Showing posts with label 400G. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 400G. Show all posts

Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Fujitsu expands family of 400G pluggable coherent transceivers

Fujitsu Optical Components Limited (FOC) released a 400G ZR+ transceiver that enables coherent WDM transmission greater than 120km in the same form factors (QSFP56-DD and OSFP) as its 400G ZR transceiver. 

FOC has started sample shipments of 400G ZR transceivers, expecting high volume commercial deployment of these 400G coherent products to begin in 2021.

The OpenZR+ MSA aims to expand the transmission distance by using higher performance OFEC (Open Forward Error Correction) from the OpenROADM standard, support multi-rate Ethernet, and enable the selection of the optimum transmission distance and capacity for user needs by supporting adjustable 100G, 200G, 300G, and 400G line side transport links. Separately, the Open ROADM MSA is moving forward with standardization focused on carrier applications and the specifications of flexible coherent pluggable transceivers that support additional specifications not in 400ZR, such as high optical output power, multi-rate, multiplexing function, and additional protocols such as OTN. 

FOC's 400G ZR+ transceiver is available in the same compact QSFP56 -DD and OSFP form factors as the 400ZR. In addition, the use of OFEC, which has higher performance than the CFEC used in 400ZR, allows for a longer transmission reach and ensures the desired interoperability. 

NTT Electronics and Acacia Communications have successfully completed module-level interoperability testing between DSPs in 400ZR and OpenZR+ operatiing modes,using modules supplied by FOC and Acacia. The line interface is configurable from 100GE to 400GE, enabling a wide range of transmission distances. The client interface supports 100GE to 400GE for efficient multiplexing, as shown below in a 4x100G to 400G muxponder application.

FOC’s 400G coherent pluggable transceivers use a next-generation coherent platform based on 7nm CMOS process coherent DSP (Digital Signal Processor), silicon photonics integrated optical devices, and high-density packaging technology. This enables a compact size, low power consumption and low cost per bit rate.

https://www.fujitsu.com/jp/group/foc/en/resources/news/press-releases/2020/20201009.html

Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Telstra launches 400G service based on Ciena

 Telstra has launched commercial wavelength services based on 400G technology from Ciena. For the deployment, Ericsson delivered Ciena’s WaveLogic Ai and WaveLogic 5 Extreme solutions along with associated local professional services for optical transmission. The higher bandwidth services can now quickly be delivered with a single card, offering on-demand capacity, from 100G up to 400G. 

In a trial, Telstra also achieved 700G per wavelength transmission between Melbourne and Sydney – a distance of greater than 1,000km.

“Telstra’s network is geared for 5G, cloud computing, and applications like edge-computing, and this is a significant and fundamental upgrade to the hidden infrastructure that powers our business across Australia.  By upgrading our optical transmission networks with 400G technology, Telstra will be able to cater for capacity demands of up to 400% of what was previously achievable. The upgrade enables us to rapidly deliver services to customers at scale without fibre builds, decreasing the time to market from weeks, to days” Chris Meissner, Transport, IP Core & Edge Engineering Telstra Executive, said.

“This optical transmission upgrade is an important step in increasing capacity requirements to meet unprecedented capacity demands.  This critical infrastructure capability forms the foundation of Telstra’s current and future network requirements and ensures Telstra can achieve transmission cost efficiencies and scale to meet the traffic demands that come with media rich and next generation services including 5G and edge compute services. This latest industry milestone will ensure that Australia remains at the cutting-edge of telecommunications technology,” Emilio Romeo, Head of Ericsson Australia and New Zealand said.

Monday, September 28, 2020

AT&T deploys open disaggregated core router

AT&T has deployed its open disaggregated core routing platform on its 400G transport network. The router leverages technology from Broadcom, DriveNets, and UfiSpace. 

The white box hardware, which was designed and manufactured by UfiSpace, is based on Broadcom’s Jericho2 switching silicon and Distributed, Dis-aggregated Chassis (DDC) design. It consists of three components: a 40x100G line card system, 10x400G line card system, and a 48x400G fabric system. These building blocks can be deployed in various configurations to build routers with capacity anywhere between 4 Tbps to 192 Tbps.

DriveNets Network Cloud solution and its  Network Operating System (NOS) software provides the management and control of the white box hardware. This enables MPLS transport across AT&T's global, multi-service core backbone. The software then connects into AT&T’s centralized SDN controller that optimizes the routing of traffic across the core.

AT&T notes that the deployment of this dis-aggregated core routing platform is coupled with the deployment of the company’s next gen long haul 400G optical transport platform.

“I’m proud to announce today that we have now deployed a next gen IP/MPLS core routing platform into our production network based on the open hardware designs we submitted to OCP last fall,” said Andre Fuetsch, AT&T’s CTO of Network Services, in his keynote speech at the Open Networking and Edge Summit (ONES). “We chose DriveNets, a disruptive supplier, to provide the Network Operating System (NOS) software for this core use case.”

“We are thrilled about this opportunity to work with AT&T on the development of their next gen, software-based core network,” said Ido Susan, CEO of DriveNets. “AT&T has a rigorous certification process that challenged my engineers to their limits, and we are delighted to take the project to the next level with deployment into the production network.”

