Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Open Daylight. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query Open Daylight. Sort by date Show all posts

Monday, April 24, 2017

The New Open Source Networking Universe, managed by The Linux Foundation

This month's Open Networking Summit (ONS 2017) in Silicon Valley, which marked the sixth instalment of the annual event since its origin at Stanford University, once again brought many key thought leaders together for keynotes, tutorials, conference sessions, panel discussions and a small exhibition. ONS was the event that set off alarm bells across the industry in 2012 when Google announced that SDN had moved well beyond the research phase and into its commercial network, using a home-grown solution and no routing equipment from conventional vendors.

As far as the current state of open source networking is concerned, perhaps Margaret Chiosi, formerly at AT&T and now with Huawei, put it best, commenting (paraphrased from her keynote), 'open networking has reached the peak of exuberance and not yet crossed the chasm of despair'. In other words, great ideas are flourishing but no one is yet really making money or saving money with open networking. In addition, Guru Parulkar, executive director of ON.Lab, observed that while there are many proof-of-concepts and early deployments, a 'resource gap' of qualified professionals may delay large scale deployments. New technology is difficult and committed resources must be in place if network transformations are to really happen.

ONS 2017 was presented by The Linux Foundation, the San Francisco-based organisation with the lofty ambition of creating the 'largest shared technology investment' in history. A mural at the entrance to the exhibition depicts the New Open Source Networking Universe, and certainly a tremendous amount of intellectual capital is being collected, curated and assembled into specifications and frameworks impacting every layer of the network.

The following is the line-up of networking related projects underway at the Linux Foundation (although there are more non-networking LF projects and other open source networking projects, such as Open Stack, that are not managed by LF).

ONAP

The Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) unites two major open networking and orchestration projects, AT&T's open source ECOMP and the Open Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O). This newly launched LF project is one of the largest open source networking initiatives, with members including Amdocs, AT&T, Bell Canada, China Mobile, China Telecom, Cisco, Ericsson, GigaSpaces, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Metaswitch, Nokia, Orange, Tech Mahindra, Reliance Jio, VMware, ZTE and other leading network operators, OEMs and platform providers.

OPNFV

A carrier-grade, integrated, open source platform to accelerate the introduction of new NFV products and services. OPNFV is mainly focused on building NFV Infrastructure (NFVI) and Virtualized Infrastructure Management (VIM) by integrating components from upstream projects such as OpenDaylight, OpenStack, Ceph Storage, KVM, Open vSwitch and Linux. At ONS 2017, OPNFV made its 4th major release, codenamed Danube, adding foundational support for MANO. The next release, codenamed Euphrates and targeted for completion by October, is expected to include more containerisation support.

Open Daylight

One of the largest projects, this promotes and advances the global development, distribution, and adoption of the OpenDaylight (ODL), the largest open source SDN controller. Many industry vendors participate in ODL.

ONOS

A SDN operating system for service providers that has scalability, high availability, high performance and abstractions to make it easy to create applications and services. At ONS 2017 the ONOS community made its next platform release, adding support for IPv6 routing, vLAN tagged external interfaces and AAA endpoint authentication, a better GUI interface, VPLS support and various southbound enhancements. Notable members of the ONOS community include AT&T, Comcast, China Unicom, Google, NTT Communications, SK Telecom and Verizon.

CORD

Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD) combines NFV, SDN and the elasticity of commodity clouds to bring data centre economics and cloud agility to the telco central office (CO). CORD lets the operator manage central offices using declarative modelling languages for agile, real-time configuration of new customer services. Three versions are underway - Mobile CORD, Residential CORD, Enterprise CORD – and each has multiple proof-of-concept demos.

DPDK

The Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) consists of libraries to accelerate packet processing workloads running on a wide variety of CPU architectures. DPDK was created in 2010 by Intel and made available under a permissive open source license. Today, more than 20 key open source projects build on DPDK libraries, including MoonGen, mTCP, Ostinato, Lagopus, Fast Data (FD.io), Open vSwitch, OPNFV, and OpenStack. This community has just moved to the Linux Foundation. Gold members of the project are ARM, AT&T, Cavium, Intel, Mellanox, NXP, Red Hat, and ZTE; Silver members include 6WIND, Atomic Rules, Huawei, Spirent, and Wind River. The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), University of Limerick, University of Massachusetts Lowell and Tsinghua University are Associate members.

FRRouting (FRR)

Free range routing (FRR) is a project endeavouring to make the best open source routing stack. FRR, which originated in the Quagga project, includes protocol daemons for BGP, IS-IS, LDP, OSPF, PIM and RIP. At ONS, it was announced that this project will now be managed by the Linux Foundation.

Open Switch (OVS)

An open-source implementation of a distributed virtual multi-layer switch, the main purpose of Open vSwitch is to provide a switching stack for hardware virtualisation in a network.

PNDA

Platform for Network Data Analytics (PNDA) aims to eliminate complexity by integrating, scaling and managing a set of open data processing technologies and by providing an end-to- end platform for deploying analytics applications and services. The big idea is that open source big data analytics can play in accelerating the transition to more agile, assured and orchestrated services. At ONS 2017, the MEF demonstrated a reference implementation of LSO (Lifecycle Services Orchestration) analytics using PNDA.

AllJoyn

AllJoyn is developing an open source framework for IoT.

Cloud Foundry

Cloud Foundry aims to make it faster and easier to build, test, deploy and scale applications.

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation

This group focuses on the development of open source technologies, reference architectures and common formats for cloud-native applications or services.

The Open Container Initiative

Building a vendor-neutral, portable and open specification and runtime for container-based solutions, founding members of this initiative include nine new companies committed to the OCI, with members including: Amazon Web Services, Apcera, Apprenda, AT&T, ClusterHQ, Cisco, CoreOS, Datera, Dell, Docker, EMC, Fujitsu Limited, Goldman Sachs, Google, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Huawei, IBM, Infoblox, Intel, Joyent, Kismatic, Kyup, Mesosphere, Microsoft, Midokura, Nutanix, Odin, Oracle, Pivotal, Polyverse, Portworx, Rancher Labs, Red Hat, Resin.io, Scalock, Sysdig, SUSE, Twistlock, Twitter, Univa, Verizon Labs, VMware and Weaveworks.

The Xen Project


This is the leading open source virtualisation platform that powers some of the largest clouds in production today. Amazon Web Services, Aliyun, Rackspace Public Cloud, Verizon Cloud, and many hosting services use Xen Project software.

