Showing posts with label Academia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Academia. Show all posts

Sunday, August 2, 2020

MIT advances quantum information sharing between processors

Researchers at MIT are developing an on-off system that leverages "giant atoms" to enable high-fidelity operations and interconnection between processors.

A key challenge in quantum computing has been to communicate quantum information between distant parts of a processor.

In a paper published in the journal Nature, the MIT researchers constructed “giant artificial atoms” from superconducting quantum bits, or qubits, connected in a tunable configuration to a microwave transmission line, or waveguide.

“Coupling a qubit to a waveguide is usually quite bad for qubit operations, since doing so can significantly reduce the lifetime of the qubit,” says Bharath Kannan, MIT graduate fellow and first author of the paper. “However, the waveguide is necessary in order to release and route quantum information throughout the processor. Here, we’ve shown that it’s possible to preserve the coherence of the qubit even though it’s strongly coupled to a waveguide. We then have the ability to determine when we want to release the information stored in the qubit. We have shown how giant atoms can be used to turn the interaction with the waveguide on and off.”

http://news.mit.edu/2020/giant-atoms-quantum-processing-communication-0729

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

SPIE and University of Glasgow announce quantum photonics program

SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, and the University of Glasgow announced the establishment of the SPIE Early Career Researcher Accelerator Fund in Quantum Photonics.

A $500,000 gift from the SPIE Endowment Matching Program will be matched 100% by the University. The program will support a diverse group of graduate students working in the field of quantum photonics and will be managed by Professor Daniele Faccio, Royal Academy of Engineering Chair in Emerging Technologies, and Kelvin Chair of Natural Philosophy Professor Miles Padgett.

The fund will create two new programs at the University: an annual SPIE Early Career Researcher in Quantum Photonics Scholarship will be awarded to an outstanding University of Glasgow graduate student who is in the process of completing their studies. In addition, the SPIE Global Early Career Research program will support outgoing and incoming placements at and from the University as part of its ongoing collaboration with leading quantum-photonics research groups across the globe. Each year, the program will pair several University early-career researchers with counterparts from outside laboratories for six-month-long shared projects.

“We are delighted to be participating in these exciting endeavors with the University of Glasgow,” said SPIE President John Greivenkamp. “The interactive placements will offer transformative opportunities the university’s academic and industry-based researchers, and, together with the annual scholarship, will develop well-prepared, knowledgeable early-career researchers who will drive the future of the quantum industry.”

“We’re pleased and proud to be establishing the Early Career Researcher Accelerator Fund in Quantum Photonics thanks to SPIE’s generous gift, which we’re very happy to match with our own funding,” said Professor Sir Anton Muscatelli, principal and vice-chancellor of the University of Glasgow:. “The University’s quantum photonics expertise is world-leading, and our researchers have found ways to see through walls, capture images at a trillion frames per second, and take the very first pictures of quantum entanglement in action. This additional funding will help the University train a new generation of graduate students to make valuable contributions to academia and industry and inspire them to make their own amazing research breakthroughs.”

https://www.spie.org/news/spie-and-university-of-glasgow-announce-one-million-dollar-quantum-photonics-program-

Thursday, July 23, 2020

Blueprint for the Quantum Internet

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) outlined a blueprint strategy for the development of a national Quantum Internet.

The DoE's 17 national laboratories will serve as the first nodes on the Quantum Internet. Also participating will be the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, the National Institute for Standards and Technology, the National Security Agency, and NASA. The academic community and industry will also be invited.

At a launch event hosted by the University of Chicago, officals described the initiative as "bringing the United States to the forefront of the global quantum race and ushering in a new era of communications."

“The Department of Energy is proud to play an instrumental role in the development of the national quantum internet,” said U.S. Secretary of Energy Dan Brouillette. “By constructing this new and emerging technology, the United States continues with its commitment to maintain and expand our quantum capabilities.”

In February, scientists from DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Illinois, and the University of Chicago entangled photons across a 52-mile “quantum loop” in the Chicago suburbs, successfully establishing one of the longest land-based quantum networks in the nation. That network will soon be connected to DOE’s Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois, establishing a three-node, 80-mile testbed.

