Showing posts with label OpenFlow. Show all posts
Showing posts with label OpenFlow. Show all posts

Monday, November 7, 2016

Noviflow Scales Up its OpenFlow Switching

NoviFlow, a start-up based in Montreal, released a new version of OpenFlow 1.3/1.4/1.5 switching software aimed at large-scale networks.
Key new features of NoviWare supporting large-scale deployment introduced in release 400.1 include:

  • OpenFlow queues and up to one million meters for use with QoS mechanisms
  • Dynamic provisioning of ports in LAG
  • Plug-and-Play deployment support for large installations:
    - Switch IP address default set via DHCP
  • - gRPC for remote automated provisioning
  • OpenFlow Experimenter-based extensions:
    - VLAN payload matching
    - Symmetric Hash of Fields

400.1 NoviWare fully supports the OpenFlow 1.3 standard and 1.4, including all actions, instructions and match fields, as well as key features of OpenFlow 1.5, such as Copy-Fields action.

"Since the founding of NoviFlow in 2012 as a spin-out from UQAM, our goal has always been to design and deliver SDN solutions that leverage Network Processors to offer both unsurpassed programmability and wire-speed performance, a major innovation in networking equipment. Today, the inherent advantage of this approach has been proven in the field via deployments of our products at a host of major network operators and cloud operators, resulting in ever-increasing demand for our solutions.”

NoviFlow’s products are being used as switches, WAN IP/MPLS routers, network appliances and other high-performance forwarding planes.

http://noviflow.com/products/noviware/


Monday, February 29, 2016

Pica8 Cranks Up OpenFlow Switching by 1000x

Pica8 is introducing a Table Type Patterns (TTP) functionality in its PicOS network operating system that overcomes limitations in OpenFlow scaling for very large data centers.

The company said TTP enables its PicOS to scale to 2 million flows with Cavium’s XPliant switch ASIC, and to 256,000 flows with Broadcom’s StrataXGS Tomahawk switch ASIC. Typical TCAM flow capacity in the top-of-rack installed base today is between 1,000 and 2,000 flows, and with Pica8’s TTP implementation, production networks can scale 1,000 times more.

TTP defines how tables are set up in a switch, which an SDN controller can program via the OpenFlow switch protocol. The development of a TTP-based approach has been motivated by several factors, including: to maximize the available capacity, to better accommodate heterogeneity of existing hardware switches, to enable future innovation in hardware switches through more seamless SDN application development, and to enable granular and automated communication between application / controller developers and switch vendors.

“TTP and our own abstraction technology – vASIC -- unlock custom ASICs to bring choice, programmability and scale to application developers,” said Dan Tuchler, vice president of product management at Pica8. “Application developers no longer have to worry about the limitations or differences between ASICs when delivering their solutions to the market.”

TTP is in early release and will be generally available with PicOS in March.

http://www.pica8.com/news/pica8s-ttp-increases-sdn-scaling-on-data-center-switches-by-1000x

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Blueprint: Can OpenFlow 1.3.1 and TTP Enable SDN for Carrier Networks?

by Nicholas Ilyadis
Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Infrastructure & Networking Group (ING), Broadcom


Software Defined Networking (SDN) is a trend that continues to garner widespread industry attention these days due to its ability to manage network complexity via a network-wide software platform. Perhaps the most well-known of all SDN instantiations is OpenFlow; the industry’s first standard communications interface between the control and forwarding layers of an SDN architecture. Originally introduced by Stanford and later taken over by the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) consortium, the technology has steadily amassed a growing community of users. And it’s those users who have helped guide the technology’s evolution through the years.
A perfect case in point is the introduction of the OpenFlow 1.3.1 switch specification. It was developed in direct response to the community’s need for a switch that mapped to OpenFlow; a capability that would help enable SDN for carrier networks. The problem was figuring out just how to make it happen. That task fell to the ONF’s Forwarding Abstractions Working Group (FAWG).
At the outset FAWG faced a key challenge: OpenFlow 1.0 was not designed on switches. It was developed on servers and that meant that all of the data structures for forwarding data flows through a network, and being able to do look-ups and make decisions on packet flows and forwarding were basically mapped into the server memory. Servers have a significant amount of memory so it was fairly easy to create a unified table that could be used to reference the packet heade
rs coming in and make forwarding decisions.