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Launching Open.ConvergeDigest.com -- An Open Networking Showcase

by James E. Carroll

We're pleased to announce the launch of our mini-website on Open Networking.

This sub-domain of the Converge! Digest site showcases top ideas and technology demonstrations related to SDN, NFV, Open Stack, Open Daylight, Open Flow, ONOS, OPNFV, Open vSwitch, Open Computer and other open source efforts aimed at making networking more agile, programmable, scalable and lower cost.

Our series kicks off with short videos from top insiders sharing their views on how Open Networking initiatives are changing the course of the industry:





Got an idea for this series?  Please contact Jim Carroll 

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Cisco Creates DevNet Labs to Foster Innovation

Cisco is expanding its DevNet developer program with the launch of DevNet Labs, a place for developers to share their innovations and co-create with other DevNet developers. The idea is to share ideas and code on how to develop modern applications that integrate with the network infrastructure.

DevNet was established one and a half years ago in Cisco’s CTO Office under Dave Ward. The program is now moving under Rowan Trollope.

Cisco is seeding DevNet Labs with a number of innovation projects developed inside Cisco but now ready for the open community:

  • DevIoT: DevIoT is an extensible integrated developer environment for writing IoT apps. DevIoT helps design, deploy, and operate IoT apps.
  • Glance: Glance is a cloud application that uses indoor location information to find experts and track devices and assets. It is built on Cisco’s CMX platform, which exposes indoor location information through APIs on Cisco’s 802.11 access points and Mobility Services Engine.
  • NeXt: NeXt is an HTML/javascript UI toolkit that allows developers to easily visualize network topologies in network web applications. The NeXt SDK was released on DevNet last spring and will be released as an open source project in Open Daylight.
  • Open Daylight BGP apps: We are sharing the source code for a number of BGP apps we built on top of Open Daylight. These apps draw topologies using NeXt with information from BGP-LS topology information and program MPLS traffic engineering paths using PCEP.

https://communities.cisco.com/community/developer/devnetlabs/blog

Sunday, April 23, 2017

The Open Network Automation Platform looks like a turning point for telecom architecture

The biggest news out of the recentOpen Networking Summit in Silicon Valley is that the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project, which unites AT&T's open source ECOMP and the Open Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O), has made substantive progress toward becoming a dominant lifecycle service management platform for the telecom industry.

Senior executives from AT&T, China Mobile and The Linux Foundation took the ONS stage to declare that ONAP is not only a path towards more open, agile and cost effect carrier networks, but it is perhaps The Path forward for the networks that support the majority of the world’s mobile users. Besides AT&T (with 135 million mobile users) and China Mobile (853 million), the ONAP project has attracted the endorsement, support or commitment to early trials from other key operators including Orange (265 million accesses), Bell, China Telecom, China Unicom and the hot, new Reliance Jio in India. Together, these operators serve 38% of the global wireless subscriber base. The Linux Foundation said they are already in discussions with mobile operators representing a further 34% of the global subscriber base, so clearly we are talking about enormous market clout.

The project description for ONAP states that ONAP is an open source software platform that delivers capabilities for the design, creation, orchestration, monitoring and life cycle management of: low-level virtual network functions (VNFs); the carrier-scale software defined networks (SDNs) that contain them; and higher-level services that combine the above.

From a functionality point of view, ONAP is expected to handle:

•   Automated onboarding.

•   Automated deployment.

•   Automated management.

•   Intelligent operation of network resources using big data and AI for policy optimisation.

The first vendors to announce ONAP support include companies that worked with AT&T on its ECOMP and Domain 2.0 initiatives, including Amdocs, Cisco, Ericsson and Metaswitch, along with key suppliers for the OPEN-O project, which include Huawei, H3C and ZTE). However, with this level of market momentum, expect all vendors to jump on board as quickly as possible. As the ONAP technical steering committees get establish, now would seem a good time to demonstrate enthusiasm and expertise in this new project.

A developer Wiki has already been set-up (and can be accessed here: https://wiki.onap.org/), and the ONAP governing board members have elected the individuals to serve in key roles, while the governance structure was established via The Linux Foundation, with key appointments including:

•   Chair: Chris Rice, SVP of AT&T Labs.

•   President: Yachen Wang, deputy director of the Network Technology Department at China Mobile Research Institute.

•   Treasurer: Vincent Danno, director wireline standards, Innovation Technical and Marketing at Orange corporate.

How we got here

AT&T’s Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) platform has been running in its production network for the past two and half years. The company states that ECOMP contains over 8 million lines of code and that over one hundred virtual network functions are currently supported, including all of its VoLTE traffic. The ECOMP capabilities are also multi-layer, with optical wavelengths orchestrated by the system.

ECOMP was first publicly discussed in depth by AT&T at ONS 2016 (March 2016), when John Donovan, the company’s chief strategy office, described it as the 'next big thing'. Donovan said ECOMP was the most sophisticated software project that AT&T has ever undertaken. ECOMP's aim was to be the engine that powers its software-centric network, with the goal of enabling high utilisation of network resources by combining dynamic, policy-enforced functions for component and workload shaping, placement, execution and administration. At the time, AT&T published its ECOMP white paper, which has since attracted over 7,000 downloads.

In September 2016, Orange became the first telecom company to join AT&T's ECOMP effort. Orange agreed to test the platform for creating and managing its own software-defined network. The carriers also agreed to collaborate on open source and standardisation initiatives to accelerate the standardisation of SDN and NFV. As the first ECOMP partner, Orange perhaps played a critical role in persuading AT&T to move ahead with the idea of contributing its 8 million lines of code to open source. After all, there must have been many reasonable voices from within the company advising against a new and risky strategy of giving away its intellectual property, its crown jewels, for free. In December 2016, Bell Canada became the second carrier to join the ECOMP team.

The OPEN-Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O) was first announced at Mobile World Congress 2016. Its mission was to develop the first open source software framework and orchestrator to enable agile software-defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualisation (NFV) operations. The initiative was driven by China Mobile and Huawei, with early support from Brocade, China Telecom, DynaTrace, Ericsson, F5 Networks, GigaSpaces, Infoblox, Intel, KT, Red Hat, Raisecom, Riverbed and ZTE. In November 2016, OPEN-O launched its first major software release, codenamed SUN.

