Showing posts with label Intel. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Intel. Show all posts

Monday, February 19, 2018

Intelsat and SES agree on joint use of C-band by satellite and mobile operators

Intelsat and SES last week both agreed to back a proposal to the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) the seeks to protect satellite services in the 3700-4200 MHz C-band downlink spectrum while opening a specified portion of that spectrum for terrestrial mobile use.

The companies said their joint proposal sets a commercial and technical framework that would enable wireless operators to quickly access approximately 100 MHz of nationwide C-band downlink spectrum in the United States, speeding the deployment of next-generation 5G services. The idea builds on an innovative model first put forward to the FCC by Intelsat and Intel in October 2017 for spectrum sharing.

Under the proposal, a consortium of satellite operators would be created to oversee the governance of the initiative, define and implement the methodology for spectrum clearance, and serve as the sole interface for market-based transactions with parties interested in deploying terrestrial mobile services in specific portions of the C-band.

“The C-band is and remains a critical component of the U.S. network architecture. Space and ground segment operators have invested billions of dollars in U.S. C-band networks and connectivity and generate important value out of it. It is, therefore, our duty and mission to protect the C-band in the U.S. from any form of disruption and preserve its use,” stated Karim Michel Sabbagh, President and CEO of SES.

"Our proposed market-based solution provides a speedy resolution to the U.S. objective of accelerating deployment of 5G services. With Intelsat and SES now in agreement on major tenets of the framework and with the support of Intel, we are confident in our ability to implement this proposal quickly and efficiently, ultimately to the benefit of American consumers and the U.S. economy,” said Intelsat CEO Stephen Spengler.

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Intel intros 4 and 8 TB SSDs based on 64-layer 3D NAND

Intel introduced its first SSD designed for data center applications.

The Intel P4510 Series drives uses 64-layer TLC Intel 3D NAND. The density enables up to four times more terabytes per server and delivers up to 10 times better random read latency at 99.99 percent quality of service than previous generations. Intel says its drive can also deliver up to double the input-output operations per second (IOPS) per terabyte.

The 1 and 2TB capacities have been shipping to cloud service providers (CSPs) in high volume since August 2017, and the 4 and 8TB capacities are now available to CSPs and channel customers.

All capacities are in the 2.5-inch 15 mm U.2 form factor and utilize a PCIe* NVMe 3.0 x4 connection.


To help replace legacy storage hardware, Intel is also introducing two new technologies:


  • Intel Volume Management Device (VMD), which is included with Intel Xeon Scale processors, enable robust management such as surprise insertion/removal and LED management of PCIe SSDs directly connected to the CPU. 
  • Intel Virtual RAID on CPU (VROC) uses Intel VMD to provide RAID to PCIe SSDs. Replacing RAID cards with Intel VROC yields up to twice the IOPs performance and up to a 70 percent cost savings with PCIe SSDs directly attached to the CPU.


Intel also noted that the Enterprise and Datacenter SSD Form Factor specification was recently ratified by the EDSFF Working Group, which includes Intel, Samsung, Microsoft, Facebook and others.

Intel has been shipping a pre-spec version of the Intel SSD DC P4500.

  •  In August 2017, Intel introduced its  "ruler" form factor for SSD. Instead of the traditional, 2.5" or 3.5" rectangular box for disk drives, Intel's ruler is a long, thin box designed to slide in to a 1" server chassis, plugging in via a PCIe interface at the end of the ruler. It is a slick design. Apart from looking better, the long, thin shape dissipates heat easier. Intel showed a 1” RU server chassis accommodating 32 of these SSD rulers, creating up to 1 petabyte of storage. Intel could offer Optane SSDs and/or 3D NAND SSDs in this form factor.

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Intel flies Shooting Star drones at PyeongChang Opening Ceremony

The spectacular light show at the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 Opening Ceremony featured a new line of "Shooting Star" drones from Intel. The performance featured 1,200 drones flying in tandem, a new record for performance drones. The fleet of drones is controlled by one pilot.