This approach; however, was at odds with what the OpenFlow community wanted. It wanted a uniform model that could be used to describe an OpenFlow switch; a single table with entries in it that could be used to design a switch with that construct. But switches don’t have that construct; they have several different constructs. And they are typically made out of several smaller tables that are used to look up different parts of a packet header, rather than just one massive table. Switches just don’t have the same resources as servers. Porting OpenFlow 1.0 to switches became a challenge and limited its capabilities on real-world switch hardware.

Faced with this reality, FAWG began to consider another possibility. Rather than redesigning all switches to fit the OpenFlow model, perhaps it could just modify OpenFlow to be more applicable to real-world switches.

As an example, consider that when we say the word “car” today, it quickly conjures up an image of a vehicle with four wheels, a steering wheel, gear shifter, and brake and gas pedals. This uniform description ensures that you have the ability to drive a car, regardless of its types (e.g., SUV or sedan), as long as it meets the key elements specified in that description. This same type of uniform description is exactly what FAWG set out to create, only for the switch.

What it came up with is a way to describe a switch in a uniform manner using Table Type Partitioning (TTP) that OpenFlow understands and that is inclusive enough to allow many different real-world switches to fit that description. TTP is leveraged in OpenFlow 1.3.1.

A TTP is an abstract switch model that describes specific switch forwarding behaviors that an OpenFlow controller can program via the OpenFlow-Switch protocol. The switch forwarding behaviors are described via a sequence of tables that have ingress port information coming in and match fields going out. OpenFlow 1.3.1 specifies an OpenFlow switch that defines a pipeline containing multiple tables with each table containing multiple flow entries. Any variability in the switch that is outside of the TTP is covered as an extension, in much the same way that you could add features to the uniform car description, such as special lights or two versus four seats.

Because real-world switches from different vendors can now be described as a set of TTPs, they can be easily programmed to do their jobs, without users having to worry about any underlying details, such as how they were built or with what components. It’s really no different than being able to drive say, a sports car, without having to be concerned with what type of engine it has. At the end of the day, that means greater adoption of the OpenFlow standard on hardware forwarding targets and, with broad adoption of common TTPs, easier controller implementation will surely follow.

While the OFN’s FAWG was able to come up with a way for OpenFlow to understand real-world switches in a uniform manner, its efforts do nothing to address how to map the real-world switch to the TTP model in OpenFlow 1.3.1. And, that means deploying OpenFlow 1.3.1 in real-world deployments is neither quick nor easy.

One resolution to this dilemma comes from an industry source and it takes the form of an open source abstraction layer known as OpenFlow-Data Plan Abstract (OF-DPA) 1.0. OF-DPA essentially homogenizes the underlying switch so that it meets the OpenFlow 1.3.1 model. Or more simply put, it takes an SUV or sedan and makes it look like a generic car model.

With little doubt, OpenFlow is hoping to play a critical role in transforming the future of networking. OpenFlow 1.3.1 and TTPs, by enabling OpenFlow on industry standard switches, also aims to contribute to that transformation. Now, developments like OF-DPA are taking things one step further by making deployment of SDN in existing switch networks quick and easy. These advances bode well for enabling SDN on carrier networks, and that means network administrators will be able to roll out new services and functionality faster and with fewer errors, and more easily balance network loads. It’s capabilities like this that make SDN such a compelling answer to the complex challenges facing today’s networks and data centers.

About the Author

Nicholas (Nick) Ilyadis serves as Vice President and Chief Technical Officer of Broadcom’s Infrastructure and Networking Group (ING), where he is responsible for product strategy and cross portfolio initiatives for a broad portfolio of Ethernet chip products including network switches, high speed controllers, PHYs, enterprise WLAN, SerDes, silicon photonics, processors and security. Prior to Broadcom, Ilyadis served as Vice President of Engineering for Enterprise Data Products at Nortel Networks and held various engineering positions at Digital Equipment Corporation and Itek Optical Systems. Ilyadis holds an MSEE from the University of New Hampshire and a BTEE from the Rochester Institute of Technology. Ilyadis is a senior member of the IEEE and contributes to both the IEEE Computer and Communications Societies.