Many questions about what comes next

With the agreement only just coming into place and technical integration work yet to begin, it is too early to forecast how other models will be impacted. Is it game over for other service orchestration systems? Will other open networking projects, such as ONOS, Open Daylight and OPNFV be redirected to become perfect fits into ONAP? How will ETSI NFV evolve? And what of privately-developed orchestration systems, such as BluePlanet?

Presumably these will also need to adapt to the coming reality of a widely supported ONAP. On the other hand, will one open orchestration system be able to fit all use cases and service providers? And what about the public cloud providers?

The telcos are racing to make their infrastructure hardware more like cloud data centres, while companies such as AWS already have sophisticated software systems in place to bring up new equipment, services and customers quickly and efficiently. From the cloud operators perspective, will the 8 million lines of ONAP prove to be impressive? If so, and if the majority of telcos really agree to this common service orchestration model, will this give them an advantage over cloud operators?


Microsoft has already joined the ONAP project, the only cloud provider to announce its membership in the group so far. However, it is possible that a cloud provider like Google or Microsoft could have a better orchestration system, and perhaps they could find a business case to offer it on a wholesale basis.

Sunday, October 25, 2015

Blueprint: NFV - the New and Improved Network…with Some of the Same Old Baggage

by Douglas Tait, Director, Product Marketing, Oracle Communications

Network function virtualization (NFV) is in motiion Software functions are separating from hardware infrastructure and virtualizing, then becoming capable of running on a wide array of suitable hardware. In fact, NFV adoption is so strong that according to a statement made by Heavy Reading analyst Jim Hodges at the recent NFV Everywhere event in Dallas, the global NFV market will grow from $485.3 million in 2014 to $2.2 billion by the end of this year. The promise here, of course, is that communications service providers (CSPs) can reduce operational and expenditure costs related to updating, maintaining, or enhancing network functions by decoupling the software from the hardware.  This provides CSPs with more options to buy and deploy best-of-breed software components that run on best-of-breed hardware components.

If only it were that simple.

This article will cover why the path to NFV isn’t so clear cut, and some ideas for overcoming the complexity.  

The New and Improved Network

The NFV “divide and conquer” approach makes sense—the software lifecycle is completely different from the hardware lifecycle, and IT has made huge strides in developing and testing software virtualization technology. NFV provides the blueprint to virtualize software and deploy agile services when needed, or when upgrades are required, all without major expensive network re-deployments.  

This separation of software from hardware is a significant first step forward for the communications industry that creates new ways to manage the network elements. Now, an open market for best-of-breed hardware is possible, which could drive down costs. Also possible is the encapsulation of software elements as “virtualized network functions” (VNFs), which allows CSPs to manage software lifecycle management separately so that upgrades and enhancements do not affect the hardware environment (except in the event of rare scaling and performance dependencies).

NFV is moving network technology in the right direction, and in many ways, it’s similar to the revolution of cloud computing in IT. And also like cloud computing, now that the deployment model has been revolutionized, the next step in NFV is to free up the hold on software functions. Specifically, NFV has matured to the point where CSPs can deploy on any suitable best of breed hardware. Now it’s time for CSPs to have more choices to deploy best of breed software on that hardware to build the best possible network.
   
But here is the fly in the ointment, or, the “same old baggage.” While hardware components are interoperable, the network software components were never designed to be interoperable.

Same Old Baggage

For NFV software, interoperability is required on two levels: 1) between VNFs and 2) between Management and Network Orchestrators (MANOs) and the VNFs. Regardless of NFV, the same old baggage comes from taking existing network functions that do not interoperate and virtualizing them into VNFs—you still have network functions that do not interoperate. In many ways, NFV is compounding the problem, because currently there aren’t agreed-upon standards between the MANO and VNF. As a result, the various suppliers are creating the best interface for just the NFV products they own.

If this situation sounds familiar, it probably is: the problem of NFV interoperability is not new. And there have already been several attempts to create hard standards for network functions to fix it—TINA-C, JAIN, PARLAY, OneAPI. Each made a valiant effort at standardization, yet did not fully achieve software interoperability in the communications network. Now, the NFV community is pursuing interoperability with an open sourced approach—that is, creating an open source reference implementation model for NFV and hoping that the network equipment providers will follow. This open source model has had some success in the IT industry—think Apache Foundation, Linux, and GNU. And for the communications industry, projects like OPNFV, Open Daylight, ONF, Open Stack, and Open vSwitch offer an approach that would move the industry to a common software model, but without requiring NFV vendors to comply with a standard.

The original NFV whitepaper makes it clear that many of the largest and most influential CSPs want to allow VNFs to proliferate in an open market where network providers may mix, match, buy, and deploy best of breed VNFs that would automatically connect and run their networks. But to make this objective a reality, full interoperability between VNFs and MANOs is required. So what is the best way for the industry to move forward from this stalemate?

NFV: Path to Software Interoperability 

To overcome these obstacles and achieve the full potential of NFV, the industry should consider not just one solution, but rather an integrated and multi-step path to jumpstart the VNF market from a premise to a promise with a real plan. Here are a few things that the industry should consider:

  • Assemble a policing agency or an interoperability group that tests or runs the software and generates compliance reports.  As discussed, one of the major roadblocks to reaching NFV’s potential is that there is very little standardization enforcement across the communications industry. A standards body or policing agency could help by validating that vendors’ products and solutions meet defined specifications required to call themselves “certified NFV suppliers”—and therefore deemed trustworthy by customers.
  • Continue with the open source community offerings.  Although the open source communities do not have a charter to enforce interoperability, CSPs may use the reference implementation the communities produce as a model or means to test the VNFs. 
  • Define a standard API for VNFs.  While this approach does not completely solve the interoperability issues and does not enforce the standard between the VNFs into the MANO, it would provide a universal programming interface for all VNFs. VNF providers could produce their products despite not having their own MANO product.
  • Define a standard protocol that the industry could adopt as a universal standard, or that at least would be enforceable via something like the Java Community Process. This would enable   CSPs to compare vendors, supporting a fair and free market—CSPs could buy the best product for their company without fear that the vendor is violating standards.
  • Provide an interface framework in the VNF manager.  In the absence of hard protocol standards, another way to accelerate the adoption of NFV is a VNF plugin framework. This would allow VNF suppliers to build and test executable plugins that interface with their products, yet run within the VNF manager—promoting technical interoperability between the VNF manager and the VNF, while opening the market for suppliers to work together. While a plugin framework does not solve the problem of interoperability between VNFs, VNF managers and various VNF suppliers would be able to rapidly integrate their products. And, when the industry finally advances and produces a standard, the only update required is the plugin; the VNF manager and the VNFs would require little change.  

