Sunday, January 6, 2019

Continental develops 5G-Hybrid Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X)

Continental unveiled a 5G hybrid Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) platform that integrates technologies not only for 4G and 5G network access, but also Dedicated Short Range Communication (DSRC) and Cellular-V2X for direct V2X communication.

The company said its V2X, which is being demonstrated at this week's CES 2019 in Las Vegas, provides a global solution for auto manufacturers as the technical path to establish direct V2X communication varies regionally. Some regions prefer the established DSRC and others lean toward the upcoming Cellular-V2X standard.

A practical example: if vehicles approach a construction site, short-range V2X communication begins to communicate this situation within a half mile range. As a result, the driver is prepared for the situation when the car reaches the actual construction site or the end of a forming line of traffic. If seamless long-range communication also transmitted this warning with a longer lead time, the driver would be offered more options, having more time to prepare for a forming traffic jam or to get into the recommended lane, as an example. The construction workers also benefit from the advanced information as it reduces the risk of a car running into them. Based on Continental’s platform, such use cases could soon become reality on roads throughout the world. For China, this global project even marks the first series development of a V2X product.

“Winning a first project based on our 5G-Hybrid-V2X platform is not only great news for us but for the entire industry. Bringing 5G on the development roadmap so early demonstrates that the automotive industry has its finger on the pulse of digitalization,” said Johann Hiebl, head of the business units Body & Security and Infotainment & Connectivity at Continental. “Additionally, deploying V2X on such a large, global scale marks an important stepping stone for safer and more intelligent mobility.”

“Ad-hoc networking through V2X has the potential to drastically increase driving safety. Direct information from other vehicles can improve the decision-making of drivers and automated driving functions,” said Murali Srinivasan, head of Passive Safety and Sensorics for Continental North America. “To fulfill this task, V2X technology must be as fast and reliable as possible – and it must be available globally. To date, short-range communication and long-range communication are two different systems with dedicated Electronic Control Units (ECUs). Networking both types of communication more closely will bring safety benefits.”

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