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Sunday, July 5, 2015

Video: Corsa Demos SDN Metering and QoS




Corsa Technology is a networking company that offers a full, OpenFlow programmable data plane that delivers performance, flexibility, and scale. Its DP6400 series switch offers full support for OpenFlow 1.3, with multiple match/action tables, deep packet buffers and fast flow-mod update capability in a fully programmable platform.

At the recent Open Networking Summit 2015 in Santa Clara, California, Corsa demonstrated its new bandwidth metering and QoS capabilities.   Corsa also conducted a multi-vendor packet/optical optimization demonstration,  along with a demonstration of the new "Atrium" software release from the ONF.

The first use case for SDN-based metering and QoS involves large data set transfers, such as between major research facilities and super computer labs. Corsa's demo uses OpenFlow 1.3.

Presented by Bruce Gregory, David Whittaker, and Carolyn Raab.

https://youtu.be/obUZTBB76xM

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Cavium Shows New Xpliant Silicon Driving SDN-enable Ethernet Switches

Cavium is demonstrating OpenFlow and OpenFlow-Hybrid Ethernet switches based on its new XPliant silicon.

Cavium's XPliant Ethernet switches deliver full line rate support in OpenFlow through XPliant's SDK APIs and integration of Open vSwitch (OVS) at an aggregate switching capacity of 3.2 terabits per second.

"Historically, large scale data center customers were only interested in the speeds and feeds of networking silicon. Now customers are looking for standards based vendor interoperable features that enable them to effectively control their networks, scale and grow over time," said Eric Hayes, VP/GM, Switch Platform Group at Cavium. "The XPA architecture is the ideal solution available today with all of these capabilities simultaneously in a cost effective manner."

Cavium noted its XPliant packet architecture XPA Software APIs expose the OVS control abstractions, enabling users to benefit from OVS rich management and networking features, such as L2 pipeline (VLANs, LAGs, FDB, STP etc.), bonding modes (LACP), and advanced tunneling protocols (Geneve, VxLAN, NVGRE) as well as future yet-to-be-defined standards. Now, through XPA Software and APIs, these open and industry proven features can be seamlessly invoked representing a truly hybrid switch optimized for virtualized environments, in a single hardware.

http://www.cavium.com



  • In September 2014, Cavium made its entrance into the merchant Ethernet switching silicon market with the launch of its programmable XPliant Packet Architecture and chips. The technology for this new product line originates with XPliant, a Silicon Valley start-up that Cavium agreed to acquire in July.  The new products target switches for cloud / enterprise data centers and service provider infrastructure, for both top-of-rack and backbone applications.
    The company said its design approach with its XPliant Packet Architecture was to take the dedicated function blocks present in conventional Layer 2 switching silicon and replace then will a flexible Table Type structure that enables software personalities to dictate the exact operation to be performed – for packet parsing, table look-ups, packet re-writes, fabric scheduling, and statistics and counters – without impacting performance. The company said its design fits well with the spine/leaf architecture of scale-out data centers.

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Ixia Announces Native OpenFlow Integration

Ixia announced support for OpenFlow enabled switches from industry leading manufacturers for its ControlTower distributed network visibility platform.  Supported products include Arista, Dell and HP OpenFlow enabled switches.

Ixia said its ControlTower visibility solution allows customers to leverage SDN and seamlessly layer the sophisticated management and advanced processing features of Ixia’s Net Tool Optimizer (NTO) family of solutions on top of the flexibility and baseline feature set provided by OpenFlow switches.

Key highlights of the expanded visibility architecture include:


  • Ease of use, advanced processing functions and single pane of glass configuration through Ixia’s NTO user interface and purpose-built hardware
  • Full programmability and automation control using RESTful APIs
  • Patented automatic filter compiler engine for hassle-free visibility
  • Architectural support for line speeds from 1Gbps to 100Gbps in a highly scalable design
  • Open, standards-based integration with the flexibility to use a variety of OpenFlow enabled hardware and virtual switch platforms
  • Dynamic repartitioning of switch ports between production switching and visibility enablement to optimize infrastructure utilization


http://www.ixiacom.com/

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

ONF to Support Open vSwitch, Appoints Principal System Architect

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) announced the appointment of Saurav Das as principal system architect, and the establishment of a new project to build upon the OpenFlow Configuration and Management Protocol (OF-CONFIG) to support Open vSwitch (OVS).