If the industry can develop standards against which vendors can build NFV solutions, and employ a policing body to enforce these standards, VNF interoperability will move forward—driving unprecedented innovation to bring new services and new revenue streams to market quickly, with much lower risk. But the industry must continue to move forward in the meantime. So it must take action now to enable industry players to work together, promoting a culture of openness and innovation.

About the Author

Doug Tait is director of product marketing, Oracle Communications.

Got an idea for a Blueprint column?  We welcome your ideas on next gen network architecture.
See our guidelines.

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

MEF aims to define the future of Lifecycle Service Orchestration – Part 1

by Bartosz Michalik of Amartus

MEF is an industry body that, besides other activities, defines the LSO capabilities and APIs to automate the entire service lifecycle in a sustainable fashion. This activity will allow service providers to attain coordinated management and control across all network domains responsible for delivering end to end connectivity services. In order to enable that coordinated management and ensure efficient communication within networks, MEF has defined the reference architecture. In short, this architecture comprises functional blocks and 'LSO Reference Points'. Reference Points are the logical points of interaction between specific functional management components, such as business applications, service orchestration functions (SOF), or infrastructure management and control applications (ICM). The Presto Management Interface Reference Point is the 'north-south' interface for network resource provisioning that sits between the SOF and ICM, and according to MEF 55 (https://wiki.mef.net/display/CESG/LSO+Presto), it is "needed to manage the network infrastructure, including network and topology view related management functions".



Currently, the LSO Presto API efforts are spearheaded by CenturyLink, with active contributions from Amartus, Ciena, Cisco, Ericsson, Infinera and NEC.

Industry-wide Collaboration Accelerates Realization of the Third Network Vision

Last year, MEF began the process of specifying the industry standard to accelerate the adoption of orchestrated network services. Enabling and assuring Third Network services across multiple provider networks calls for an industry-wide collaboration because of the involved level of complexity. In order to facilitate that cooperation and complement the work of its Technical and Operations Committee, MEF has come forward with a number of initiatives.

What emerged from that work was a plan to support and validate the work around MEF standards and LSO architecture by delivering open and close source reference implementations that realize the ideas defined in MEF 55 specification, outlining the LSO Reference Architecture and Framework. MEF has launched a series of initiatives that allow the in-network validation of Lifecycle Service Orchestration data models and interfaces. The current effort of the working groups is streamlined under the umbrella terms of Open Lifecycle Service Orchestration (OpenLSO) and Open Connectivity Services (OpenCS) ecosystems.



OpenLSO is focused on the implementation of functions and APIs specific for service orchestration functionality (SOF). It primarily targets service providers who are accelerating their adoption of LSO to enjoy all benefits of end to end service orchestration over standard MEF services. OpenCS focuses on Presto NRP, which is an LSO interface reference point (IRP) specific for infrastructure and control management (ICM). OpenCS provides reference implementations of connectivity services using combinations of open and close source software, open hardware, SDN, NFV and Carrier Ethernet (CE) 2.0-certified devices. To leverage these technologies, MEF develops this work stream in close cooperation with open source projects such as ON.Lab, OpenDaylight and OPNFV. This ecosystem should be of interest to those service providers that are adopting SDN and NFV to deliver MEF-defined connectivity services.

About the author

Bartosz Michalik is a Software Architect at Amartus, a Certified MEF Engineer, and a holder of the MEF Recognition Award for LSO Hackathon blogging and facilitation. He leads the LSO Presto Hackathon project, and co-leads the OpenCS Packet WAN project together with Donald Hunter from Cisco. He is also a contributor to the Open Daylight UniMgr project. E-mail me at a Bartosz.Michalik@amartus.com with any questions or queries.

(NB: Further information about MEF's Third Network Vision and Lifecycle Service Orchestration is available here: https://www.mef.net/third-network/lifecycle-service-orchestration)

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

MPLS-TP OpenFlow extensions approved

ZTE announced that the 'MPLS-TP OpenFlow Protocol Extensions for SPTN' (ONF TS-029) technical document proposed by China Mobile has become a formal standard of the ONF (Open Networking Foundation) after receiving unanimous approval from the forum's board of directors.

The release of MPLS-TP OpenFlow Protocol Extensions for SPTN is intended to provide a foundation for interworking between devices from heterogeneous vendors, and between devices and controllers. ZTE noted that China Mobile's large-scale deployment of software-defined packet transport network (SPTN) devices provides an example for other operators, while five operators are believed to be planning to implement the standard in the near future.

ZTE stated that packet transport network (PTN) technology features separate forwarding/control and a centralised management architecture, while OpenFlow offers an open protocol that performs programmable control for flow tables on the forwarding plane. In addition, an abstract adaptation layer supporting OpenFlow to encapsulate the existing forwarding functions of PTN is intended to provide an efficient means of enabling PTN devices with open and software-defined features.

Additionally, this design is expected to facilitate the commercialisation of PTN devices supporting SDN and thereby accelerate the development of the SPTN supply chain.

It was noted that China Mobile has a longstanding commitment to SPTN technology, in mid-2015, working with ZTE, Broadcom and Microsemi, establishing a discussion group within the ONF to research device specifications for SPTN based on OpenFlow and table type pattern (TTP).

In November 2015, a first ONF draft was proposed based on SPTN TTP that extended flow tables, group tables and related fields supporting MPLS-TP, expanded the OF-Config protocol to support QOS, OAM, protection and alarm performance configuration, and leveraged local OAM processing units to ensure a 50 ms protection switching time.

In tandem with the draft specification, China Mobile also organised lab tests for SPTN devices complying with the specifications and amended the document in accordance with the test results. The draft document was subsequently passed for review by experts from a number of ONF technical groups and adopted as a formal standard.

ZTE stated that MPLS-TP OpenFlow Protocol Extensions for SPTN standard is supported by the SPTN industrial supply chain, including chip manufacturers Broadcom, Microsemi, Centec and Marvell, equipment providers ZTE, Ericsson, Fiberhome, Raisecom, Greenwell, Chuling and Huahuan, instrument manufacturer Spirent and open source software Open Daylight and ONOS.

To date it is estimated that more than 50 operators have deployed MPLS-TP-based PTN devices at scale, including China Mobile, which purchased around 590,000 group customer devices compliant with the SPTN TTP standard in 2016. In addition, six equipment vendors have worked with China Mobile to deploy the networks.


Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Video interview with Cisco: What is OpFlex?

