Showing posts with label Wireless. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Wireless. Show all posts

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Researchers at Brown University Test Terahertz Wireless Transmission

Researchers at Brown University achieved wireless throughput of 50 Gbps when transmitting video signals through a terahertz multiplexer. Results of the experiment were published in Nature Communications. Signals propagated as directional beams.

"We showed that we can transmit separate data streams on terahertz waves at very high speeds and with very low error rates,” said Daniel Mittleman, a professor in Brown’s School of Engineering and the paper’s corresponding author. “This is the first time anybody has characterized a terahertz multiplexing system using actual data, and our results show that our approach could be viable in future terahertz wireless networks.”

Backers of the research include the U.S. National Science Foundation, the U.S. Army Research Office, the W.M. Keck Foundation and France’s Agence Nationale de la Recherche under the COM’TONIQ and TERALINKS research grants.

http://news.brown.edu/articles/2017/08/multiplexer


Saturday, January 23, 2016

Kumu Raises $25 Million for Full Duplex Wireless

Kumu Networks, a start-up based in Sunnyvale, California, raised $25 million in series C funding for its full-duplex wireless technology.

Kumu enables a radio to simultaneously transmit and receive overlapping signals using a single frequency channel.  It accomplishes this using self-interference cancellation technology.

The new round was led by Cisco with participation from Verizon Ventures and Deutsche Telekom. Existing investors include NEA, Third Point Ventures and Khosla Ventures.

http://kumunetworks.com/

Kumu Networks: Opening the Door to Full Duplex Wireless


Born out of a class project at Stanford University, Kumu Networks is commercializing self-interference technology and full-duplex wireless. In this video, co-founder Steven Hong explains how radio self-interference has been a problem since the earliest days of wireless communications. The Kumu approach is the first to cancel out this interference by subtracting the transmitter's signal from its own receiver.

Kumu Networks, backed by top venture firms in Silicon Valley, now aims to apply its technology to applications such as small cell backhaul. In field testing, Kumu significantly boosts spectral efficiency.

See video:  http://youtu.be/VeKU5jD7i-8

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Wednesday, December 24, 2014

NJIT: The Evolution of Wireless Networks

The New Jersey Institute of Technology’s online Master of Science in Electrical Engineering program has created an infographic that traces the development of wireless technology from Gugliemo Marconi's wireless telegraph in the 1890s to the emergence of 4G technologies, followed by predictions for the coming decades.

http://electricalengineering.online.njit.edu/resources/infographics/the-evolution-of-wireless-networks/


New Jersey Institute of Technology’s Online Master of Science in Electrical Engineering


Sunday, June 22, 2014

Kumu Networks: Opening the Door to Full Duplex Wireless

Born out of a class project at Stanford University, Kumu Networks is commercializing self-interference technology and full-duplex wireless. In this video, co-founder Steven Hong explains how radio self-interference has been a problem since the earliest days of wireless communications. The Kumu approach is the first to cancel out this interference by subtracting the transmitter's signal from its own receiver.

Kumu Networks, backed by top venture firms in Silicon Valley, now aims to apply its technology to applications such as small cell backhaul. In field testing, Kumu significantly boosts spectral efficiency.

See video:  http://youtu.be/VeKU5jD7i-8


Friday, December 6, 2013

Nextivity Enhances its Small Cell Signal Boosters with New Processor

Nextivity, a start-up based in San Diego, introduced "ARES", its third generation Cel-Fi Baseband Processor for the indoor wireless coverage market.

ARES is a multi-core RISC processor that will power the next generation of Nextivity’s flagship digital Cel-Fi Smart Signal Boosters. The new processor adds support for LTE devices on LTE networks to deliver optimal indoor signal quality.

Nextivity said its ARES processor also increases the amount of bandwidth operators can boost, giving mobile operators the flexibility to meet the varying needs of both consumer and enterprise customers. The built-in intelligence of the ARES processor also enables automatic configuration for HSPA and LTE networks.

Additional features and functionalities include:

  • Multi-tap, ultra-fast adapting frequency-domain Echo Cancellation – ARES is designed to cope with highly dynamic LTE signaling environments.
  • Signal equalization – Complex, software programmable equalization filters allow for optimization of signal quality under varying radio conditions.
  • Ultra-fast gain control – Dedicated RISC processors enable ultra-fast gain adjustment to help ensure unconditional, network-safe operations.
  • Self-Organizing Networking (SON) capability – A dedicated RISC processor can implement various self-organizing algorithms to support no-touch, plug-and-play operation under any network deployment conditions. Additionally, the SON capability allows for Nextivity’s booster range to be seamlessly deployed as part of larger deployments of small cell networks.
  • 6 RISC cores; double the transistors – ARES's Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) deliver the equivalent performance of 250 Giga multiply–accumulate (MAC) operations per second, 4 times more than its previous generation.
  • Relays up to four 20MHz Cellular RF bands – ARES now supports and automatically configures for any combination of WCDMA, HSPA+ and LTE carriers to deliver optimal indoor signal quality.