As Principal System Architect, Dr. Saurav brings deep SDN and networking software expertise to support new ONF development projects, working with ONF’s CTO and Software Leadership Councils. Saurav’s background in SDN can be traced back to his doctoral research at Stanford University. Under the direction of Professor Nick McKeown (a member of the ONF Board of Directors), he was part of the research group at Stanford that gave birth to SDN as we know it. His work developed a converged IP/MPLS/Optical WAN architecturally founded on SDN and OpenFlow. Post-graduation, he worked as part of the engineering team at Big Switch Networks, investigating SDN platform scalability in large data center networks.

“Open-source resources provide a tangible foundation from which the industry can quickly implement SDN, rapidly increasing the speed at which open SDN can be leveraged by end users,” said Das. “With this understanding, ONF is placing increased emphasis on open source. Stay tuned – much more is coming from the organization in 2015.”

https://www.opennetworking.org/

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Sckipio Demos OpenFlow over G.fast Distribution Point Unit

Sckipio Technologies, a start-up based in Israel, demonstrated OpenFlow control over a commercial G.fast DPU hardware.

The demonstration includes a 16-port fully vectored Sckipio DP3000-EVM G.fast Distribution Point Unit device transmitting over a 50 meter twisted pair binder to 16 separate Sckipio CP1000-EVM units.

Sckipio said its demonstration shows ultra high-speed broadband access over telephone wires being controlled using an open framework instead of utilizing proprietary approaches.

“Telcos expect G.fast to run as open, Software Defined Networks,” said David Baum, CEO of Sckipio. “OpenFlow is the critical technology to make their vision possible and Sckipio is the first company to show it working on a G.fast networking node.”

http://www.sckipio.com

Thursday, December 4, 2014

ON.Lab Releases its Open Source SDN Network Operating System

The Open Networking Lab, ON.Lab, and leading service providers, including AT&T, NTT Communications and key vendors, are releasing an open source SDN Open Network Operating System (ONOS) for Service Providers that enables agile service creation and deployment at scale on any hardware, including white boxes.

ONOS will be available for download starting later today, Friday, Dec. 5.

ONOS features a highly available, scalable SDN control plane featuring northbound and southbound open APIs and paradigms for a diversity of management, control, and service applications across mission critical networks. ON.Lab said it was architected to provide high availability, scalability, performance and rich northbound and southbound abstractions.

Key features of the first ONOS release include:

  • A clean-slate, clustered, modular architecture with distributed core for high availability, performance and scale-out
  • Application Intent Framework providing a high-level policy driven, network-agnostic programmatic abstraction and interface
  • Pluggable southbound for supporting a diversity of devices and protocols.
  • OpenFlow 1.3 and 1.0 support
  • GUI for visualization, visibility and configuration
  • Apache Karaf for modularity, customization and extensibility
  • Service provider use cases to demonstrate capabilities such as—
  • Multilayer SDN control for packet-optical networks
  • SDN-IP for seamless peering of SDN islands within legacy networks
  • Proof of concept Network Functions as a Service (NFaaS)
  • SDN-based WAN control with segment routing (developed with ONF) 
  • Developer and end-user on-boarding resources
  • QA infrastructure and processes
  • Black Duck audit certifying usability and cleanliness of open source ONOS codebase

"The ONOS project partnership was formed with a unique blend of service providers, vendors and ON.Lab to accelerate the adoption of SDN by providers," said Bill Snow, vice president of Engineering at ON.Lab. "A highly available and scalable open source SDN OS platform will help transform service provider networks by delivering significant CapEx and OpEx savings and enabling new revenue-generating services. The first release of ONOS is the start of the journey towards service provider network transformation."

"2015 will be a pivotal year for the open source ONOS project," said Guru Parulkar, executive director of ON.Lab. "We will grow the ONOS community, harden and enhance the current architecture and code, and focus all of our efforts on accelerating SDN adoption in service provider and mission critical networks."