AT&T contributes Distributed Disaggregated Chassis white box to OCP

AT&T has contributed its specifications for a Distributed Disaggregated Chassis (DDC) white box architecture to the Open Compute Project (OCP). The contributed design aims to define a standard set of configurable building blocks to construct service provider-class routers, ranging from single line card systems, a.k.a. “pizza boxes,” to large, disaggregated chassis clusters.  AT&T said it plans to apply the design to the provider edge (PE) and core routers that comprise its global IP Common Backbone (CBB).

“The release of our DDC specifications to the OCP takes our white box strategy to the next level,” said Chris Rice, SVP of Network Infrastructure and Cloud at AT&T. “We’re entering an era where 100G simply can’t handle all of the new demands on our network. Designing a class of routers that can operate at 400G is critical to supporting the massive bandwidth demands that will come with 5G and fiber-based broadband services. We’re confident these specifications will set an industry standard for DDC white box architecture that other service providers will adopt and embrace.”

AT&T’s DDC white box design, which is based on Broadcom’s Jericho2 chipset, calls for three key building blocks:

  • A line card system that supports 40 x 100G client ports, plus 13 400G fabric-facing ports.
  • A line card system that support 10 x 400G client ports, plus 13 400G fabric-facing ports.
  • A fabric system that supports 48 x 400G ports. A smaller, 24 x 400G fabric systems is also included.

AT&T points out that the line cards and fabric cards are implemented as stand-alone white boxes, each with their own power supplies, fans and controllers, and the backplane connectivity is replaced with external cabling. This approach enables massive horizontal scale-out as the system capacity is no longer limited by the physical dimensions of the chassis or the electrical conductance of the backplane. Cooling is significantly simplified as the components can be physically distributed if required. The strict manufacturing tolerances needed to build the modular chassis and the possibility of bent pins on the backplane are completely avoided.

Four typical DDC configurations include:

  • A single line card system that supports 4 terabytes per second (Tbps) of capacity.
  • A small cluster that consists of 1 plus 1 (added reliability) fabric systems and up to 4 line card systems. This configuration would support 16 Tbps of capacity.
  • A medium cluster that consists of 7 fabric systems and up to 24 line card systems. This configuration supports 96 Tbps of capacity.
  • A large cluster that consists of 13 fabric systems and up to 48 line card systems. This configuration supports 192 Tbps of capacity.
  • The links between the line card systems and the fabric systems operate at 400G and use a cell-based protocol that distributes packets across many links. The design inherently supports redundancy in the event fabric links fail.

DriveNet scales its disaggregated router to 400G

DriveNets, a start-up based in Israel, announced 400G-port routing support to its Network Cloud software-based disaggregated router.

The company says its Network Cloud is the only router on the market designed to scale 100/400G ports up to performance of 768 Tbps. Inspired by the hyperscalers, Network Cloud runs the routing data plane on cost-efficient white-boxes and the control plane on standard servers, disconnecting network cost from capacity growth.


DriveNets’ latest routing software release supports a packet-forwarding white-box based on Broadcom’s Jericho2 chipset which has high-speed, high-density port interfaces of 100G and 400G.

The platform is now being tested and certified by a tier-1 Telco customer.

DriveNets was founded in 2015 by Ido Susan and Hillel Kobrinsky. Susan previously co-founded Intucell, which was acquired by Cisco for $475 million. Kobrinsky founded the web conferencing specialist, Interwise, which was acquired by AT&T for $121 million.

In February, the company emerged from stealth with $110 Million in Series A funding.

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

VIAVI validates the performance of Nokia's CFP2 modules

 Nokia has validated its coherent optical modules using the VIAVI Solutions' ONT 800G FLEX DCO Module, which tests pluggable (CFP2) Digital Coherent Optics (DCO) modules. Nokia utilized this test capability as a beta customer, providing valuable feedback, and ultimately purchased the first ONT 800G FLEX DCO Module upon release.

Nokia collaborated with VIAVI to test its CFP2 DCO module against the different technologies with the 800G FLEX DCO Module. In particular, Nokia sought a solution which had coherent interfaces on the optical as well as the electrical sides, a capability not available from other vendors.

VIAVI said the 800G FLEX DCO Module for its optical network test platform offers native support for both 400G class CFP2 DCO and QSFP-DD 400ZR modules. Electrical adapters allow testing on prototype boards and integrated circuits before module integration, greatly accelerating product development.

"Carriers worldwide are investing in optical transport upgrades as they prepare for next-generation communications, and are entrusting us to drive more efficient operation while enhancing service quality," said Andreas Leven, Head of Engineering, High Speed Optical Networks, Nokia. 

"We are honored to work with industry leaders such as Nokia, allowing us to anticipate and respond to network technology evolution," said Tom Fawcett, Vice President and General Manager, Lab and Production Business Unit, VIAVI. "Thanks to that partnership, VIAVI has blazed yet another trail with the first coherent test solution to support the multiservice market at 400G, accelerating high-speed network test to ensure performance and interoperability."

https://www.viavisolutions.com/en-us/news-releases/nokia-selects-viavi-validate-performance-coherent-optical-modules

Thursday, September 3, 2020

Rain Tree Photonics and MaxLinear deliver 400G module for hyperscalers

Singapore-based Rain Tree Photonics (RTP) and MaxLinear announced the availability of a silicon photonics-based solution for 400G-DR4 optical modules for hyperscale data centers.