“The combined intellectual and technological leadership of the University of Chicago, Argonne, and Fermilab has given Chicago a central role in the global competition to develop quantum information technologies,” said Robert J. Zimmer, president of the University of Chicago. “This work entails defining and building entirely new fields of study, and with them, new frontiers for technological applications that can improve the quality of life for many around the world and support the long-term competitiveness of our city, state, and nation.”

 “Argonne, Fermilab, and the University of Chicago have a long history of working together to accelerate technology that drives U.S. prosperity and security,” said Argonne Director Paul Kearns. “We continue that tradition by tackling the challenges of establishing a national quantum internet, expanding our collaboration to tap into the vast power of American scientists and engineers around the country.”

Video of the event
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cR0wVCs9DxI

Technical report: From Long-distance Entanglement to Building a Nationwide Quantum Internet
https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1638794/

Sunday, July 12, 2020

MIT's “Light squeezer” reduces quantum noise in lasers

Researchers at MIT have developed a quantum “light squeezer” that reduces quantum noise in an incoming laser beam by 15%.

The portable light squeezer works at room temperature and could be used to improve laser measurements where quantum noise is a limiting factor. The setup is based on a marble-sized optical cavity, housed in a vacuum chamber and containing two mirrors, the first of which is smaller than the diameter of a human hair. The second, larger, nanomechanical mirror, which suspended by a spring-like cantileve, is the key to the system’s ability to work at room temperature.

“The importance of the result is that you can engineer these mechanical systems so that at room temperature, they still can have quantum mechanical properties,” says Nergis Mavalvala, the Marble Professor and associate head of physics at MIT. “That changes the game completely in terms of being able to use these systems, not just in our own labs, housed in large cryogenic refrigerators, but out in the world.”

http://news.mit.edu/2020/quantum-noise-laser-precision-wave-detection-0707

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

MIT: Scaling up the quantum chip

Researchers at MIT have achieved a breakthrough in the field of scalable quantum processors by developing a process to manufacture and integrate “artificial atoms,” created by atomic-scale defects in microscopically thin slices of diamond, with photonic circuitry.

A team, led by Dirk Englund, an associate professor in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, were able to build a 128-qubit system — the largest integrated artificial atom-photonics chip to date. The hybrid manufacturing approach iused carefully selected “quantum micro chiplets” containing multiple diamond-based qubits placed on an aluminum nitride photonic integrated circuit.

“In the past 20 years of quantum engineering, it has been the ultimate vision to manufacture such artificial qubit systems at volumes comparable to integrated electronics,” Englund says. “Although there has been remarkable progress in this very active area of research, fabrication and materials complications have thus far yielded just two to three emitters per photonic system.”

http://news.mit.edu/2020/scaling-quantum-chip-0708

Monday, May 25, 2020

Australian researchers achieve 44.2 Tbps from a single light source.

Researchers from Monash, Swinburne and RMIT universities in Australia have tested a single light source delivering 44.2 Tbps. The research, which is published in the journal Nature Communications, tested a device that replaces 80 lasers with one single piece of equipment known as a micro-comb.

The ultra-high data transmission occurred over 75 km of standard optical fibre using the single integrated chip source over the C-band at 1550 nm with a spectral efficiency of 10.4 bits s−1 Hz−1. Micro-comb spacing of 48.9 GHz enabled the use of 64 QAM - quadrature amplitude modulated.

Professor Moss, Director of the Optical Sciences Centre at Swinburne, says: “In the 10 years since I co-invented micro-comb chips, they have become an enormously important field of research. “It is truly exciting to see their capability in ultra-high bandwidth fibre optic telecommunications coming to fruition. This work represents a world-record for bandwidth down a single optical fibre from a single chip source, and represents an enormous breakthrough for part of the network which does the heaviest lifting. Micro-combs offer enormous promise for us to meet the world’s insatiable demand for bandwidth.”

https://www.swinburne.edu.au/news/latest-news/2020/05/australian-researchers-record-worlds-fastest-internet-speed-from-a-single-optical-chip.php

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Finland's IT Center for Science tests 400G with ADVA FSP 3000 TeraFlex

CSC – IT Center for Science, which operates the Finnish University and Research Network (FUNET), has transported 400 Gbps over its existing long-haul network using the ADVA FSP 3000 TeraFlex.