Founding members who are funding and contributing to the ONOS initiative include AT&T, NTT Communications, Ciena, Fujitsu, Huawei, Intel, NEC; and members who are collaborating and contributing to ONOS include Infoblox, SRI, Internet2, CNIT and Create-Net.

http://onosproject.org

Monday, November 10, 2014

Pica8's CrossFlow Combines OpenFlow-based Policy with L2/L3

Pica8 introduced a new capability that lets its PicOS bare metal switch operating system integrate OpenFlow-based applications and business-logic policies into existing Layer-2 / Layer-3 networks.



The new CrossFlow Networking lets administrators run L2/L3 protocols and OpenFlow on the same switch at the same time. This lets users leverage OpenFlow for policy-driven applications to drive business logic into the network, while leveraging their network topology and protocols like OSPF and BGP for the most efficient packet transport and performance.

Pica8 said its CrossFlow Networking brings the potential to significantly accelerate SDN adoption because customers are able to run OpenFlow on the existing L2/L3 network.

“Some customers have made commitment to OpenFlow in green field deployments, but networking shops with existing infrastructure want to be able to use OpenFlow in use cases where it makes sense,” said Steve Garrison, vice president of marketing and Pica8. “For the first time, CrossFlow mode allows users to leverage both ways of thinking – Layer-2 / Layer-3 and OpenFlow – to deal with networking challenges appropriately on the same switch.”

Some sample use cases include:
  • In a traditional data center that uses Layer-2 / Layer-3 switching and routing, monitoring and tapping can be done on the switches with rules triggered by the OpenFlow protocol.
  • In an OpenFlow data center, the edge devices need to interact with traditional switching/routing devices (using spanning tree, OSPF, BGP, and other Layer-2 / Layer-3 
Available in PicOS 2.4, CrossFlow allows every port in the bare metal switch the ability to act as either a legacy or a CrossFlow port. A legacy port uses traditional Layer-2 / Layer- 3 switch (OVS) commands can be used, either locally via OVS commands or via an SDN controller using OpenFlow and OVSDB.

http://www.pica8.com/


  • Pica8 currently claims over 320 customers.
  • Pica8 is based in Palo Alto, California with development offices in Beijing.
  • In October, Pica8 announced $12.5 million in Series B funding from a group of investors led by VantagePoint Capital Partners, Cross Head and Pacific Venture Partners (PVP), bringing its total funding to date to over $20 million.

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Brocade Expands its Campus Switching Line-up, Adds OpenFlow 1.3

Brocade unveiled a number of new campus network products, including the Brocade ICX 7750-based distributed chassis, the new Brocade ICX 7450 enterprise campus stackable switch, and the availability of OpenFlow 1.3 support for emerging campus SDN applications.

Highlights of the Expanded Brocade Campus Strategy:

Brocade ICX 7750

  • a 1U fixed form factor 10/40 GbE switch with up to 32 40 GbE or 96 10 GbE ports per unit, 
  • Delivers a scale-out architecture enabling up to 12 Brocade ICX 7750 switches to be stacked across the campus in a more flexible topology for network aggregation and core layers
  • Provides consolidated management touch points and support for SDN to automate network configuration tasks


Brocade ICX 7450 Switch

  • Up to 12 switches can be stacked for 160 Gbps of stacking bandwidth, and long-distance stacking using open-standards QSFP+ ports to enable single-point management across the campus
  • Modular design with three expansion slots for a choice of 1, 10, or 40 GbE uplinks
  • Power over HDBaseT (PoH), to power video surveillance and video conferencing equipment, VDI terminals, and HD displays directly from the switch


OpenFlow 1.3 Support for the Brocade ICX Product Family

  • Brocade OpenFlow Hybrid Port Mode supports both OpenFlow forwarding and normal routing traffic forwarding, enabling a seamless transition to real-world SDN deployment
  • OpenFlow is universally supported in Brocade ICX switches whether deployed individually, in mixed stacks, or in distributed stacks for SDN implementation flexibility across wiring closets
  • Campus customers can build a reliable SDN network that has been certified with the OpenDaylight-based Brocade Vyatta Controller and emerging SDN applications

In addition, Brocade and Aruba are working together on open standards-based unified wired and wireless network access. The collaboration is expected to yield new product releases of Brocade Network Advisor 12.3, Aruba Airwave 8.0, and Brocade FastIron 8.0.20 with Aruba ClearPass CoA support.


http://newsroom.brocade.com/press-releases/brocade-expands-the-effortless-network-strategy-wi-nasdaq-brcd-1156057#.VFlgCPmjOM7

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Internet2 Launches Full-Production OpenFlow Capability

The Internet2 last week marked a major milestone in its network architecture by demonstrating the first nationwide, multi-tenant SDN-powered virtualized network capability.