In this video, Tom Edsall, CTO of the Insieme business unit at Cisco, introduces OpFlex, a new policy protocol designed to support physical and virtual switching infrastructure.  OpFlex
provides an abstraction that Cisco believes is better suited than OpenFlow is scaling out policy.

Cisco has published an OpFlex draft in the IETF and will be releasing an OVS implementation in the public domain as well as a controller in the Open Daylight consortium.  The company hopes that open APIs will enable more equipment to be brought in under the OpFlex policy umbrella.  OpFlex fits in with Cisco's Application Centric Infrastructure vision.  Edsall describes differences between the imperative control plane model of "traditional SDN" and the declarative control plane of its ACI model, saying that some things should be centralized while others are best to be distributed.

See 3-minute video:  http://youtu.be/Q4riPf2fgaQ



http://www.cisco.com


In April, Cisco introduced OpFlex - a new networking protocol designed to open up its vision of Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) in the data center for automated applications and interoperability with other software-defined networking (SDN) elements.


OpFlex is a southbound protocol that is co-authored by Citrix, IBM, Microsoft, and Sungard Availability Services. It provides a mechanism that enables a network controller to transfer abstract policy to a set of “smart” devices capable of directly rendering rich network policy on the device.  OpFlex will enable leading hypervisors, switches and network services (layer 4-layer 7) to self-configure driven by application policy.

Cisco is submitting to the IETF for standardization. It is also an open source Contribution that Cisco is making to OpenDaylight in partnership with IBM, Plexxi and Midokura.  Other companies that are supporting OpFlex include Microsoft, RedHat, F5, Citrix, Canonical, and Embrane.  Hypervisor and software vendors will support OpFlex-enabled virtual switches and extend the Cisco ACI policy framework in their virtual environments. Network services vendors like Avi Networks, Citrix, Embrane, and F5 Networks will be shipping an OpFlex agent with their appliances.

In addition, Cisco is working with OpenDaylight to create a 100 percent open source, ACI-compatible policy model and OpFlex reference architecture.

Compared to the current SDN model, Cisco said its Application Centric Infrastructure avoids the scalability/resiliency challenge of having a single SDN controller managing the state of the network. Its ACI approach is to distribute complexity to the edges and operate disconnected from a central policy manager.  It also would not require application developers to describe their requirements with low level constructs.

Cisco is planning to support the OpFlex Protocol on the following Cisco products:
  • Cisco Application Centric Infrastructure, Nexus 9000 Series
  • Cisco Nexus 1000V
  • Cisco ASR 9000 Series
  • Cisco Nexus 7000 Series
  • Cisco ASA
  • Cisco SourceFire

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

China Mobile Joins Open Daylight Project

China Mobile Communications Corporation (CMCC) has joined the OpenDaylight project at the Silver level.

Recently, China Mobile released its commercial OpenDaylight-based datacenter SDN controller named “AERO,” currently in trial, and believed to be the first datacenter SDN controller developed by a telecom operator based in China, according to the company and the Linux Foundation. Additionally, CMCC initiated the “SPTN” project within OpenDaylight, which evolves the packet transport network (PTN) toward SDN.

China Mobile joins Tencent and Alibaba, also members of OpenDaylight, as part of a growing number of Chinese internet and communications companies that actively participate in open networking projects and leverage open source SDN to support their extreme scalability demands.

“I am pleased to see the OpenDaylight community growing so rapidly and on such a global scale,” said Neela Jacques, executive director of the OpenDaylight project. “China Mobile’s expanding contributions are beneficial to the OpenDaylight community, and their involvement is yet another example of the innovation happening in the Chinese market today. As Chinese telcos, enterprises and equipment manufacturers embrace open source, they’re enabling new solutions at a breathtaking pace.”

https://www.opendaylight.org

Friday, July 31, 2015

Open source ensures no vendor lock-in, says Cisco' Gee Rittenhouse


Open source is critical to everything that we do, says Gee Rittenhouse, Senior VP and General Manager of Cisco's Cloud and Virtualization Group.

Three aspects of open source really stand out: first, it ensures that there is no vendor lock-in; second, it accelerates time-to-market; and third, it enables ecosystem communities to emerge.  Cisco believes Open Daylight fits into this process at the controller layer.


Thursday, September 18, 2014

Telefónica Tests Cisco's Evolved Programmable Network

Cisco and Telefónica announced a collaboration focused on converged IP and optical networks. Specifically, Telefónica will be testing the Cisco Open Network Architecture, comprised of the Evolved Services Platform (ESP) and Evolved Programmable Network (EPN), which combine both hardware and software.  These capabilities include virtual network functions, software-defined networking (SDN) and advanced orchestration.

Some key points of the agreement:

  • Over the next two years, Cisco and Telefónica will be jointly using the Cisco WAN Automation Engine software, which automates and optimizes the engineering of the WAN network, provisioning flexible SLAs (Service Level Agreements) and ultimately, creating a better user experience.  
  • Telefónica and Cisco will collaborate on different use cases extracted from the Telefónica network topology, including multilayer restoration, the creation of a multidomain route and a multilevel by-pass, all of this with a multi-vendor approach in order to guarantee compatibility between products from different manufacturers.
     
  • The tests will be based on various hardware solutions from Cisco and other vendors that are widely used in the market. Cisco gears included such as Cisco CRS Series routers and transport platform Cisco Network Convergence System 2000.
     
  • The testing platform with also be using Cisco nLight, which is multilayer control technology (GMPLS, Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching) facilitating the exchange of information between the IP and optical layers to optimize operations and maximize the benefits of a convergent transport network.
     
  • Telefónica will be validating models which help minimize investment cost (by means of redundant and underutilized resources) and to achieve a unified network architecture that is more efficient, less complex and easier to upscale, downscale and operate, enabling it to obtain significant savings in operating and capital costs.

 "Architectural approaches based on network layers that are constructed and run independently generate inefficiencies of scale, provision and operation that must be resolved as soon as possible. What we need is an innovative focus capable of creating an optimally convergent transport infrastructure, and that's what we, along with Telefónica, are trying to provide leveraging SDN technology benefits,” stated Bill Gartner, Vice President of Optical Networking Group at Cisco.

http://pressoffice.telefonica.com/
http://www.cisco.com


In February 2014, Cisco introduced an Evolved Services Platform (ESP) for Service Providers that leverages its software-defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV) offerings.