Intel designed and developed custom animations for the opening ceremony and nightly victory ceremony performances, which include animations of different sports and various Olympic-related logos including the formation of the iconic Olympic rings.

“The Olympics are a time when the sports and entertainment industries are buzzing with record-setting performances, so it was the perfect stage for Intel Shooting Star drones and our team to set their own kind of record,” said Natalie Cheung, general manager of Intel’s drone light show team.

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Intel intros Xeon D-2100 for edge

Intel introduced a system-on-chip processor in its Xeon line that is architected to address the needs of edge applications and other data center or network applications.

The new Intel Xeon D-2100 processors include up to 18 “Skylake-server” generation Intel Xeon processor cores and integrated Intel QuickAssist Technology with up to 100 Gbps of built-in cryptography, decryption and encryption acceleration.

Intel said this processor will be supported by system software updates to protect against the Spectre and Meltdown security exploits.

In addition to edge deployments in communications service provider networks, other use cases for the Intel Xeon D-2100 processor include:
  • Storage: The Intel Xeon D-2100 processor is an option for density-optimized, lightweight hyperscale cloud workloads such as dynamic web serving, memory caching, dedicated hosting and warm storage.
  • Content Delivery Networks (CDNs): The processors can bring higher performance to content delivery at the network edge, which is critical to keep latency low for streaming media to viewers and those working in media fields with massive files.
  • Enterprise networks: The processor family also targets entry enterprise SAN and NAS storage, midrange routers, network appliances, security appliances, wireless base stations and embedded midrange IoT usages, among others.
“To seize 5G and new cloud and network opportunities, service providers need to optimize their data center and edge infrastructures to meet the growing demands of bandwidth-hungry end users and their smart and connected devices,” said Sandra Rivera, senior vice president and general manager of the Network Platforms Group at Intel. “The Intel Xeon D-2100 processor allows service providers and enterprises to deliver the maximum amount of compute intelligence at the edge or web tier while expending the least power.”

Sunday, February 4, 2018

Intel leads $100 million investment in Joby Aviation

Joby Aviation, a start-up developing an all-electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) passenger aircraft, raised $100 million in a Series B funding round led by Intel Capital.

Joby Aviation is working on a 5-seat aircraft capable of flying 150 miles (240km) on a charge.  The company is based in Santa Cruz, California.

Besides Intel Capital, additional investors in this funding round included Singapore-based EDBI, JetBlue Technology Ventures, Toyota AI Ventures, Allen & Company, AME Cloud Ventures, and Ron Conway, as well as existing investors Capricorn Investment Group, 8VC, Sky Dayton and Paul Sciarra. This brings the company’s total funding to over $130 million.

“People waste billions of hours sitting on roads worldwide each year. We envision a future where commuting by eVTOL is a safer, faster, and  cost-competitive alternative to ground transportation,” said Joby Aviation founder and CEO JoeBen Bevirt. “We have spent the last ten years developing
the technologies that have made our full-scale technical demonstrator possible and are now ready to build a commercial version of the aircraft. We’re excited to have attracted the backing of leaders in auto manufacturing, data intelligence, and transportation sectors.”

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Intel's data centric revenue grew 21% in Q4

Intel reported Q4 2017 revenue of $17.1 billion and record full-year revenue was $62.8 billion. Excluding McAfee, fourth-quarter revenue grew 8 percent year-over-year with data-centric revenue up 21 percent, and full-year revenue grew 9 percent year-over-year.


  • Data-centric businesses, which accounted for 47% of Intel's fourth-quarter revenue, an all-time high.
  • The Data Center Group (DCG), Internet of Things Group (IOTG) and Programmable Solutions Group (PSG) all achieved record quarterly revenue. 