The announcement was made at the 2014 Technology Exchange held last week in Indianapolis.

Conceptually, the virtualization enables the physical Internet2 Network to operate in isolated “slices” by leveraging innovations native to the Internet2 Network, including its 100G interfaces. The new SDN capability is driven by “FlowSpace Firewall” software installed in the Internet2 production network.  This allows slices of OpenFlow capabilities to be partitioned across nearly forty 100G-attached access nodes throughout the country. The software protects each network slice from overconsumption of resources by other slices.

The Internet2 says this first-in-class capability is now available to support the important work of the research and education (R&E) community’s data-intensive science and academic operations.

During the 2014 Technology Exchange conference, several initiatives were announced to build large-scale production cloud computing, next-generation IP and peering fabrics in virtual slices of the Internet2 Network.

These include two $10 million projects, called Chameleon and CloudLab, underwritten by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

“By connecting CloudLab to Internet2's nationwide SDN network, we can give researchers a level of end-to-end network programmability that is unprecedented in a cloud platform, said Robert Ricci, a research assistant professor of computer science at the University of Utah and principal investigator of CloudLab. Having this level of control, programmability, and visibility into the network will enable the research community to push the boundaries of cloud networking and explore the future of network architectures for the cloud.

http://www.internet2.edu/news/detail/7257/

More on FlowSpace Firewall:
http://globalnoc.iu.edu/software/sdn.html

Monday, June 2, 2014

ONF's Fifth PlugFest Tests OpenFlow v1.3

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) completed its fifth semi-annual PlugFest last month at two of ONF’s global testing facilities: the Beijing Internet Institute (BII) in Beijing, China and the Indiana Center for Network Translational Research and Education (InCNTRE) at Indiana University.  This was the first time on ONF PlugFest occurred outside the U.S. and the first time it was staged simultaneously in multiple locations.

The event provided participating companies the opportunity to test for interoperability and enhance implementations of OpenFlow v1.3 in commercial and test controllers and switches. OpenFlow v1.3 includes capabilities that are finely tuned for commercial and enterprise networks, such as quality-of-service, Q-in-Q VLAN tunneling, group tables, active-standby controller, and IPv6.

“This PlugFest marked an important milestone for OpenFlow v1.3, as it was the third time this version had been tested which featured more maturity and advanced features  on products from multiple vendors,” said Michael Haugh, product marketing director at Ixia and chair of the Open Networking Foundation Testing and Interoperability Working Group. “The ability to test products on OpenFlow v1.3 provides the framework for carrier-grade SDN and promotes the growth and adoption we continue to see in the OpenFlow protocol.”  

“PlugFests provide a great opportunity for ONF to drive interoperability, deployment, and commercialization of OpenFlow-based SDN,” said Rick Bauer, technical program manager of the Open Networking Foundation. “With this being our first global PlugFest, the wide spectrum of participating member companies was a testament to SDN’s growing international footprint.”

Attendees of the PlugFest included approximately 50 representatives from 18 participating ONF member companies, including Brocade, Centec Networks, Digital China Networks, Ltd., Freescale, GreeNet, H3C, HP, IBM, Infoblox, Ixia (Net Optics), Luxoft, NEC, Netronome, NoviFlow, Pica8, Spirent, xNet, and ZTE.

http://www.opennetworking.org

Monday, March 10, 2014

Open Source Optical (OSO) Forum Sets Course

A new Open Source Optical (OSO) Forum has been established to promote the adoption of standards-based, interchangeable, easy-to-use, and power-efficient optical networking technologies into next-generation data centers and cloud environments.

The new forum, which was initiated by Vello Systems and includes the initial participation of Accelink, CoAdna, CrossFiber, O-Net, PacketLight and Pacnet, aims to bring together optical component and system vendors, software companies, channel partners and end-users in order to define and promote OpenFlow-based, merchant-optical networking solutions.