The trials pave the way for ultra-fast access to Finland’s supercomputers and could offer a major boost to Europe’s research and education community.

ADVA's FSP 3000 TeraFlex enables channels of up to 1200 Gbps for 3x 400GbE services and a total capacity of 3.6 Tbps. Using network telemetry, software-defined fractional QAM modulation and adaptive baud rate capabilities, the solution is able to ensure maximum spectral efficiency at every point in the network. This enables operators to leverage previously unused optical spectrum so that deployed infrastructure can be made to transport far more data. As well as succeeding with 600 Gbps transport over 278km and with 400 Gbps over 2,844km, the trials showed the power of harnessing granular increments with speeds of 300 Gbps over 4,681km.

“These trials demonstrate how the ADVA FSP 3000 TeraFlex™ performs over long-haul distances, and the results were well above our expectations. It was the first time when we really needed a gridless line system to enable a full choice of line speeds and modulations. The powerful performance of TeraFlex™ and its flexibility to tune line speed and modulation, will allow us to optimize spectrum usage and minimize the cost of providing services to our users,” said Jani Myyry, FUNET network, CSC – IT Center for Science. “Our network provides essential connectivity for research and education institutes in Finland and throughout the Nordics. Initially we were aiming for transport based on 100Gbit/s and 200Gbit/s but are now seeing an increasing need for speeds above that, up to use cases requiring a bandwidth of multiple Tbit/s. TeraFlex and our ADVA open line system infrastructure enable us to efficiently scale our network with line speeds of 400Gbit/s and above. The trials show how TeraFlex™ dramatically increases flexibility and efficiency for 100GbE and 400GbE transport over long-haul distances.”

https://www.adva.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/20200505-funet-trials-adva-fsp-3000-teraflex-to-dramatically-expand-network-capacity

Sunday, May 3, 2020

Stanford's Andrea Goldsmith becomes first woman to win Marconi Prize

Dr. Andrea Goldsmith, a professor of electrical engineering at Stanford, has been awarded the 2020 Marconi Prize for her pioneering contributions to the theory and practice of adaptive wireless communications. She is the first woman to win the flagship award of the Marconi Society, a global foundation dedicated to continuing the legacy of Guglielmo Marconi, the inventor of radio.

Goldsmith co‐founded and served as Chief Technical Officer and Board Member of Plume WiFi and of Quantenna Communications, and she currently serves on the Board of Directors for Medtronic and Crown Castle). She has also been affiliated with the technical advisory boards of Quantenna, Sequans, Interdigital, and Cohere. Goldsmith has launched and led several multi‐university research projects including DARPA’s ITMANET program, and she is currently the lead Stanford Principal Investigator in the NSF Center on the Science of Information. In addition, she has held industry positions at Maxim Technologies, Memorylink Corporation, and AT&T Bell Laboratories.

Goldsmith is donating her $100,000 award to the Marconi Society to start an endowment to fund technology and diversity initiatives.

“I am so deeply honored and humbled to become a Marconi Fellow,” said Goldsmith, who is the Stephen Harris Professor in the School of Engineering. “The honor is particularly meaningful to me at this moment in time, when our information and communications technologies are enabling our universities, companies and the entire social ecosystem to function in a suddenly all-online world, as well as calling attention to the critical importance of digital inclusion.”

The award was announced April 30 by Vint Cerf, a former Stanford professor who helped lay the foundations for the internet. Cerf became a Marconi Fellow in 1998 and serves as the organization’s chairman.

“Andrea has enabled billions of consumers around the world to enjoy fast and reliable wireless service, as well as applications such as video streaming and autonomous vehicles that require stable network performance,” Cerf said. He added, “Andrea’s personal work and that of the many engineers whom she has mentored have had a global impact on wireless networking.”


https://news.stanford.edu/2020/04/30/andrea-goldsmith-first-woman-win-marconi-prize/

Thursday, April 9, 2020

Intel and Georgia Tech to lead DARPA project

Intel and the Georgia Institute of Technology have been selected to lead a Guaranteeing Artificial Intelligence (AI) Robustness against Deception (GARD) program team for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

The goal of the GARD program is to establish theoretical ML system foundations that will not only identify system vulnerabilities and characterize properties to enhance system robustness, but also promote the creation of effective defenses. Through these program elements, GARD aims to create deception-resistant ML technologies with stringent criteria for evaluating their effectiveness.