Rain Tree Photonics’ proprietary photonics engine leverages the company's silicon photonics integration technology and offers high yield and volume scalability. It is also developed to be ready for Co-Packaged Optics (CPO) architectures, while maintaining compatibility with pluggable module architectures.

MaxLinear’s MxL93542 Telluride PAM4 DSP is a key component in the development of high-speed, mega-scale data centers based on 100Gbps single lambda optical interconnects. This SOC and others in the Telluride family are the world’s first DSPs with integrated electro-absorption modulated laser (EA-EML) drivers for 100/400Gbps optical interconnects and breakout mode clocking support for 400Gbps DR4 optical modules.

The RTP1908, RTP’s 400G-DR4 silicon photonic engine, integrates multiple photonic devices allowing all 4 channels to fit into a tiny chip footprint. Each channel also features RTP’s energy-efficient modulator which is directly driven by the MxL93542’s integrated EA-EML driver. The entire photonic circuit is optimized for low optical insertion loss and features large mode-field-diameter fiber couplers that ensure high yield with standard packaging lines.

The MxL93542 16nm CMOS PAM4 DSP SoC consumes an extremely low 6.7W of power, which includes the integrated EA-EML driver power dissipation. The minimal power consumption of the MxL93542 meets the stringent power constraints of 400Gbps optical module form-factors, including QSFP-DD, OSFP and COBO devices.

“MaxLinear’s MxL93542 PAM4 DSP with integrated quad-channel EML drivers provides outstanding cost benefits for 400G-DR4 optical module customers. Driver integration also simplifies the module design, which together with RTP’s fabless++ approach, improves NPI cycle-time for customer adoption,” said Dr. Huang Ying, Co-founder at Rain Tree Photonics. “The MxL93542’s integrated drivers also work well with the high-efficiency, low-drive silicon photonic modulators in the RTP1908, achieving excellent TDECQ and OMA performance.”

“We are pleased with the successful pairing of the MxL93542 with Rain Tree Photonics’ RTP1908 silicon photonics engine to provide a compelling integrated solution for 400G-DR4 modules,” said Will Torgerson, Vice President and General Manager of MaxLinear’s High-Speed Interconnect Group. “The highly integrated Telluride DSPs offer superior link-margin performance and industry-leading power consumption.”


Monday, August 17, 2020

ESnet6 makes progress toward 400G upgrade

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is making great progress with the rollout of ESnet6, its next-generation network dedicated to serving the Department of Energy (DOE) national lab complex and overseas collaborators. ESnet6, which is expected to be complete in 2023, will see the deployment of next gen optical, core and service edge equipment on ESnet’s dedicated fiber optic cable backbone.

“We’ve had some delays, but our first priority is making sure the work is being done safely,” states ESnet6 Project Director Kate Mace, on the project's blog.

“We’re almost done with the optical layer, which is a big deal,” Mace said. “It’s been a major procurement of new optical line equipment from Infinera to light up the new optical footprint.”

https://esnetupdates.wordpress.com/

Sunday, August 9, 2020

California Research and Education Network upgrades to 400G

The California Research and Education Network (CalREN) is now able to provide high-capacity services, from 100G to 400G and beyond, on its coastal path between Los Angeles and Sunnyvale. The 460-mile upgraded optical route includes nodes in Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Soledad.

The upgrades leverages flex-grid spectrum Reconfigurable Optical Add-Drop Multiplexers (ROADMs). Flex grid optimizes the amount of spectrum used per wavelength, enabling more data capacity to be provisioned over fiber spans.

CalREN, which is operated by CENIC, serves the vast majority of K-20 students, educators, researchers, and individuals at other vital public-serving institutions. CalREN operates over 8,000 miles of fiber optic cable and serves more than 20 million users.

In 2019, CENIC upgraded the southern path of its network between Los Angeles and Riverside, including nodes in Tustin, Oceanside, San Diego, Escondido, and Sun City. Work will start in the fall on upgrades to the final inland path, which completes the network ring from Sunnyvale back to Los Angeles and includes nodes in Oakland, Sacramento, Fergus, Fresno, and Bakersfield.

“Next-generation infrastructure ensures CENIC can easily meet today’s networking demands while remaining flexible to meet the needs of tomorrow,” said CENIC President and CEO Louis Fox. “These upgrades provide CENIC’s members a more robust and efficient network on which to conduct data-intensive research, support teaching and learning, provide cutting-edge medical care, and enhance community engagement.”

CENIC is also supporting the Pacific Research Platform (PRP), a partnership of more than 50 institutions, led by researchers at UC San Diego and UC Berkeley, with support from the National Science Foundation. PRP builds on the optical backbone of Pacific Wave, a project of CENIC and Pacific Northwest Gigapop, to create a high-speed freeway for large scientific data sets by connecting campus networks and supercomputing centers on a regional scale, with Science DMZs at each site.