Vello's mission is to provide the software that fundamentally changes IT consumption models, making them better tailored to the demands of enterprise and individual end users. Customers are calling for more flexibility and new tools to realize their IT delivery solutions. Vello's goal has been to unify standard software with vendor-agnostic merchant hardware to ease adoption by users," said Karl May, CEO, Vello Systems. "One major goal with OSO is to decouple the hardware and software innovation cycles and give vendors in both categories greater freedom to innovate. We want to extend the open networking revolution to optical systems."

The OSO Forum organizers expect that some members will simply port OSO software onto their existing optical systems, making them instantly compatible with OpenFlow controller and application frameworks. Other members may choose to build next-generation Native OpenFlow, enterprise-friendly 10G/40G/100G 1RU "pizza box" optical systems, or other appliances, as their go-to-market solutions. Moving forward, any software solution that supports OpenFlow 1.4 can also be used to run OSO-based optical solutions. Vello will also be making the optical extensions generally available to be incorporated into other OpenFlow network controller frameworks. Importantly, OSO software will include the optical extensions that are part of OpenFlow Version 1.4, which were authored and contributed by Vello in the Open Networking Foundation.

"Specific application of OpenFlow-based SDN to optical components and networks opens up novel opportunities to add connectivity options within and between data centers, improve price-performance, and apply dynamic software control to flexible, application-independent infrastructure," said Dan Pitt, executive director of the Open Networking Foundation. "We look forward to collaborating with the OSO community to understand their requirements and contribute solutions."

http://www.vellosystems.com/osocomingsoon/
http://www.opensourceoptical.org

Monday, March 3, 2014

ONF Releases Educational Network Tapping Application

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) released an open-source network tapping application built on OpenFlow and designed to serve as an educational resource for programmers.

The application was developed with Wiretap Labs, a Silicon Valley-based consultancy specializing in custom development for cloud, security and SDN solutions. of March 2014. It is based on OpenFlow 1.0 and was written to run on an OpenDaylight controller. SampleTap has been tested and will be demonstrated with OpenFlow Conformance-Certified NEC switches. It was based on OpenFlow 1.0 because the recently announced OpenDaylight Hydrogen release, which supports OpenFlow 1.3, was not available at the time of the app’s writing. It was also designed for easy portability to other network operating systems and support later versions of OpenFlow. The ONF noted that a number of its member companies, including Big Switch Networks, Cisco, Gigamon, HP, IBM, Ixia (Net Optics), NEC, and NetScout, offer or plan to offer commercial-grade network tapping products.

“In evaluating potential educational applications, we selected network tapping as it is broadly understood and easily deployable by network operators,” said Dan Pitt, executive director of the Open Networking Foundation. “We see our app as an OpenFlow teaching tool that allows network operators to get experience with OpenFlow without changing how they actually do the switching and routing, since tapping doesn’t use OpenFlow for forwarding.”

"We hear tremendous interest from users who want to test OpenFlow in their networks and this app is the perfect way for them to get started," said Neela Jacques, executive director, OpenDaylight. "We are excited that ONF used OpenDaylight's controller for this and look forward to hearing how these open source technologies are being implemented in software-defined networks."

ONF will be demonstrating the SampleTap application at this week's Open Networking Summit in Santa Clara.

http://www.opennetworking.org

Thursday, February 6, 2014

What's new on the agenda for this year's Open Networking Summit?




Guru Parulkar, Chair of the Open Networking Summit, previews some of the highlights of this year's ONS agenda.

Date: March 3-5, 2014
Venue: Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, California

Keynotes include: Vinod Khosla (Khosla Ventures, John Donovan (AT&T), Albert Greenberg (Microsoft), Amin Vahdat (Google) and others.


Got a story to tell at ONS 2014?  Let me know... jc@convergedigest.com

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

ONF Appoints Huawei’s Serge Manning to Head Wireless and Mobile WG

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) has appointed Dr. Serge Manning, senior manager for corporate standards at Huawei, as the chairperson of the ONF Wireless and Mobile Working Group.

The recently formed Working Group was created to collect use cases and determine architectural and protocol requirements for extending OpenFlow-based technologies to wireless and mobile domains. The goal is to propose common ground architectural frameworks that will encompass different elements of OpenFlow-based or OpenFlow-oriented wireless and mobile network domains. Already the group has created three projects, related to the mobile packet core, wireless backhaul, and integrated fixed/wireless operation in the enterprise.