“The continuing shift away from landlines to mobile-only homes and offices, coupled with the rise in bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies among businesses, and the burgeoning Internet of Things (IoT) market, makes it even more imperative to have strong and reliable indoor cellular coverage”, says Werner Sievers, President and CEO of Nextivity Inc. “With double the transistors of its predecessor, our third generation processor provides the intelligence, flexibility, and power to handle this growing demand from enterprises and consumers while being fully transparent to, and integrated with, mobile operators’ networks.”

http://nextivityinc.com/

Monday, October 28, 2013

FCC Supports Lower 700 MHz Band Agreement

The FCC endorsed a voluntary industry agreement that will establish interoperable LTE service in the Lower 700 MHz band and adopted and an Order that modifies the technical rules of the D and E blocks.

The FCC said its new rules remove the likelihood of harm caused by attendant power levels while continuing to allow high-value uses of the D and E blocks.

The order also proposes to modify AT&T's B and C block licenses to incorporate the commitments of AT&T and makes changes in construction requirements and deadlines for various E Block licensees in the Lower 700 MHz band.

The Lower 700 MHz interoperability agreement was brokered by several wireless providers, along with the Competitive Carriers Association.  The FCC expects it will give consumers more choice in using their devices with large and small carriers alike and will promote widespread deployment of mobile broadband services, especially in rural areas.

http://www.fcc.gov

In September 2013, the FCC and mobile operators announced an agreement that resolves handset interoperability issues in the lower 700 MHz bands.  At the time, the FCC's Acting Chairwoman, Mignon Clyburn issued the following statement:

"After many frustrating years, wireless carriers have finally reached a voluntary industry solution that will resolve the lack of interoperability in the lower 700 MHz band in the most efficient manner. This is a big win for consumers, especially in rural areas, who will see more competition and more choices. Also, by making it easier for small wireless carriers to compete, today's interoperability solution will spur private investment, job creation, and the development of innovative new services and devices.  "That's why for the past few years, I have been consistent in pushing for a final resolution to this issue. Thank you to all the parties - AT&T, The Interoperability Alliance, The Competitive Carriers Association, DISH, and the consumer advocacy groups - who came to the table and worked collaboratively with FCC staff to hammer out a solution that benefits all consumers."

Monday, March 11, 2013

Dell'Oro: Microwave Transmission Market Declined 12% in 2012


The point-to-point Microwave Transmission equipment market declined 12 percent worldwide in 2012 to $4.2 billion as radio transceiver shipments declined 6 percent to 1.5 million, according to a new report from Dell'Oro Group.

"The market for microwave backhaul was truly impacted by surprisingly low demand in the European region," said Jimmy Yu, Vice President of Microwave Transmission research at Dell'Oro Group.  "Although the market really took a step back this year, there were a couple of bright spots.  The first was the growth in sales in the North American region as operators expanded their Long Term Evolution (LTE) networks.  The second was the greater usage of ultra-high-capacity links using E-band frequencies to deliver a full gigabit of backhaul capacity to cell towers," Yu added.

Some highlights:

  • The North American region was the only region to achieve significant positive growth in 2012, growing 13 percent.  Alcatel-Lucent captured the majority of the North American market, garnering 44 percent market share.
  • Microwave sales in the European region pulled back sharply in 2012, declining 28 percent.  Ericsson held the highest share of the European market at 32 percent.
  • Ultra-high-capacity radio transceiver shipments grew nearly 60 percent in 2012.

Friday, March 8, 2013

Infonetics: Microwave Radio Market Declines


The global microwave equipment market totaled $1.2 billion in 4Q12, down 3% from 3Q12, and down 12% from the year-ago 4th quarter (4Q11), according to a new report from Infonetics Research.  Microwave equipment spending declined 10% worldwide for the full year 2012.

"The microwave equipment market ended 2012 tamely,” reports Richard Webb, directing analyst for microwave and carrier WiFi at Infonetics Research. “The expected year-end boost to quarterly revenues did not materialize, as price erosion and capex conservation combined to deliver a seasonally countertrend 4th quarter dip. We expect the market trough to hang around a little while longer before renewed growth begins in late 2013,” Webb continues. “And by 2017, Infonetics forecasts the microwave equipment market to reach $5.2 billion, powered by the continuing demand for backhaul capacity at macrocell sites."

Some other notes:

  • Ericsson, Huawei, and NEC held steady at the top of the microwave equipment revenue leaderboard in 4Q12, though #4 Alcatel-Lucent closed the gap on NEC significantly, pulling to within a hair’s breadth
  • Aviat Networks leapfrogged Ceragon to move into the #5 spot in 4Q12, cracking the top 5 for the 1st time
  • Alcatel-Lucent continues to lead the all-packet segment, accounting for half of all revenue.

http://www.infonetics.com

See also