Developed by the US Department of Energy’s Energy Science Network (ESnet) engineers, the Science DMZ model addresses common network performance bottlenecks encountered at research institutions by creating an environment that is tailored to the needs of high-performance science applications, including high-volume bulk data transfer, remote experiment control, and data visualization. PRP’s design supports university researcher data analysis for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the NSF’s South Pole Neutrino Detector (IceCube), and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

CENIC deploys first 400G circuit in Los Angeles

CENIC, the organization that provides global connectivity for education and research institutions in California, has deployed a 400 Gbps single-carrier optical circuit between Los Angeles and Riverside. This marks one of the first-ever 400G superchannels to be deployed by a US regional research and education network. Construction included upgrading nodes in Los Angeles, Tustin, Oceanside, San Diego (home to the San Diego Supercomputer Center), Escondido, Sun City, and Riverside to 400G capabilities.

CENIC upgraded network infrastructure to flex spectrum Reconfigurable Optical Add-Drop Multiplexers (ROADMs) and the NCS 1004 transponder platform. CENIC used Cisco-loaned equipment for the validation in production and is now implementing the permanent infrastructure.

“This is an important networking milestone for CENIC,” said President and CEO Louis Fox. “With increasing demands for 100G services among our community, from research scientists working with big data sets to educators leveraging technology to transform the classroom, network capacity should not limit the work or ambitions of our researchers, teachers, or students.”

CENIC plans to expand its 400G provisioning capabilities along its coastal fiber path from Los Angeles to Sunnyvale by mid-2020.

CENIC’s network traffic continues to grow by roughly 60% each year. Between May 2018 and May 2019, the network moved an exabyte of data.

http://www.cenic.org

Precision OT debuts QSFP-DD 400G transceivers

Precision OT introduced its new line of QSFP-DD 400G optical transceivers supporting distances between 100m and 10km.

Precision OT is offering 4 different transceiver variants for this form factor to ensure that network operators' varying needs can be fully met. Precision's QSFP-DD transceivers support the continued growth of network traffic while being backwards compatible with existing QSFP optics.

"Optical transceivers, especially 400G-capable ones, are the key component in enabling more traffic to flow across today's networks," says Chris Page, CTO of Precision OT. "Single lambda 100G will be one of the most cost-effective ways for MSOs and data centers to deal with future bandwidth demands, because a single 100G line can reduce the costs of a typical 4x25G architecture by at least 40%. In this way, the use of four lines of 100G and PAM4 modulation can enable the 400G data rates our customers need to ensure they are ready for the future. For us, at Precision OT, it is about creating networking solutions that grow over time and accommodate increased demand cost-effectively, with both flexibility and agility."

http://www.precisionot.com

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Greece's OTEGLOBE upgrades IP backbone with Cisco 400G line cards

OTEGLOBE is upgrading its Cisco ASR 9900 routers with 400G Cisco ASR 9900 5th Generation Line Cards.

Headquartered in Athens, Greece, OTEGLOBE is a network backbone operator delivering transport, peering, and interconnect services throughout South-eastern Europe. It is also the wholesale carrier that reaches Western Europe through Greece over a fully mesh optical backbone network.

“At OTEGLOBE, we are determined to continue to lead the industry in innovation and invest in the high-caliber technologies that enable us to offer the best services to our customers,” said Panagiota Î’osdogianni, CTO, OTEGLOBE. “By introducing Cisco’s 400 GbE technology to our IP core network, we can respond seamlessly to traffic bursts during peak hours and accommodate even our largest customers’ needs with simplification, economic scale, improved flexibility, and an optimal customer experience.”

“With these latest network enhancements, we are providing OTEGLOBE with a long-term growth platform that scales ahead of the demand they’re seeing today and what they can anticipate in the years ahead,” said Jim Scott, Vice President, Cisco EMEAR Service Provider. “Together, we share a passion for connecting the unconnected, and offering the highest level of services to pave the way for the internet for the future.”

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

PacketLight rolls 400G muxponder/transponders

PacketLight Networks introduced its PL-4000 muxponder and transponder product line for DCI, 400G metro, and 200G long haul applications.

The PacketLight PL-4000 product family is an integrated optical solution offering mux/demux, amplifiers, optical switch and embedded Layer-1 optical encryption. It provides the full demarcation point between the service CPE and the DWDM uplink, and is interoperable with any third-party switch or router.

PacketLight's solution supports 400G multi-source agreement (MSA) pluggable coherent optical modules, standard FEC modes and the same management system. Support includes a variety of 400G line optics, such as high-performance CFP2-DCO, QSFP-ZR+ and QSFP-ZR, and different standard FEC modes such as C-FEC as defined by the OIF, O-FEC as defined in the Open ROADM standard, and SD-FEC for high performance demanding links. The CFP2 pluggable module used in the PL-4000 also provides ultra-long-haul connectivity in PacketLight's 200G product line.

“The 400G product line is yet another milestone in PacketLight’s position as a leading system vendor in the optical transport market, answering customer needs for 400G capacity as well as optimized CAPEX and OPEX,” said Koby Reshef, CEO of PacketLight Networks. “The PL-4000 family will bring lower cost per bit, better performance in less space and power consumption, optimizing the link budget.”

http://www.packetlight.com

Monday, June 29, 2020

Kyoto Semi intros InGaAs photodiode for 400G

Kyoto Semiconductor Co. introduced a high-speed, InGaAs photodiode to support 400Gbps transmission systems that use PAM4.

