Center), Escondido, Sun City, and Riverside to 400G capabilities.

CENIC upgraded network infrastructure to flex spectrum Reconfigurable Optical Add-Drop Multiplexers (ROADMs) and the NCS 1004 transponder platform. CENIC used Cisco-loaned equipment for the validation in production and is now implementing the permanent infrastructure.

“This is an important networking milestone for CENIC,” said President and CEO Louis Fox. “With increasing demands for 100G services among our community, from research scientists working with big data sets to educators leveraging technology to transform the classroom, network capacity should not limit the work or ambitions of our researchers, teachers, or students.”

CENIC plans to expand its 400G provisioning capabilities along its coastal fiber path from Los Angeles to Sunnyvale by mid-2020.

CENIC’s network traffic continues to grow by roughly 60% each year. Between May 2018 and May 2019, the network moved an exabyte of data.

http://www.cenic.org

Sunday, August 2, 2020

MIT advances quantum information sharing between processors

Researchers at MIT are developing an on-off system that leverages "giant atoms" to enable high-fidelity operations and interconnection between processors.

A key challenge in quantum computing has been to communicate quantum information between distant parts of a processor.

In a paper published in the journal Nature, the MIT researchers constructed “giant artificial atoms” from superconducting quantum bits, or qubits, connected in a tunable configuration to a microwave transmission line, or waveguide.

“Coupling a qubit to a waveguide is usually quite bad for qubit operations, since doing so can significantly reduce the lifetime of the qubit,” says Bharath Kannan, MIT graduate fellow and first author of the paper. “However, the waveguide is necessary in order to release and route quantum information throughout the processor. Here, we’ve shown that it’s possible to preserve the coherence of the qubit even though it’s strongly coupled to a waveguide. We then have the ability to determine when we want to release the information stored in the qubit. We have shown how giant atoms can be used to turn the interaction with the waveguide on and off.”

http://news.mit.edu/2020/giant-atoms-quantum-processing-communication-0729

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

SPIE and University of Glasgow announce quantum photonics program

SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, and the University of Glasgow announced the establishment of the SPIE Early Career Researcher Accelerator Fund in Quantum Photonics.

A $500,000 gift from the SPIE Endowment Matching Program will be matched 100% by the University. The program will support a diverse group of graduate students working in the field of quantum photonics and will be managed by Professor Daniele Faccio, Royal Academy of Engineering Chair in Emerging Technologies, and Kelvin Chair of Natural Philosophy Professor Miles Padgett.

The fund will create two new programs at the University: an annual SPIE Early Career Researcher in Quantum Photonics Scholarship will be awarded to an outstanding University of Glasgow graduate student who is in the process of completing their studies. In addition, the SPIE Global Early Career Research program will support outgoing and incoming placements at and from the University as part of its ongoing collaboration with leading quantum-photonics research groups across the globe. Each year, the program will pair several University early-career researchers with counterparts from outside laboratories for six-month-long shared projects.

“We are delighted to be participating in these exciting endeavors with the University of Glasgow,” said SPIE President John Greivenkamp. “The interactive placements will offer transformative opportunities the university’s academic and industry-based researchers, and, together with the annual scholarship, will develop well-prepared, knowledgeable early-career researchers who will drive the future of the quantum industry.”

“We’re pleased and proud to be establishing the Early Career Researcher Accelerator Fund in Quantum Photonics thanks to SPIE’s generous gift, which we’re very happy to match with our own funding,” said Professor Sir Anton Muscatelli, principal and vice-chancellor of the University of Glasgow:. “The University’s quantum photonics expertise is world-leading, and our researchers have found ways to see through walls, capture images at a trillion frames per second, and take the very first pictures of quantum entanglement in action. This additional funding will help the University train a new generation of graduate students to make valuable contributions to academia and industry and inspire them to make their own amazing research breakthroughs.”

https://www.spie.org/news/spie-and-university-of-glasgow-announce-one-million-dollar-quantum-photonics-program-

Thursday, July 23, 2020

Blueprint for the Quantum Internet

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) outlined a blueprint strategy for the development of a national Quantum Internet.

The DoE's 17 national laboratories will serve as the first nodes on the Quantum Internet. Also participating will be the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, the National Institute for Standards and Technology, the National Security Agency, and NASA. The academic community and industry will also be invited.

At a launch event hosted by the University of Chicago, officals described the initiative as "bringing the United States to the forefront of the global quantum race and ushering in a new era of communications."

“The Department of Energy is proud to play an instrumental role in the development of the national quantum internet,” said U.S. Secretary of Energy Dan Brouillette. “By constructing this new and emerging technology, the United States continues with its commitment to maintain and expand our quantum capabilities.”