The Cisco ESP is a unified virtualization and orchestration software platform that creates, automates and provisions services in real time, across compute, storage and network functions, to deliver desired business outcomes for applications running across multiple domains.

Cisco said the primary characteristics of this virtualization and orchestration software platform are:

  • Open: Cisco ESP is multi-vendor and based on open standards and incorporating Openstack and Open Daylight (SDN) protocol suite, it is fully compliant with ETSI NFV MANO, 3GPP and more. With interoperation of third-party software, Cisco ESP works with Cisco’s virtual functions and with other vendors’ functions and applications such as Metaswitch Networks and Openwave Mobility.
  • Extensible: Cisco ESP offers the most comprehensive broad set of capabilities with more on the way and spanning across the entire service provider architecture – cloud, video, mobile and fixed – to provide service providers greater means to optimize their networks or create, automate the creation of new services as the business needs dictate.
  • Elastic: Cisco ESP allows service providers to seamlessly and dynamically scale their existing services while also dramatically accelerating deployment of new services and network functions. Resources are harnessed in an automated way when and where they are needed to enable providers deliver “On Demand” offerings at web speed.

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Comcast and Lenovo Join Open Daylight Project

Comcast and Lenovo have joined The OpenDaylight Project to support the development of an open, common SDN and NFV platform to enable network automation and programmability.

“We’re seeing more end users starting to adopt OpenDaylight and participate in its development as the community sharpens its focus on stability, scalability, security and performance,” said Neela Jacques, executive director, OpenDaylight. “Comcast has been testing ODL and working with our community since launch and the team at Lenovo were heavily involved in ODL’s foundation through their roots at IBM. Our members see the long-term value of creating a rich ecosystem around open systems and OpenDaylight.”

http://www.opendaylight.org/

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Cisco Boosts its Evolved Programmable Network

Cisco unveiled three enhancements for its Evolved Programmable Network (EPN) framework for service providers:

Cisco Application Engineered Routing - an agile service-creation environment that combines open, standards-based Segment Routing with software-defined-networking (SDN). Cisco said its solution drives new levels of programmability, allowing service providers to reduce operational costs and drive incremental revenue with on-demand latency, bandwidth and availability capabilities.

Cisco IOS XRv 9000 Virtual Router - operates on x86-based hardware for on demand, cost optimized service deployment and complements the existing Cisco Cloud Services Routers (CSR1000v) targeted at the enterprise and managed services markets. The IOS XRv adds to the nearly 50 virtual network functions (VNFs) currently supported by Cisco. Availability expected in Q2.

High-density 100GE line cards for the Cisco ASR 9000 Series - available in both four- and eight-port versions. The new 100GE cards support Cisco silicon photonic CPAK technology and enable each 100GE port to be configured as 100GE, 40GE, or 10x10GE based on customer requirements.


http://newsroom.cisco.com/press-release-content?type=webcontent&articleId=1611303


The Cisco Evolved Services Platform (ESP) for Service Providers is a unified virtualization and orchestration software platform that creates, automates and provisions services in real time, across compute, storage and network functions, to deliver desired business outcomes for applications running across multiple domains. Cisco says  ESP is multi-vendor and based on open standards and incorporating Openstack and Open Daylight (SDN) protocol suite, it is fully compliant with ETSI NFV MANO, 3GPP, etc.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Compass-EOS Introduces SDN Forwarding Plane

Compass-EOS introduces its SDN Forwarding Plane, a new networking element that aims to replace expensive and complex routers used in service provider networks.

The Compass-EOS said key attributes of its SDN Forwarding Plane include:

  • A scalable, high-capacity, low-latency, programmable secure packet forwarding  platform
  • Support for SDN/NFV-based open-standard protocol
  • The Compass-EOS AnyFLOW Architecture, a unique, hybrid SDN architecture that combines network topology resolution and packet forwarding on multiple levels
  • Compass-EOS icPhotonics technology for scalability and low-latency

Compass-EOS has also joined the Open Daylight open-source SDN community and is planning to contribute code and expertise for WAN-centric SDN applications.

Compass-EOS also disclosed a new chip on its product roadmap that will enable its routers and SDN Forwarding Plane solution to grow from its current total capacity of 1.34 Terabits/sec to higher than 10 Terabits/sec.

“With the world’s first commercial technology combining high-capacity inter-chip optical interconnect and digital processing in the same silicon chip, Compass-EOS’ icPhotonics™ technology gives us the unique opportunity to completely transform the  information and communications technology industry as we know it, unleashing a new generation of devices and innovation that disrupts the current network equipment paradigm," said Matt Bross, Compass-EOS Chairman and CEO.

“This gives birth to a new network element – an SDN Forwarding Plane that takes its instructions from processes in the cloud and defines in detail what each flow in the plane is doing in a packet-by-packet basis,” Bross continued. “This type of technology capability simply doesn’t exist in legacy platforms. The SDN Forwarding Plane is more powerful yet less complex and power hungry. More importantly, it can also incrementally scale through the simple addition of more devices, just like servers are used to scale data centers today.”

http://compass-eos.com/

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Cisco Expands its Service Provider Virtualization Platform

Cisco introduced an Evolved Services Platform (ESP) for Service Providers that leverages its software-defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV) offerings.

The Cisco ESP is a unified virtualization and orchestration software platform that creates, automates and provisions services in real time, across compute, storage and network functions, to deliver desired business outcomes for applications running across multiple domains.

Cisco said the primary characteristics of this virtualization and orchestration software platform are:

  • Open: Cisco ESP is multi-vendor and based on open standards and incorporating Openstack and Open Daylight (SDN) protocol suite, it is fully compliant with ETSI NFV MANO, 3GPP and more. With interoperation of third-party software, Cisco ESP works with Cisco’s virtual functions and with other vendors’ functions and applications such as Metaswitch Networks and Openwave Mobility.
  • Extensible: Cisco ESP offers the most comprehensive broad set of capabilities with more on the way and spanning across the entire service provider architecture – cloud, video, mobile and fixed – to provide service providers greater means to optimize their networks or create, automate the creation of new services as the business needs dictate.
  • Elastic: Cisco ESP allows service providers to seamlessly and dynamically scale their existing services while also dramatically accelerating deployment of new services and network functions. Resources are harnessed in an automated way when and where they are needed to enable providers deliver “On Demand” offerings at web speed.