KP-H KPDEH12L-CC1C main features:

  • High-speed -- The size of the carrier on which the PD is mounted, and the width and length of the high frequency electrode pattern placed on the carrier are optimized using an electromagnetic simulation (Note 2). As a result, we have achieved the world’s top class 400Gbps and 40GHz as a frequency band with an integrated transimpedance amplifier. The KP-H photodiode has passed Telcordia GR-468-Core, which is the standard reliability test for communication equipment.
  • Easy implementation -- the photodiode is mounted on a carrier that is optimally designed to achieve high frequency. A condenser lens is integrated on the backside of the photodiode (Note 3), allowing the incoming light to collect in the light absorption area, and makes it easy to align the optical fiber with PD. The PD chip is mounted on a carrier twice as big as the chip itself.

Mass production is expected to begin in November 2020.

https://www.kyosemi.co.jp/en/lp/kpdeh12l-cc1c

Thursday, June 4, 2020

Blueprint 400GbE: The Next Era of Connectivity

Ben Baker, Senior Director of Cloud and SP Marketing, Juniper Networks

The network lies at the heart of everything we do, and it is more important now than ever as we shift toward an increasingly remote work and lifestyle. Network traffic is at record high and shows no signs of leveling off any time soon. Having 400GbE network capacity is critical in maintaining speed and ushering in the next era of connectivity. 

400GbE offers massive increases in capacity, density and power efficiency, and the demand for these capabilities is only growing. Many of the new technology trends we are excited about will require this level of compute, such as new cloud applications, emerging 5G networks, as well as the recent shift to remote work. 400GbE has been a long time coming, but now that we’re entering the 5G era with increased demands for high-bandwidth applications, we’re seeing a clearer path forward. 

Higher speeds can unlock new service capabilities, which pose greater revenue opportunities for service providers, cloud operators and enterprises alike. 400GbE offers more density, scale and power efficiency at a low cost, making it the perfect choice for data center networks, data center interconnect (DCI), and service provider core and transport networks. as well. So why don’t we see more of it out there? 

A Growing Demand
To understand the story of 400GbE, we have to start with the companies clamoring for it most urgently: cloud hyperscalers. Companies such as Google, Amazon and Facebook are experiencing explosive traffic growth across their data centers. Facebook, for example, generates four petabytes of new data every day. Google’s requirements for its data center networks double every 12-15 months. Trying to meet those demands with 100GbE links is like trying to pump a firehose worth of water through a handful of drinking straws. It’s doable, but time intensive

400GbE requires a lengthy time investment for equipment vendors to align around Multi-Source Agreements (MSAs) on optical standards, and therefore the fully realized potential of the technology has been delayed. These optical standards then require exhaustive testing, which can be a long, complex process. That said, the end result is hugely beneficial to the entire ecosystem and will be critical as we evolve into the next era of high-speed technology. 

As we move closer to large-scale commercial viability of 400GbE, expect to see major optical advances this year. Ongoing development of silicon photonics, for example, will further the convergence of optical transport with routing and switching, delivering pluggable transceiver capabilities on fixed configuration platforms or directly on line cards for modular platforms. 

Solving for the Next Wave of Challenges
As we prepare for these advances and wait for 400GbE economics to catch up with demand, here are some considerations to think about:

  • Think open and interoperable. Pursue platforms based on open standards-based technologies, with multi-vendor interoperability and zero lock-in. This will save you in the long run on capital expenditures and operational flexibility.
  • Get 400GbE-ready. As you pursue network refresh cycles, look for fixed configuration or modular solutions that support QSFP56-DD interfaces for 400GbE services, so you can make the transition quickly and easily—such as by swapping out one pluggable with another. 
  • Prioritize inline security. For many organizations, any traffic that leaves the data center must be encrypted. Look for 400GbE solutions that can provide MACsec encryption inline, so you don’t have to use separate components that increase power consumption and costs while sapping performance. 
  • Achieve telemetry at scale. To manage and monitor your network as you scale up, you need networking equipment that can scale telemetry capabilities as well. That means supporting millions of counters and many millions of filter operations per second. 
The Bottom Line
Internet traffic is growing exponentially and operators are trying to navigate the path forward to keep up with the exploding traffic growth. Service providers and cloud operators are fast approaching the tipping point where commercial solutions become viable. Delivering the next generation of digital services and applications—or even just supporting current ones more efficiently—requires a strong foundation powered by 400GbE. 

Thursday, May 21, 2020

Nokia debuts WaveFabric Elements: photonic chips, devices, subsystems

Nokia unveiled its WaveFabric Elements portfolio of photonic chips, devices and subsystems, including its fifth generation coherent digital signal processor family, the Photonic Service Engine V (PSE-V).
The company said its WaveFabric Elements address the demanding power, performance, and cost-per-bit requirements of 400G networking across data center, metro, core and subsea applications.