“Serge brings decades of telecommunications experience to his position as chair of our Wireless and Mobile Working Group,” said Dan Pitt, executive director of the Open Networking Foundation. “His expertise and the work of this new Group will be important as we more deeply engage with wireless and mobile operators around the globe. With the exponential growth of mobile data, there is an inherent need to simultaneously operate over multiple wireless technologies. By studying the open SDN requirements of wireless and mobile networks, OpenFlow and related ONF endeavors can be enhanced to bring even greater benefit to this space.”

“I look forward to working closely with other technical Working Groups within ONF to expand carrier and operator knowledge of the benefits of SDN for their networks,” said Dr. Manning. “Standards such as OpenFlow are highly applicable to wireless and mobile networks, even though there has not been a wide exploration of the specific needs and requirements of these networks to date. That is why we were created.”

http://www.opennetworking.org


Video: ONF's Dan Pitt Discusses SDN for Wireless & Mobile

http://youtu.be/R0rXfAtPvPQ

Work gets underway at The Open Networking Foundation's (ONF's) new Wireless and Mobile Working Group.  Dan Pitt, Executive Director of the ONF, comments on the appointment of Dr. Serge Manning, senior manager for corporate standards at Huawei, as chairperson of the working group.

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

ONF's Plugfest Tests OpenFlow v1.3 and OF-Config v1.1.1

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) conducted its fourth, semi-annual PlugFest earlier this month at the Spirent Proof of Concept (SPOC) Lab in Sunnyvale, California. The event focused on the testing of OpenFlow v1.3 and the OpenFlow Management and Configuration Protocol (OF-Config) v1.1.1 through a “speed dating” format.

Participating companies’ switches, controllers, and applications were paired together through one-on-one testing and small topologies, generating hundreds of testing permutations and completing several months worth of work during one week-long event.

This PlugFest event was the first time OF-Config v1.1.1 – an open standard developed by the ONF Configuration and Management Working Group – was tested. OF-Config allows the ecosystem to recognize the capabilities and preferences of controllers and switches within an OpenFlow-based SDN network.

“We are always impressed by the innovations of our member companies, and ONF PlugFests are the perfect opportunities to experience those efforts first-hand,” said Dan Pitt, executive director of the Open Networking Foundation. “The atmosphere of this event was very collegial, attendees were passionate about the work taking place, and the event was ultimately very well-received. We’re so thankful to Spirent for their hard work and diligence in planning this ONF PlugFest – they were an exceptional host.”

https://www.opennetworking.org

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Spirent and Luxoft Show OpenFlow Compliance Test Solution

Spirent Communications and Luxoft announced an OpenFlow Compliance Testing solution for automating QA and regression testing for OpenFlow products. The solution is being shown at the fourth semi-annual ONF Plugfest being hosted at the Spirent Proof of Concept (SPOC) lab in Sunnyvale, CA, November 4-8, 2013.

Solution highlights include:

  • OpenFlow 1.3 and 1.4 Compliance Testing – Spirent’s iTest OpenFlow Compliance Test Solution Pack, powered by Luxoft, includes more than 400 test cases that support the latest OpenFlow 1.3 and 1.4 specifications. The solution combines Spirent iTest’s easy-to-use GUI and test case development tools with Luxoft’s backend for distributed and parallel execution of comprehensive OpenFlow 1.3 and 1.4 conformance testing.
  • OpenFlow Conformance Certification Preparation – Spirent’s iTest-OFTest Solution Pack addresses the needs of users preparing for ONF Conformance Certification by automating installation, configuration and execution of OFTest, the open source test tool used by ONF for OpenFlow certification testing.
  • QA & Regression Testing Automation for OpenFlow – Spirent iTest enables experienced feature testers and engineers to easily build or extend fully-automated test cases to speed up replication, defect resolution and regression testing.
  • Professional Services & Continuous Integration Software Engineering Practices – Spirent partners with Luxoft to provide on-demand customization, quality assurance and conformance coaching services. 

http://www.spirent.com/
http://www.luxoft.com/

See also