"2017 was a record year for Intel with record fourth-quarter results driven by strong growth of our data-centric businesses," said Brian Krzanich, Intel CEO. “The strategic investments we've made in areas like memory, programmable solutions, communications and autonomous driving are starting to pay off and expand Intel's growth opportunity. In 2018, our highest priorities will be executing to our data-centric strategy and meeting the commitments we make to our shareholders and our customers."

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Swarm64 raises $12.5M for FPGA acceleration for databases

Swarm64, a Norwegian company with operations in Berlin, Germany secured a Series B funding round of US$12.5 million for its scalable data accelerator (SDA) for relational databases.

Swarm64 leverages an FPGA-based accelerator and real-time database software to perform analytics for high velocity and big data applications in PostgreSQL, MariaDB, and MySQL .


The funding round was led by Intel Capital and Investinor. Also participating in the round were Alliance Venture and Target Partners.

"We are very glad to welcome Intel Capital as a new investor. The cooperation with Intel will help us serve a global market with the most advanced technology.” says Karsten Rönner, CEO of Swarm64. “Many industries face an explosion in their data processing needs, be it from growing numbers of connected ‘things’, expanding business models that include data analytics or staying competitive in markets with ever higher data processing needs. The Swarm64SDA enables anyone with basic skills in relational databases to gain deep new business insights in less time.”

Monday, December 18, 2017

Intel ships Stratix 10 MX FPGA with High Bandwidth Memory DRAM

Intel has begun commercial shipments of the industry's first field programmable gate array (FPGA) with integrated High Bandwidth Memory DRAM (HBM2). Several variants are now available including the Intel Stratix 10 GX FPGAs (with 28G transceivers) and the Intel Stratix 10 SX FPGAs (with embedded quad-core ARM processor).

The Intel Stratix 10 MX FPGAs offer up to 10 times the memory bandwidth when compared with standalone DDR memory solutions, according to the company, making them suitable as multi-function accelerators for high-performance computing (HPC), data centers, network functions virtualization (NFV), and broadcast applications. The new devices provide a maximum memory bandwidth of 512 gigabytes per second with the integrated HBM2.

The Intel Stratix 10 MX FPGAs are manufactured using the company's 14 nm FinFET process and state-of-the-art packaging technology, including Embedded Multi-Die Interconnect Bridge (EMIB) technology to integrate HBM2 with the monolithic FPGA fabric.

"To efficiently accelerate these workloads, memory bandwidth needs to keep pace with the explosion in data" said Reynette Au, vice president of marketing, Intel Programmable Solutions Group. "We designed the Intel Stratix 10 MX family to provide a new class of FPGA-based multi-function data accelerators for HPC and HPDA markets."

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Intel outlines its 5G radio modem portfolio

Intel outlined its product roadmap for 5G silicon. First up is Intel XMM 8000 series, a family of 5G new radio (5G NR) multi-mode commercial modems, and the Intel XMM 7660 LTE modem.

Highlights of Intel’s wireless roadmap:

  • Intel XMM 8000 series: will operate in both sub-6 GHz and millimeter wave global spectrum bands. Intel is aiming to enable a range of devices to connect to 5G, including PC, phones, fixed wireless consumer premise equipment (CPE) and vehicles.
  • Intel XMM 8060: will offer multi-mode support for the full 5G non-standalone and standalone NR, as well as various 2G, 3G (including CDMA) and 4G legacy modes. It is expected to ship in commercial customer devices in mid-2019. Intel is targetting broad deployment of 5G networks in 2020.
  • Intel XMM 7660: Intel’s latest LTE modem delivers Cat-19 capabilities, supports speeds up to 1.6 Gbps, and features advanced multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO), carrier aggregation and a broad range of band support. It will ship in commercial devices in 2019.

Intel also announced it has successfully completed a full end-to-end 5G call based on its early 5G silicon over the 28GHz band. Intel says it is participating in dozens of 5G trials around the world.