Nokia’s WaveFabric Elements portfolio combines digital signal processing (DSP) and optics technologies focused on emerging end-to-end 400G applications. The new, fifth generation coherent DSP family consists of multiple designs optimized for different optical networking applications, form factors, and platforms. These include:

  • PSE-Vs (super coherent), which can run up to 90 Gbaud and employ the second generation of Nokia Bell Labs-pioneered probabilistic constellation shaping (PCS). PSE-Vs are capable of transporting up to 800G, while providing 60% greater reach, 40% lower power per bit, and 15% greater spectral efficiency than previous DSP generations. 
  • PSE-Vc (compact), which enables programmable capacity from 100G to 400G with metro to long haul capability. Its extremely low power enables integration into a variety of pluggable transceiver modules.

The new DSPs are complemented by the CSTAR portfolio of coherent optical modules from its recent acquisition of Elenion Technologies. CSTAR leverages state-of-the-art silicon photonics and packaging technology, and addresses applications, including intra-data center, metro DCI and long-reach optical transport. In addition to pairing them with the new PSE-V DSPs within Nokia platforms, the company will sell them independently to industry partners for integration into pluggable transceiver modules available to the broader market.

The CSTAR family of optical engines is currently shipping to customers. PSE-V-based platforms and pluggables will be available beginning in Q4 2020.

Sam Bucci, Head of Optical Networks at Nokia, said: "Networks are truly at an inflection point, and 400G will be a catalyst for a significant transformation. With our WaveFabric Elements portfolio, Nokia is committed to supplying the 400G optical ecosystem with components, subsystems and design services, as well as continuing to build the highest performing optical transport solutions for the 400G era and beyond."



https://www.nokia.com/networks/technologies/pse-super-coherent-technology/

Nokia to acquire Elenion for silicon photonics

Nokia agreed to acquire Elenion a start-up developing silicon photonics-based System-on-Chip solutions that can be produced in a CMOS foundry. Financial terms were not disclosed.

Elenion, which was founded in 2014 and is based in New York City, develops highly integrated, low-cost silicon photonics technologies for short-reach and high-performance optical interfaces and has pioneered a design toolset which enables a greatly simplified, low cost, scalable manufacturing process. The Elenion platform simplifies integration with optical chipsets, lowers power consumption, improves port density and helps to lower the overall cost per bit for network operators.

Nokia said Elenion's state-of-the-art silicon photonics design platform improves product costs by bringing simplification and scale to the optical supply chain. It is expected to bring time-to-market and cost advantages to Nokia’s broad portfolio of networking solutions.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Whitepaper: 7 Principles of AT&T’s Network Transformation

AT&T published a nine-page whitepaper outlining seven tenets of its network transformation.

In a blog post, Scott Mair, President, AT&T Technology & Operations, says the company's network carried an average of 335 petabytes of data per day during Q4 2019. This jumped 20% because of the COVID-19 response. AT&T is on track to hit is its 75% SDN and automation goal this year, to deliver nationwide 5G this summer, and to expand its 400G deployment.

The whitepaper discusses the following “7 Principles of AT&T’s Network Transformation”:

  1. Network growth necessitates economies of scale that can only be achieved from interoperability and open disaggregation
  2. White Box hardware/software disaggregation using open dNOS, such as AT&T’s Vyatta NOS, is proliferating from the network edge to the core
  3. Network edge densification is critical for low latency, near-real time connections, highspeed requirements for 5G and low latency enterprise applications
  4. AT&T’s Mobility Core and IP Communication Core are pivoting to be cloud native
  5. ONAP and AT&T’s ECOMP SDN platform are evolving for diverse NFV instantiation orchestration models - APIs not GUIs
  6. Cloud-Based Data Warehouse, Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence, and policy-driven SDN-control are a powerful combination 
  7. AT&T network security paradigm is rapidly changing from the customer premise, to the network edge, and at its core 

The full whitepaper is here:
https://about.att.com/content/dam/snrdocs/7_Tenets_of_ATTs_Network_Transformation_White_Paper.pdf

Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Windstream tests 400GbE QSFP-DD customers interfaces with Infinera

Windstream Wholesale and Infinera demonstrated 400GbE client-side services with commercially available ultra-efficient 400GbE-LR8 QSFP-DD compact pluggable interfaces.

The trial leveraged Infinera’s commercially available 2x 600G Wavelength muxponder on its Groove (GX) G30 Compact Modular Platform with the CHM-2T sled, which enabled the customer-facing 400GbE service to be transmitted using a single-carrier 600G wavelength.

Windstream Wholesale said it is currently engaging with customers for initial deployment of the end-to-end 400G Wave service.

“We’re excited to partner with Windstream and leverage the power and flexibility of our 600G Wavelength technology to deliver enhanced high-speed services,” said Glenn Laxdal, SVP, GM of Product Management, Infinera. “The ability to support 400GbE services with a wide-variety of client interfaces and to carry those services across metro, regional and long-haul distances enables Windstream to seamlessly support their customers’ evolving connectivity needs.”

“Our customers’ bandwidth requirements are growing rapidly, and Windstream is increasing network capacity to meet this demand,” said Buddy Bayer, chief network officer at Windstream. “Infinera’s GX G30 Compact Modular Platform provides an ultra-efficient transport solution enabling us to offer 400GbE services to support our customers’ high-bandwidth needs. The use of LR8 clients with a single mode fiber interface and a 10-kilometer reach provides an extremely cost-effective solution by enabling us to extend these services directly to our customers’ premises.”

https://www.windstreamenterprise.com/wholesale/interactive-map

Windstream adds to long-haul with Infinera’s FlexILS Line System

Windstream Wholesale will add over 1,000 miles to its Next Gen flexible ultra-long-haul fiber network using Infinera’s FlexILS line system.