As part of this ESP framework, Cisco is announcing the the first two modules:

  • Video: Cisco Videoscape Cloud DVR Solution – cloud-driven video recording with capture and storage in the cloud instead of the end device. Consumers can restart shows, catch up on past programs, and play back digital video recorder-captured content from anywhere, on any screen. For the service provider, it enables new multi-screen offers. It is currently deployed in a major North American video operator.
  • Mobility: Cisco Virtualized Mobile Internet – New virtualized mobile services, such as sponsored data, where the content provider pays to deliver data to the user, provide new revenue opportunities for service providers. Such capabilities are now possible in an even broader use case with the introduction of the Cisco Quantum Virtualized Packet Core (vPC), the Cisco Virtual Gi-LAN capabilities and the Cisco Quantum Services Bus. It is currently in trials at China Mobile as well as other service providers.


Significantly, Cisco will sell these SDN + NFV solutions in four ways:

Virtual Functions: Individual virtual functions may be purchased independently as a separate module and run in a network over general computing (e.g., hardware independent and hypervisor independent).

Orchestrated: Virtualized functions and orchestration, which enables the benefits of the all the different capabilities to work in a “networked” or “service chaining” approach  to deliver expanded functionality and address even wider market opportunities.

Pod: Virtualized service functions combined with orchestration and a hardware package -- implementation in a Pod approach -- Cisco leads the deployment of the Cisco ESP and offers service level agreements and guaranteed performance, working atop of Cisco infrastructure and including Cisco integration consulting services.

“As a Service”: A model where complete service offers that include virtualized service functions combined with orchestration and delivered through a hosted or third-party cloud for faster time-to-market, using a pay-as-you-go model.

“Service providers success is dependent on providing a consistent experience, agility to roll out new services and the ease at which these services can be ordered, automated, managed and delivered,” said Pankaj Patel, executive vice president and chief development officer, Cisco. “Service providers globally view virtualization not just to reduce costs but to have it work with their infrastructure to provide even greater value by means of increased agility and elasticity. As the industry leader in networking, we are not only committed to but executing on our strategy to enable our customers through this transition.”

http://www.cisco.com

In January, as part of its recently launched Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) initiative, Cisco introduced an Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) Enterprise Module for extending high-performing applications from the data center to wide-area networks (WAN) and local access networks (LAN). The goal is to provide enterprises with complete visibility into their networks, automating network and policy configuration while managing applications across the WAN and access networks.

The Cisco APIC serves as the single point of automation and fabric element management in
both physical and virtual environments.

The Cisco APIC Enterprise Module is constructed of three elements: a consolidated network information database, policy infrastructure and automation.

To address security concerns, Cisco APIC automates network-wide rapid threat detection and mitigation by integrating and automating Cisco Sourcefire  security solutions.  For compliance management across branches and headquarters, Cisco APIC also provides network-wide Quality of Service (QoS), and accelerates Intelligent WAN (IWAN) deployments. It can also be used with third-party solutions to provide an end-to-end WAN orchestration and management.

Monday, April 15, 2013

An Update from the Open Networking Foundation


Click here to view video:  http://youtu.be/uO9zYdNFGXE

In this interview, Dan Pitt, Executive Director of the Open Networking Foundation, provides a progress report, including:

1:00 - Technical Objectives for ONF in the coming year
2:33 - Adapting OpenFlow for OA&M
3:07 - A new working group for Optical Transport
3:41 - Addressing OpenFlow security
4:10 - Commercial deployments
5:22 - Strengthening the hardware supply chain
6:18 - The ONF Research Associates program
7:18 - Defining a Framework for Services
7:59 - ETSI's Network Functions Virtualization Effort
8:38 - Working with the Open Daylight Project

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

MEF aims to define the future of Lifecycle Service Orchestration – Part 2

link to part 1 of this article

by Bartosz Michalik of Amartus

OpenCS Packet WAN project advances development of LSO

Together with Donald Hunter from Cisco, I have the privilege of co-leading the OpenCS Packet WAN project, which is one of the seven initiatives started in OpenCS ecosystem. The aim of the project is to deliver a reference implementation of an SDN controller that manages multi-vendor networks. The northbound API was released as a part of Presto SDK, which, in its current version, focuses on Presto network resources provisioning (NRP) models. Packet WAN is an open source module of the OpenDaylight controller called Unimgr. But, before I delve into the project details, let me take you on a journey through how we got to this stage of the development.

LSO hackathons throwback

The LSO development effort started in Dallas, in November 2015, during the first LSO Hackathon that was co-located with MEF’s GEN15 conference. At the time, I joined one of the Hackathon teams as a regular participant, and together with 40+ other colleagues from various vendor and provider companies, we were experimenting with the first ideas around Presto API. This experience had a great influence upon me, and it turned out to be extremely productive in terms of the LSO development. As I already mentioned at the beginning of this article, soon after the Hackathon I summarized the work of our team and presented it in this guest blog post at SDxCentral.

Since that first Hackathon, MEF organised three successful meetings in Rome, Baltimore and Frankfurt that saw developers, engineers and networking experts from MEF member and non-member companies invest their exceptional skills in LSO evolution. For a recap of the last Frankfurt Euro17 Hackathon, please go to this blog post by Charles Eckel, an Open Source Developer Evangelist at Cisco. At the consecutive Hackathons, we were crowded in a confined space and turning coffee, sweets and brainpower into Presto, Legato and Sonata LSO building blocks code. In parallel, on the official level, OpenCS and OpenLSO were launched, and the Hackathon teams could start remote collaboration on a daily basis.

To facilitate continuous development, MEF has built MEFnet, a compute-storage-networking platform, which delivers technical facilities for the Third Network reference implementations, OpenLSO and OpenCS projects, and gives interested parties an ability to evaluate APIs using reference implementations deployed to the MEFnet cloud.

Recently, we have implemented agile methodologies with the aim to iteratively deliver APIs, their reference implementations, and other artifacts that, when they are combined, will become LSO IRP SDK. And only a few months ago MEF initiated yet another program to welcome contributions from academia – namely MEF Software Developer Community. The idea is to give researchers and students an opportunity to participate in the development of Lifecycle Service Orchestration. The next edition of the LSO Hackathon is coming this fall to Orlando, co-located with MEF17. Check out this MEF17 link for more details and information on participation. All hands on deck!

What Is OpenDaylight Unimgr plug-in?

So, to return to 'my' Hackathon project. OpenCS Packet WAN is a project that delivers orchestration of MEF CE 2.0 services with SDN OpenDaylight controllers in combination with CE 2.0 networking devices. It has been developed as an OpenDaylight Unimgr module. For the current implementation, we use the ODL controller similarly as we did at the first Hackathon when we were experimenting with some ad-hoc Presto NRP ideas: https://wiki.opendaylight.org/view/Unimgr:Main.