“Intel is committed to delivering leading 5G multi-mode modem technology and making sure the transition to 5G is smooth,” said Dr. Cormac Conroy, Intel corporate vice president and general manager of the Communication and Devices Group. “Our investments in a full portfolio of modem technologies and products are critical to achieving the vision of seamless 5G connectivity.”

Monday, November 6, 2017

Intel partners with AMD on Embedded Multi-Die Interconnect Bridge for GPUs

Intel announced a partnership with AMD to tie together its high-performance processors with discrete graphics processors using the Intel Embedded Multi-Die Interconnect Bridge (EMIB) technology along with a new power-sharing framework.
The goal is to reduce the usual silicon footprint to less than half that of standard discrete components on a motherboard.

The first implementation matches the new 8th Gen Intel Core Core H-series processor, second generation High Bandwidth Memory (HBM2) and a custom-to-Intel third-party discrete graphics chip from AMD’s Radeon Technologies Group – all in a single processor package.

“Our collaboration with Intel expands the installed base for AMD Radeon GPUs and brings to market a differentiated solution for high-performance graphics,” said Scott Herkelman, vice president and general manager, AMD Radeon Technologies Group. “Together we are offering gamers and content creators the opportunity to have a thinner-and-lighter PC capable of delivering discrete performance-tier graphics experiences in AAA games and content creation applications. This new semi-custom GPU puts the performance and capabilities of Radeon graphics into the hands of an expanded set of enthusiasts who want the best visual experience possible.”

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Intel sees record revenue for data center, IoT and memory

Intel reported Q3 revenue og $16.1 billion and record operating income and record earnings per share (EPS), driven by strong data-centric growth, expanding operating margins and gains on the sale of equity investments. The company cited record revenues for its data center, Internet of Things and memory businesses. Gross margin for Q3 was 62.3%, down from 63.3% a year earlier.

"We executed well in the third quarter with strong results across the business, and we’re on track to a record year,”said Brian Krzanich, Intel CEO. “I’m excited about our progress and our future. Intel’s product line-up is the strongest it has ever been with more innovation on the way for artificial intelligence, autonomous driving and more.”

For its Data Center Group, sales to Cloud/Communication Service Provides now accounts for 60% of revenue, up from 35% in 2013.



Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Intel ships Stratix 10 FPGA with ARM Cortex-A53

Intel has begun shipping a high-end FPGA family with an integrated quad-core ARM Cortex-A53. 

The ARM-based Intel Stratix 10 FPGA, which packs more than 1 million logic elements (MLE) with an integrated ARM processor, could serve multiple application categories, such as 5G wireless communication, software defined radios, secure computing for military applications, network function virtualization (NFV), and data center acceleration.

For NFV, Intel said its new FPGA can handle the high-speed data path while the integrated processors enable low latency transactions needed to manage flow tables for control plane processing. With hardware acceleration, Intel Stratix 10 SX FPGAs provide a heterogeneous computing environment to create optimized, low latency accelerators.

“With Stratix 10 SX, Intel reaffirms its ‘all in’ commitment to SoC FPGA devices combining integrated, flexible ARM cores with high-performance Intel Stratix® 10 FPGAs,” said Reynette Au, vice president of marketing, Intel Programmable Solutions Group. “We now provide a wide set of options for customer needing processors and FPGAs, with device offerings across the low-end, mid-range and now, high-end FPGA families, to enable their system designs.”

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Intel Capital invests $60M in 15 start-ups

Intel Capital announced new investments in 15 start-ups from the United States, Canada, China, Israel and Japan. The investments total more than $60 million. Areas of focus for these ventures include artificial intelligence, cybersecurity and autonomous machines.

Intel noted that this latest group of new portfolio companies brings its year-to-date investing to more than $566 million.