In February, scientists from DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Illinois, and the University of Chicago entangled photons across a 52-mile “quantum loop” in the Chicago suburbs, successfully establishing one of the longest land-based quantum networks in the nation. That network will soon be connected to DOE’s Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, establishing a three-node, 80-mile testbed.

“The combined intellectual and technological leadership of the University of Chicago, Argonne, and Fermilab has given Chicago a central role in the global competition to develop quantum information technologies,” said Robert J. Zimmer, president of the University of Chicago. “This work entails defining and building entirely new fields of study, and with them, new frontiers for technological applications that can improve the quality of life for many around the world and support the long-term competitiveness of our city, state, and nation.”

 “Argonne, Fermilab, and the University of Chicago have a long history of working together to accelerate technology that drives U.S. prosperity and security,” said Argonne Director Paul Kearns. “We continue that tradition by tackling the challenges of establishing a national quantum internet, expanding our collaboration to tap into the vast power of American scientists and engineers around the country.”

Video of the event
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cR0wVCs9DxI

Technical report: From Long-distance Entanglement to Building a Nationwide Quantum Internet
https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1638794/

Sunday, July 12, 2020

MIT's “Light squeezer” reduces quantum noise in lasers

Researchers at MIT have developed a quantum “light squeezer” that reduces quantum noise in an incoming laser beam by 15%.

The portable light squeezer works at room temperature and could be used to improve laser measurements where quantum noise is a limiting factor. The setup is based on a marble-sized optical cavity, housed in a vacuum chamber and containing two mirrors, the first of which is smaller than the diameter of a human hair. The second, larger, nanomechanical mirror, which suspended by a spring-like cantileve, is the key to the system’s ability to work at room temperature.

“The importance of the result is that you can engineer these mechanical systems so that at room temperature, they still can have quantum mechanical properties,” says Nergis Mavalvala, the Marble Professor and associate head of physics at MIT. “That changes the game completely in terms of being able to use these systems, not just in our own labs, housed in large cryogenic refrigerators, but out in the world.”

http://news.mit.edu/2020/quantum-noise-laser-precision-wave-detection-0707

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

MIT: Scaling up the quantum chip

Researchers at MIT have achieved a breakthrough in the field of scalable quantum processors by developing a process to manufacture and integrate “artificial atoms,” created by atomic-scale defects in microscopically thin slices of diamond, with photonic circuitry.

A team, led by Dirk Englund, an associate professor in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, were able to build a 128-qubit system — the largest integrated artificial atom-photonics chip to date. The hybrid manufacturing approach iused carefully selected “quantum micro chiplets” containing multiple diamond-based qubits placed on an aluminum nitride photonic integrated circuit.

“In the past 20 years of quantum engineering, it has been the ultimate vision to manufacture such artificial qubit systems at volumes comparable to integrated electronics,” Englund says. “Although there has been remarkable progress in this very active area of research, fabrication and materials complications have thus far yielded just two to three emitters per photonic system.”

http://news.mit.edu/2020/scaling-quantum-chip-0708

Monday, May 25, 2020

Australian researchers achieve 44.2 Tbps from a single light source.

Researchers from Monash, Swinburne and RMIT universities in Australia have tested a single light source delivering 44.2 Tbps. The research, which is published in the journal Nature Communications, tested a device that replaces 80 lasers with one single piece of equipment known as a micro-comb.

The ultra-high data transmission occurred over 75 km of standard optical fibre using the single integrated chip source over the C-band at 1550 nm with a spectral efficiency of 10.4 bits s−1 Hz−1. Micro-comb spacing of 48.9 GHz enabled the use of 64 QAM - quadrature amplitude modulated.

Professor Moss, Director of the Optical Sciences Centre at Swinburne, says: “In the 10 years since I co-invented micro-comb chips, they have become an enormously important field of research. “It is truly exciting to see their capability in ultra-high bandwidth fibre optic telecommunications coming to fruition. This work represents a world-record for bandwidth down a single optical fibre from a single chip source, and represents an enormous breakthrough for part of the network which does the heaviest lifting. Micro-combs offer enormous promise for us to meet the world’s insatiable demand for bandwidth.”

https://www.swinburne.edu.au/news/latest-news/2020/05/australian-researchers-record-worlds-fastest-internet-speed-from-a-single-optical-chip.php

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Finland's IT Center for Science tests 400G with ADVA FSP 3000 TeraFlex

CSC – IT Center for Science, which operates the Finnish University and Research Network (FUNET), has transported 400 Gbps over its existing long-haul network using the ADVA FSP 3000 TeraFlex.

The trials pave the way for ultra-fast access to Finland’s supercomputers and could offer a major boost to Europe’s research and education community.