The first phase of GARD will focus on enhancing object detection technologies through spatial, temporal and semantic coherence for both still images and videos.

Intel is the prime contractor in this four-year, multimillion-dollar joint effort to improve cybersecurity defenses against deception attacks on machine learning (ML) models.

“Intel and Georgia Tech are working together to advance the ecosystem’s collective understanding of and ability to mitigate against AI and ML vulnerabilities. Through innovative research in coherence techniques, we are collaborating on an approach to enhance object detection and to improve the ability for AI and ML to respond to adversarial attacks,” states Jason Martin, principal engineer at Intel Labs and principal investigator for the DARPA GARD program from Intel.

Sunday, January 26, 2020

FLY-LION3 subsea cable to provide seismic monitoring

Orange and members of the FLY-LION3 consortium (Lower Indian Ocean Network) - the Société Réunionnaise du Radiotéléphone and Comores Câbles - will provide connectivity for the Mayotte volcano and earthquake monitoring network, which is administered by the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP).

Using a pair of optical fibres, IPG will experiment with a new technique to listen to the region’s seismic activity. The scientists involved hope to get a better understanding of major geological structures linked to current seismo-volcanic activity.

The FLY-LION3, which was commissioned on 10-October-2019, spans 400km in length connecting Moroni (Grande Comore) and Mamoudzou (Mayotte).

Seismic measurements (ground vibration) will be recorded along the FLY-LION3 cable from Kaweni for a distance of around 50 km in a south-easterly direction from Mayotte.

Whilst the use of optical fibre to monitor infrastructure has been common for around twenty years, with sensors located on portions of fibre, scientists are looking to exploit the different intrinsic backscatter of fibre as sensors to acquire information on its environment (temperature, pressure, stress, vibration, etc.). Optical fibres themselves can be used as a sensor, known as “Fibre Optic Sensors” (FOS).

http://www.ipgp.fr

FLY-LION3 subsea cable reaches Mayotte

The 400 km-long FLY-LION3 subsea cable has reached the island of Mayotte, an overseas department and region of France located in the Indian Ocean.

FLY-LION3 has landing stations in Kaweni (Mamoudzou) and Moroni. It will also link to existing cables LION2 and EASSy, offering a direct connection to the east coast of Africa.

Orange Marine, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Orange group, is responsible for laying the cable.

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

NTT Research partners with leading U.S. universities

NTT Research's Physics and Informatics (PHI) Lab has reached joint research agreements with six universities, one government agency, and one private company.

The PHI Lab, which is focused on a new computing paradigm created in the interdisciplinary field between quantum physics, neuroscience, and optical technology, has struck five-year agreements with California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Cornell University, University of Michigan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, Stanford University, Swinburne University of Technology, and quantum computing software company 1QBit.

“Having launched only four months ago, we are excited to have reached agreements with eight of the world’s top research organizations with interests and expertise in the three fields crucial to our mission: quantum-to-classical crossover physics, neural networks, and optical parametric oscillators,” said NTT Research PHI Lab Director Yamamoto. “Over the next five years, we believe our collaboration will uncover novel principles and technologies that advance information processing beyond the current state of the art.”

“These agreements reflect our belief that a new computing model requires teamwork, in the broadest and best sense of that word,” said Kazuhiro Gomi, President and CEO, NTT Research. “They also represent our respect for the talent and expertise of our primary investigator collaborators and the promise of their research teams.”