Analyzing Data
Amenity Analytics -- a text analytics platform that allows customers to identify actionable signals from unstructured data. (New York, New York)
Bigstream -- provides hyper-acceleration technology that delivers orders of magnitude performance gains for Apache Spark using hardware and software accelerators.  (Mountain View, California) 
LeapMind -- makes learning with deep neural networks “small and compact” for easy use in any environment.  (Tokyo, Japan) 
Synthego -- is a leading provider of genome engineering solutions. The company’s product portfolio includes software and synthetic RNA kits designed for CRISPR genome editing and research.  (Redwood City, California) 
Capturing Data
AdHawk Microsystems -- developed a camera-free eye tracking system that enables truly mobile data capture and paves the way for a new generation of highly immersive AR/VR experiences.  (Kitchener, Ontario, Canada) 
Trace -- a sports artificial intelligence company working in the domains of soccer, mountain sports and water sports.  (Los Angeles, California)  
Bossa Nova Robotics --  autonomous service robots for the global retail industry (San Francisco, California) 
EchoPixel --  develops 3D medical visualization software (Mountain View, California) 
Managing Data
Horizon Robotics -- provides integrated and open embedded artificial intelligence solutions of high performance, low power and low cost.  (
Reniac -- solves IO bottlenecks resulting in latency reduction and increased throughput for critical workloads in public cloud, hybrid and on-premise data centers without software changes to existing applications. The company’s Distributed Data Engine is architected to benefit databases, file systems, networking and storage solutions while freeing more CPU resources to creating business value.  (Mountain View, California) 
TileDB Inc -- a novel system for managing massive, multidimensional array data that frequently arise from scientific applications.  (Cambridge, Massachusetts) 
Securing Data
Alcide --  a network security platform for any combination of container, VM and bare metal data centers operated by multiple orchestration systems. (Tel Aviv, Israel) 
Eclypsium --  provides technology that helps organizations defend their systems against firmware, hardware and supply chain attacks. The company offers organizations improved visibility for monitoring systems in their infrastructure for firmware threats and supply chain compromise, detection of firmware vulnerabilities, and improved firmware update management in endpoint systems and servers. (Portland, Oregon) 
Intezer  -- develops cybersecurity solutions that apply biological immune system concepts to the cyberspace, creating the world’s first “Code Genome Database,” by mapping billions of small fragments of malicious and trusted software. (Tel Aviv, Israel) 
Synack --  provides customers a scalable, continuous, hacker-powered testing platform that uncovers security vulnerabilities that often remain undetected by traditional penetration testers and scanners.  (Redwood City, California)

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Intel builds 17-qubit superconducting quantum chip

Intel announced a major advance in quantum computing: the delivery of a 17-qubit superconducting test chip for quantum computing to QuTech, Intel’s quantum research partner in the Netherlands.

Intel developed the chip using a mnew architecture allowing improved reliability, thermal performance and reduced radio frequency (RF) interference between qubits.
The design leverages a scalable interconnect scheme that allows for 10 to 100 times more signals into and out of the chip as compared to wirebonded chips.

Intel said the successful fabrication of a quantum computing chip underscores the importance of material science and semiconductor manufacturing in realizing the promise of quantum computing.

“Our quantum research has progressed to the point where our partner QuTech is simulating quantum algorithm workloads, and Intel is fabricating new qubit test chips on a regular basis in our leading-edge manufacturing facilities,” said Dr. Michael Mayberry, corporate vice president and managing director of Intel Labs. “Intel’s expertise in fabrication, control electronics and architecture sets us apart and will serve us well as we venture into new computing paradigms, from neuromorphic to quantum computing.”






Intel joins Open Neural Network Exchange

Intel has joined the Open Neural Network Exchange (ONNX), which was first announced last month by Microsoft and Facebook to give users more choice in AI frameworks.

Currently, the ONNX format is supported by Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit, Caffe2 and PyTorch. Microsoft’s FPGA-based Project Brainwave will also support ONNX.