The route from Salt Lake City to Portland and Seattle will provide diverse, low-latency connectivity to markets in the Pacific Northwest.

Windstream also announced that, as part of an ongoing program to enhance its long-haul network, it has increased the capacity of several major routes to 48 Tbps.

The overlay is powered by Infinera’s FlexILS line system. The flexible grid-compliant open optical line system features C+L-band support and colorless-directionless-contentionless (CDC) ROADM.

“Our new route to the Pacific Northwest, along with the overlay of existing routes with Infinera’s FlexILS technology, is a response to increasing customer demand for bandwidth,” said Joe Scattareggia, executive vice president of Windstream Wholesale. “These ongoing initiatives pave the way for Windstream Wholesale to meet customers’ needs for high-quality, low-latency services across our most popular routes for years to come.”

“We are delighted to support Windstream with solutions that enable them to meet their customers’ evolving need for high-bandwidth, low-latency services,” said Nick Walden, senior vice president, worldwide sales, Infinera. “Infinera’s uniquely scalable C+L solution is an ideal fit to meet Windstream’s initiatives for future bandwidth needs by significantly increasing and, in some cases, more than doubling capacity on its existing fiber links.

Windstream Wholesale previously announced an overlay of its Dallas to Atlanta route.

Windstream signs its largest wavelengths deal

Windstream Wholesale signed its largest capacity wavelengths deal to date. A major hyperscale customer (unnamed) will purchase wavelengths to interconnect data centers in key cities in the United States.

Windstream said this deal, combined with additional wave capacity contracted in October, represents 5.7 terabits of capacity – the most sold in any single month at Windstream Wholesale.

Windstream Wholesale’s coast-to-coast long-haul and regional express fiber-optic network provides high-speed optical Wavelengths to support today’s massive data demands stemming from cloud computing, multimedia and bandwidth intensive applications. Our optical Wavelengths service features unique, diverse routes with high-speed connections from attractive Tier 2 and Tier 3 markets back to the most popular carrier hotels, data centers, cable landing stations and 1,200+ 1G to 100G capable POPs in Tier 1 markets in the country.

Thursday, April 2, 2020

uSenlight employs MaxLinear's PAM4 DSPs for 400G modules

uSenlight Corporation, a key OEM developing high speed, high performance, reliable integrated optical modules for datacenter, FTTx, optical networking and CPRI/LTE applications, has selected MaxLinear’s MxL93542, Telluride PAM4 DSP, to develop its next-generation 400G-DR4 and FR4 optical modules.

The new optical modules build upon the success of uSenlight’s current product offerings of 100G QSFP28 PSM4 and 100G QSFP28 CWDM4 modules for data center connectivity. uSenlight’s experience in data center transceiver design and its manufacturing capabilities enable them to meet the growing demands of hyperscale data center customers.

MaxLinear’s MxL935xx Telluride PAM4 DSPs are key components in the development of high-speed, mega-scale data centers based on 100Gbps single lambda optical interconnects. MaxLinear’s SOCs offer integrated electro-absorption modulated laser (EA-EML) drivers for 100/400Gbps optical interconnects and breakout mode clocking support for 400Gbps DR4 optical modules. The MxL93542 400G PAM4 DSP allows companies like uSenlight to develop a 400Gbps optical interconnect module in a compact form factor for intra-datacenter applications with a transmission distance up to 2 kilometers.

“Telluride DSPs offer industry leading integration, power consumption, and link-margin performance,” said Will Torgerson, Vice President and General Manager of MaxLinear’s High-Speed Interconnect Group. "We are pleased to see that these features will enable uSenlight to develop next-generation 400G-DR4 and FR4 optical modules to address the massive demand to deploy higher speed networks in next-generation hyperscale data centers.”

“MaxLinear’s MxL93542 PAM4 DSP with integrated EML driver offers the highest level of integration compared with other DSPs on the market,” said Dr. Charles Wu, President of uSenlight Corporation. “The integration and performance of the MxL93542 PAM4 DSP is enabling us to expand our portfolio by developing 400Gbps optical interconnects for hyperscale datacenters.”

http://www.maxlinear.com/MxL93542

Monday, March 9, 2020

Ciena and Arista conduct 400GE interoperability test

Ciena and Arista recently completed an interoperability test of their respective 400GE transport solution and high density native 400GE router.

The interoperability test leveraged Ciena’s Waveserver 5, powered by WaveLogic 5 Extreme (WL5e) coherent optics, and Arista’s 7280DR3 to show how high-bandwidth 100GE and 400GE client traffic can be maximized across any distance, supporting fiber capacities up to 38.4Tbps. The testing included successful transport of two 400GbE client signals from Arista’s 7280DR3 across a single WL5e 800G wavelength on Ciena’s Waveserver 5, demonstrating the most capacity achieved in the industry over a single set of electro-optics.