Summaries of the eight agreements follow:

  • Caltech – Primary goal: to develop a scalable architecture for efficient quantum simulation of many-body systems using optical parametric oscillator (OPO) networks. PI: Alireza Marandi, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics.
  • Cornell – Primary goal: to develop a quantum neural network (QNN) based on error detection and error correction feedback. PI: Peter McMahon, Assistant Professor of Applied and Engineering Physics.
  • Michigan – Primary goal: to perform theoretical studies of topological states in nonlinear optics and synthetic topological matter. PI: Franco Nori, Affiliated Faculty, Department of Physics.
  • MIT – Primary goal: to develop the photonic accelerators for deep learning and the superconducting coherent Ising machines (CIMs) for optimization. PIs: Dirk Englund, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; and Will Oliver, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Professor of the Practice of Physics.
  • NASA Ames Research Center – Primary goal: to perform benchmark studies of CIMs vs. modern heuristics on various optimization problems. PI: Eleanor Rieffel, Lead, Quantum Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.
  • Stanford – Primary goal: to develop novel optical and superconducting devices for studying the quantum-to-classical crossover physics and critical phenomena in the quantum neural network. PI: Hideo Mabuchi, Professor of Applied Physics; and co-PIs: Martin Fejer, Professor of Applied Physics; Benjamin Lev, Associate Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics; Surya Ganguli, Associate Professor of Applied Physics; and Amir Safavi-Naeini, Assistant Professor of Applied Physics.
  • Swinburne – Primary goal: to develop and implement the theoretical models for CIMs. PIs: Peter Drummond, Distinguished Professor and Science Director, Centre for Quantum and Optical Science (CQOS); and Margaret Reid, Professor of Physics, School of Science, CQOS, and Department of Physics and Astronomy.
  • 1QBit – Primary goal: to perform research in design and analysis of a stack of algorithms that bridge commercially viable applications to the forms of computation natively done by CIMs, with a multitude of applications in operations research and artificial intelligence. PI: Pooya Ronagh, Head of Hardware Innovation 


Innovative Optical and Wireless Network Forum launched by NTT


NTT, Intel and Sony are joining forces to create a new Innovative Optical and Wireless Network (IOWN) Global Forum, which aims to accelerate the adoption of new communications infrastructure. The goal is to will bring together an all-photonic network including silicon photonics, edge computing, and distributed connected computing, along with wireless access.. IOWN will develop new technologies, frameworks, specifications and reference designs, in...


Thursday, April 11, 2019

Penn State researchers develop new germanosilicate glass

Researchers at Penn State have developed a new composition of germanosilicate glass by adding zinc oxide has properties good for lens applications.

The researchers invented a new family of zinc germanosilicate glass that has a high refractive index comparable to that of pure germania glass. The samples also showed high transparency, good ultra-violet-shielding properties, and good glass forming ability, making them suitable for lens applications.

Germanosilicate glass is essential in the manufacture of optical amplifiers, waveguides, and solid-state lasers.

The researchers published their results in a recent issue of the Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids.

https://news.psu.edu/story/567138/2019/04/03/research/new-family-glass-good-lenses

Monday, February 18, 2019

Tokyo Tech's 28 GHz transceiver with dual-polarized MIMO hits 15 Gbps

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a 28 GHz transceiver that integrates beamforming with dual-polarized multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) technology.

Preliminary testing showed that the maximum data rate achieved was 15 Gbps using 64-QAM.

The transceiver measures just 3 mm by 4 mm and could help improve performances of 5G and Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

"Compared with the conventional switch-based bi-directional approach, our bi-directional amplifier completely shares the inter-stage matching networks between the transceiver and the receiver. Thus, the required on-chip area is further minimized," states Kenichi Okada at Tokyo Tech's Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Tokyo Tech develops atomic clock for small satellites

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ricoh co. and Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology have developed an ultra-low-power atomic clock (ULPAC) for small satellites.

The fully functional atomic clock consumes an order of magnitude less power than that of previously reported devices. It also excels in two other critical aspects: volume occupied and Allan deviation, which is a measure of the stability of the frequency of a clock.

https://www.titech.ac.jp/english/news/research/


Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Photonic memory research at Eindhoven University of Technology

Researchers of the Institute of Photonic Integration of the Eindhoven University of Technology are developing a hybrid memory that combines photonic properties and magnetic hard drives.

The idea is to use femtosecond light pulses to write data directly in a magnetic memory.