ADVA's FSP 3000 TeraFlex enables channels of up to 1200 Gbps for 3x 400GbE services and a total capacity of 3.6 Tbps. Using network telemetry, software-defined fractional QAM modulation and adaptive baud rate capabilities, the solution is able to ensure maximum spectral efficiency at every point in the network. This enables operators to leverage previously unused optical spectrum so that deployed infrastructure can be made to transport far more data. As well as succeeding with 600 Gbps transport over 278km and with 400 Gbps over 2,844km, the trials showed the power of harnessing granular increments with speeds of 300 Gbps over 4,681km.

“These trials demonstrate how the ADVA FSP 3000 TeraFlex™ performs over long-haul distances, and the results were well above our expectations. It was the first time when we really needed a gridless line system to enable a full choice of line speeds and modulations. The powerful performance of TeraFlex™ and its flexibility to tune line speed and modulation, will allow us to optimize spectrum usage and minimize the cost of providing services to our users,” said Jani Myyry, FUNET network, CSC – IT Center for Science. “Our network provides essential connectivity for research and education institutes in Finland and throughout the Nordics. Initially we were aiming for transport based on 100Gbit/s and 200Gbit/s but are now seeing an increasing need for speeds above that, up to use cases requiring a bandwidth of multiple Tbit/s. TeraFlex and our ADVA open line system infrastructure enable us to efficiently scale our network with line speeds of 400Gbit/s and above. The trials show how TeraFlex™ dramatically increases flexibility and efficiency for 100GbE and 400GbE transport over long-haul distances.”

https://www.adva.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/20200505-funet-trials-adva-fsp-3000-teraflex-to-dramatically-expand-network-capacity

Sunday, May 3, 2020

Stanford's Andrea Goldsmith becomes first woman to win Marconi Prize

Dr. Andrea Goldsmith, a professor of electrical engineering at Stanford, has been awarded the 2020 Marconi Prize for her pioneering contributions to the theory and practice of adaptive wireless communications. She is the first woman to win the flagship award of the Marconi Society, a global foundation dedicated to continuing the legacy of Guglielmo Marconi, the inventor of radio.

Goldsmith co‐founded and served as Chief Technical Officer and Board Member of Plume WiFi and of Quantenna Communications, and she currently serves on the Board of Directors for Medtronic and Crown Castle). She has also been affiliated with the technical advisory boards of Quantenna, Sequans, Interdigital, and Cohere. Goldsmith has launched and led several multi‐university research projects including DARPA’s ITMANET program, and she is currently the lead Stanford Principal Investigator in the NSF Center on the Science of Information. In addition, she has held industry positions at Maxim Technologies, Memorylink Corporation, and AT&T Bell Laboratories.

Goldsmith is donating her $100,000 award to the Marconi Society to start an endowment to fund technology and diversity initiatives.

“I am so deeply honored and humbled to become a Marconi Fellow,” said Goldsmith, who is the Stephen Harris Professor in the School of Engineering. “The honor is particularly meaningful to me at this moment in time, when our information and communications technologies are enabling our universities, companies and the entire social ecosystem to function in a suddenly all-online world, as well as calling attention to the critical importance of digital inclusion.”

The award was announced April 30 by Vint Cerf, a former Stanford professor who helped lay the foundations for the internet. Cerf became a Marconi Fellow in 1998 and serves as the organization’s chairman.

“Andrea has enabled billions of consumers around the world to enjoy fast and reliable wireless service, as well as applications such as video streaming and autonomous vehicles that require stable network performance,” Cerf said. He added, “Andrea’s personal work and that of the many engineers whom she has mentored have had a global impact on wireless networking.”


https://news.stanford.edu/2020/04/30/andrea-goldsmith-first-woman-win-marconi-prize/

Thursday, April 9, 2020

Intel and Georgia Tech to lead DARPA project

Intel and the Georgia Institute of Technology have been selected to lead a Guaranteeing Artificial Intelligence (AI) Robustness against Deception (GARD) program team for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

The goal of the GARD program is to establish theoretical ML system foundations that will not only identify system vulnerabilities and characterize properties to enhance system robustness, but also promote the creation of effective defenses. Through these program elements, GARD aims to create deception-resistant ML technologies with stringent criteria for evaluating their effectiveness.

The first phase of GARD will focus on enhancing object detection technologies through spatial, temporal and semantic coherence for both still images and videos.

Intel is the prime contractor in this four-year, multimillion-dollar joint effort to improve cybersecurity defenses against deception attacks on machine learning (ML) models.

“Intel and Georgia Tech are working together to advance the ecosystem’s collective understanding of and ability to mitigate against AI and ML vulnerabilities. Through innovative research in coherence techniques, we are collaborating on an approach to enhance object detection and to improve the ability for AI and ML to respond to adversarial attacks,” states Jason Martin, principal engineer at Intel Labs and principal investigator for the DARPA GARD program from Intel.