Ciena’s Waveserver 5 supports up to 12.8Tbps in a compact 2RU footprint and enables providers to maximize transport of high-bandwidth 100GE and 400GE client traffic across any distance using minimal hardware. Arista’s 7280DR3-24 router supports 9.6Tbps of throughput with 24x400GE ports in an ultra-compact 1RU footprint.

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Acacia samples 400ZR, OpenZR+, Open ROADM MSA

Acacia Communications has begun sampling multiple variants in its family of 400G pluggable optical transceiver modules, including 400ZR, OpenZR+, and Open ROADM MSA. Volume production is expected in the second half of 2020.

Acacia’s 400G pluggable module family features an expansive list of interoperability solutions in QSFP-DD, OSFP and CFP2-DCO pluggable form factors for cloud data center interconnects (DCIs) and service provider networks. The modules are based on Acacia's Greylock 7nm DSP, its 3rd generation of coherent DSP. The company is pursuing a 3D Siliconization approach that allows for high volume manufacturing processes.

OpenZR represents the combination of 400ZR and the Open ROADM MSA. It targets metro regional DCI applications.

Acacia said 400G pluggable modules represent a key architectural change in high-bandwidth data center interconnects because they can be plugged directly into switches and routers offering the same density for both coherent DWDM and client optics in the same chassis.

“We’re excited to be successfully passing traffic in the lab with the Acacia 400G-OSFP-ZR module in our 7000 Series switches and routers,” said Hacene Chaouch, Distinguished Engineer at Arista Networks. “400ZR is critical to meeting customer demand for growing data center interconnect bandwidth and we believe the thermal and optical performance of Acacia’s coherent platform in the OSFP form factor will provide network operators with a very reliable and power efficient solution.”

“Acacia is reinforcing its coherent pluggable leadership by sampling 400G technology in multiple form factors,” said Andrew Schmitt, Directing Analyst at Cignal AI. “Interoperable 400G solutions have the potential to transform cloud DCI and traditional operator architectures and create new applications for coherent optics at the edge of the network.”

Acacia also noted the following company milestones
> 200,000 coherent silicon photonic integrated circuits
> 400,000 coherent DSP ports
> 125,000 pluggable DCO modules

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Huawei launches 400GE routers with Committed SLA

Huawei introduced its NetEngine 8000 series 400GE routers featuring committed SLA capabilities.

Huawei's NetEngine 8000 series routers will offer the industry's highest-density with thirty-six 400GE interfaces per slot, enabling it to meet the ever-increasing traffic growth of the metro network, backbone network, and data center. Huawei said it is the only vendor that can provide 400GE transmission distances of 10, 40, and 80 km.

Huawei supports hard isolation through FlexE-based network slicing in order to ensure zero bandwidth preemption among services and 100% bandwidth guarantee for key services. The granularity of Huawei's FlexE-based network slicing is five times finer than the industry average, providing high-quality guarantee for more services.

Huawei also supports SRv6-based path computation. The path with the optimal latency can be selected based on services' latency requirements, so that low latency can be guaranteed for key services. Huawei is the major contributor of SRv6 standards and have participated in the formulation of over 83% of standards. To date, Huawei has carried out over 20 commercial deployments worldwide.

Huawei is also proposing in-situ Flow Information Telemetry (iFIT) technology in order to support service-based and flow-based performance detection as well as SLA visualization. iMaster NCE is used together to provide fault locating within minutes, which ensures high network availability.

Daniel Tang, CTO of Huawei's Data Communication Product Line, said, "To address the network challenges in the 5G and cloud era, Huawei has innovatively developed the industry's first E2E 400GE routers, - NetEngine 8000 - and the industry's first committed SLA solution to deliver 400GE and committed SLA on IP networks."

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Telia Carrier's 400GE-ready IP backbone powered by Cisco NCS5500 routers

Telia Carrier has launched a full-scale, 400GE-ready network supported by Cisco NCS5500 series routers.

The launch follows Telia Carrier’s successful deployment of more than 10,000 new 100GE ports during 2019 using the same platform.

Telia Carrier’s customer base now exceeds 2,000 customers in more than 120 countries.

Cisco said the ongoing standardization of 400GE coherent technologies also incentivises new, simplified and partially disaggregated IP over DWDM architectures. The NCS5500 will play a key role in realizing Telia Carrier’s ambitions to spearhead that wave as they are already deploying open optical line systems across several continents.

“Conventional architectures and technologies built on decades of accumulated complexity and yesterday's truths fall short in helping us keep up with customer demands for more, consistent bandwidth and a high-quality experience. This is especially true as more value is shifting to software, hardware cycles are becoming shorter and ongoing 400G standardization is poised to finally disrupt the optical networking market,” said Staffan Göjeryd, CEO, Telia Carrier. “With Cisco leading the market in high capacity transport, they were the perfect fit to help us reach this monumental milestone to continue to perform at the highest calibre, while also reducing costs.”

“We are aligned in our mission to make connections reach further and bring the world closer through innovative technology,” said Kevin Wollenweber, Vice President of Networking, Cisco Service Provider Business. “Combining Cisco’s cloud-scale technology with the strength of the Telia Carrier network, we are helping Telia Carrier customers across more than 120 countries realize the full potential of what the Internet for the Future can do for them.”

http://thenetwork.cisco.com