"The switching of the magnetization direction using the single-pulse all-optical switching is in the order of picoseconds, which is about a 100 to 1000 times faster than what is possible with today's technology. Moreover, as the optical information is stored in magnetic bits without the need of energy-costly electronics, it holds enormous potential for future use in photonic integrated circuits," states Mark Lalieu, Ph.D. candidate at the Applied Physics Department of TU/e.

https://www.tue.nl/en/news/news-overview/10-01-2019-next-generation-photonic-memory-devices-are-light-written-ultrafast-and-energy-efficient/



Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Researchers at Duke test photonic crystal waveguide

Researchers at Duke University have demonstrated a photonic crystal waveguide capable of directing photons of light around sharp corners with virtually no losses due to backscattering.

The photonic crystal waveguide was built on the concept of topological insulators. A research paper on the topic was published in the November 12 issue of Nature Nanotechnology and an overview is posted on the university's website.

The smaller the device the better, but of course we’re trying to minimize losses as well,” said Wiktor Walasik, a postdoctoral associate in electrical and computer engineering at Duke. “There are a lot of people working to make an all-optical computing system possible. We’re not there yet, but I think that’s the direction we’re going.”

https://pratt.duke.edu/about/news/optical-waveguide

Monday, September 24, 2018

ECOC 2018: Cambridge develops graphene-based tunable lasers

Dr. Andrea Ferrari, director of the Cambridge Graphene Centre, which is part of the University of Cambridge, presented research on wavelength tunable lasers in single-layer graphene.

The technology shows potential for use in on-chip optical switches.

https://www.graphene.cam.ac.uk/
https://www.graphene.cam.ac.uk/news/graphene-high-speed-communications


Sunday, August 5, 2018

MIT researchers develop silicon-based optical filter

Researchers from MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronic have designed an optical filter on a chip that can process optical signals from across an extremely wide spectrum of light at once.

“This new filter takes an extremely broad range of wavelengths within its bandwidth as input and efficiently separates it into two output signals, regardless of exactly how wide or at what wavelength the input is. That capability didn’t before in integrated optics,” says Emir Salih Magden, a former PhD student in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) and first author on a paper describing the filters published today in Nature Communications.

Potential applications include fiber-to-the-home installations.

http://news.mit.edu/2018/chip-optical-filter-processes-wide-range-light-wavelengths-0801

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Stanford researchers train neural network using optical chip

Researchers at Stanford University have demonstrated the ability to train artificial neural networks directly on an optical chip.

Neural network processing currently relies on conventional computers.  The Optical Society's journal for high impact research, Stanford University researchers report a method for training these networks directly in the device by implementing an optical analogue of the ‘backpropagation’ algorithm, which is the standard way to train conventional neural networks.

“Using an optical chip to perform neural network computations more efficiently than is possible with digital computers could allow more complex problems to be solved,” said research team leader Shanhui Fan of Stanford University. “This would enhance the capability of artificial neural networks to perform tasks required for self-driving cars or to formulate an appropriate response to a spoken question, for example. It could also improve our lives in ways we can’t imagine now.”

https://www.osapublishing.org/optica/abstract.cfm?uri=optica-5-7-864




Saturday, July 7, 2018

Ericsson opens 5G Lab at the Indian Institute of Technology (Delhi)

Ericsson has established a Centre of Excellence (CoE) and Innovation Lab for 5G at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi.

In addition, Ericsson conducted India’s first 5G over the air beam tracking demonstration on 3.5GHz spectrum using a pre-commercial end-to-end system including 5G-NR, VRAN and VCORE. The demonstration includes 3GPP 5G NR Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) antenna technology with adaptive beamforming and beam tracking techniques.

Speaking on the occasion, Shri Manoj Sinha, Minister of State for Communications (I/C) and Minister of State for Railways, said: “I would like to congratulate Ericsson for taking the lead in terms of setting up the first 5G Center of Excellence and Innovation Lab in the country. The 5G Center of Excellence supports the Government’s plans to foster a robust and vibrant 5G ecosystem in India. We want India to be an active participant in the design, development and manufacture of 5G-based technologies, products and apps.”

Prof. V. Ramgopal Rao, Director, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi stated, “We at IIT Delhi are committed to collaborating with industry and Government to develop technologies that enable connectivity for millions. We take pride in hosting the Ericsson Center of Excellence and Innovation Lab, thereby playing a pivotal role for the industry and academia to come together, test out new technologies and explore the full potential of 5G.”