However, the model itself has evolved a great deal - from the prototype, via the ONF Core model-based data model to ONF Transport API (T-API). We have also been working on improving the architecture of the solution and adjusting it to the model changes.

Unimgr is a platform that focuses on the Presto NRP-compliant network resource activation API and is a good starting point to making a network LSO-compliant. The most important concept in our Presto implementation is a driver that encapsulates protocol- and vendor-specific logic to make a sub-segment activation possible. What it means is that networks built using Cisco and/or Juniper devices, can be using two different drivers to manage these types of devices. In addition, a driver is required to contribute an abstract representation of managed devices to the Unimgr topology. Why? Because an NBI client (e.g. Service Orchestration Functionality – SOF) needs to know the current state of the network to be able to trigger resource activation requests.

To support other network vendors, there are three drivers being maintain – Cisco XR driver for MPLS, OVSDB driver for SDN-like networks, and a dummy driver, which can act as a template and requires a minimal amount of code to meet a Unimgr driver contract. Once the driver is installed, then Unimgr middleware will begin handling the RPC requests, decomposing them and triggering requests to the registered drivers if needed.

The Unimgr development plan is aligned with MEF SDK effort and OpenCS planning. In fact, the second iteration of OpenCS is about to be delivered as a part of the ODL Nitrogen release. Some of the new features include:

•   The implementation of the latest Presto NRP.

•   Support for P2P connection over multiple drivers.

•   Support for dynamic bandwidth changes in the drivers that we host in the project.

In addition, a simple implementation of MEF LSO Legato will also be delivered for the scenarios in which a fully-featured SOF (e.g. for a lab/experimental network) is not needed.

The future for the LSO ecosystem

The LSO ecosystem is dynamic and fast growing which means the future of LSO is very bright. However, it is important to continually grow this ecosystems, which means encouraging engineers and coders from more companies to join the upcoming meetings and hackathons. The next big LSO hackathon is in Orlando, FL, 13-16th November during the MEF17 show.

About the Author

Bartosz Michalik is a Software Architect at Amartus, a Certified MEF Engineer, and a holder of the MEF Recognition Award for LSO Hackathon blogging and facilitation. He leads the LSO Presto Hackathon project, and co-leads the OpenCS Packet WAN project together with Donald Hunter from Cisco. He is also a contributor to the Open Daylight UniMgr project. E-mail me at a Bartosz.Michalik@amartus.com with any questions or queries.

(More information about MEF’s Third Network Vision and Lifecycle Service Orchestration is available here: https://www.mef.net/third-network/lifecycle-service-orchestration)

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Key Themes for this Year's Open Networking Summit



See video: https://youtu.be/eEqhbmAza90

Ram Appalaraju previews key themes at next week's #ONS2015 in Santa Clara, California.

The range of technologies on display will include OpenFlow, OpenStack, Open Daylight, OPNFV, ONOS, as well as vendor-specific offerings such as Cisco's ACI and VMware's NSX.

http://opennetsummit.org/




Sunday, November 22, 2015

GEN15: Business Ethernet Enabling Advanced Services

by James E. Carroll

The outlook for Carrier Ethernet is very robust, according leading U.S. service providers at last week's GEN15 event in Dallas.  Vertical Systems Group is forecasting that by 2020 there will be over four million ports installed worldwide, of which approximately 1.3 million ports are expected to be in the U.S.  This build-out of Carrier Ethernet infrastructure is further expected to become the platform NFV-driven advanced services. The GEN15 event focused onenabling the future of agile, assured, and orchestrated services that are powered by CE 2.0, LSO (Lifecycle Service Orchestration), SDN, and NFV.

In a keynote at GEN15, Josh Goodell, VP of AT&T's Network on Demand, said its platform is already in 170 markets across of the country. Ethernet on Demand is the first service, to be followed shortly by a Managed Internet on Demand service.

Some notes from GEN15:
  • The MEF continues to focus on Carrier Ethernet 2.0
  • MEF reports growing intereset in its Lifecycle Service Orchestration (LSO) initiative.  Work on LSO has shifted from high-level architecture to developing API components.
  • Industry collaboration toward the globalization of CE 2.0 and the MEF's Third Network vision is growing
  • The Ethernet Interconnect Points (IEP) Project will link CE 2.0 networks using ENNIs, the foundation for LSO
  • MEF Certification Programs for Service Providers and for Equipment vendors have continued to expand
  • The first 100G CE 2.0 certications have been awarded to Alcatel-Lucent, Ciena, Cisco, Coriant, Huawei, and Infinera. The 100G CE 2.0 testing and certification was performed by Iometrix
  • The MEF has collaboration projects underway with ATIS, ETSI, IEEE, IETF, ITU, Open Daylight, OpenCloud Connect, OPNFV, ONF, and tmforum.
  • RAD, Sandvine, and CenturyLink conducted a joint Proof of Concept (PoC) demonstration of application-aware service level agreement networking solutions.  This showed Service Assured Access and Cloud Services Policy Controller in an application-aware networking architecture.
  • PCCW Global has selected CENX’s Cortx Service Orchestrator to enhance elements in its VPN and cloud offerings that will facilitate self-serve, on-demand connectivity. Using an on-line portal, integrated to PCCW Global’s OSS and BSS environments, customers can dynamically scale their bandwidth connectivity and cloud data center resources. 
  • Wedge Networks, which supplies orchestrated threat management solutions, named James Hamilton as its new CEO. Hamilton previously was CEO of TippingPoint, the company that defined Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS) and that was acquired for $430 million by 3Com, where he stayed on and continued to lead the TippingPoint line of business.
  • Cylance, a start-up applying artificial intelligence, algorithmic science and machine learning to cyber security, announced that Dell will integrated its technology into Dell Data Security solutions.  This collaboration builds on the Dell Ventures investment in Cylance earlier this year.
  • GEN15 was hosted at the Omni Hotel in Dallas and attracted  about 1,000 registered attendees from 280+ organizations based in 35 countries. GEN15’s 55 sponsors included Host Operator Sponsor AT&T, Platinum Sponsors Comcast Business, Cox Business, PCCW Global, Verizon, Ciena, and dozens of other service, technology, and test companies.


Filmed at GEN15 in Dallas, Texas.























 

 



 

 
'

See also