Intel said it is participating in the project to provide greater flexibility to the developer community by giving access to the most suitable tools for each unique AI project and the ability to easily switch between frameworks and tools.
 center.

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

In Memorium: Paul S. Otellini, 1950 – 2017

Paul Otellini, who served as the fifth CEO of Intel from 2005 to 2012, passed away in his sleep Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, at the age of 66.

Otellini, who joined Intel in 1974 and rose through the ranks, is remembered for many accomplishments at the company. He successfully guided Intel through many technology and market transitions, including the financial turmoil of 2008. Intel noted that in the last full year before Otellini was named CEO, its revenue was $34 billion; by 2012, the number had grown to $53 billion. During his tenure, Intel won the Apple PC business and expanded its presence in security, software and mobile communications. As Intel CEO, Otellini was preceded by Craig Barrett and succeeded by Brian Krzanich.

During his retirement, Otellini was active in several philanthropic and charitable organizations, including the San Francisco Symphony and San Francisco General Hospital Foundation. He is survived by his wife, Sandy; his son, Patrick; and his daughter, Alexis.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Intel Capital's AI Investments top $1 billion

Intel Capital has now invested over $1 billion in companies devoted to the advancement of artificial intelligence.

In a blog post, Intel's CEO Brian Krzanich said the company is fully committed to making its silicon the "platform of choice" for AI developers. Key areas of AI development inside Intel include:

  • Intel Xeon Scalable family of processors for evolving AI workloads. Intel also offers purpose-built silicon for deep learning training, code-named “Lake Crest”
  • Intel Mobileye vision technologies for specialized use cases such as active safety and autonomous driving
  • Intel FPGAs, which can serve as programmable accelerators for deep learning inference
  • Intel Movidius low-power vision technology, which provides machine learning at the edge.



Intel Nervana Aims for AI

Intel introduced its "Nervana" platform and outlined its broad for artificial intelligence (AI), encompassing a range of new products, technologies and investments from the edge to the data center.

Intel currently powers 97 percent of data center servers running AI workloads on its existing Intel Xeon processors and Intel Xeon Phi processors, along with more workload-optimized accelerators, including FPGAs (field-programmable gate arrays).

Intel said the breakthrough technology acquired from Nervana earlier this summer will be integrated into its product roadmap. Intel will test first silicon (code-named “Lake Crest”) in the first half of 2017 and will make it available to key customers later in the year. In addition, Intel announced a new product (code-named “Knights Crest”) on the roadmap that tightly integrates best-in-class Intel Xeon processors with the technology from Nervana. Lake Crest is optimized specifically for neural networks to deliver the highest performance for deep learning and offers unp

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Intel Xeon workstation processors

Intel unveiled its latest Xeon processors for workstations.

Intel said its new Xeon W processor delivers optimized performance for traditional workstation professionals by combining mainstream performance, enhanced memory capabilities, and hardware-enhanced security and reliability features. The Intel Xeon W processor features up to 18 cores and up to 36 threads, with an Intel Turbo Boost Technology frequency up to 4.5 GHz. Mainstream workstations will experience up to a 1.87x boost in performance compared to a 4-year-old system4and up to 1.38x higher performance compared to the previous generation.

This builds on the new family of Intel Xeon Scalable processors, announced in July, that offer up to 56 cores, up to 112 threads and an Intel Turbo Boost Technology frequency up to 4.2 GHz.

https://newsroom.intel.com/news/intel-xeon-scalable-processors-accelerate-creation-innovation-next-generation-workstations/

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Flash Memory Summit – big changes in non-volatile memory - part 2

Over the past year, we’ve seen that HDD capacity increases have plateaued. Spinning disks have been surpassed in storage capacity by SSDs. Performance comparisons between the two is not even a topic of debate. For CIOs, the deployment of flash storage arrays is easy and offers an immediate boost in IOPs for critical applications. More importantly, all the innovation in new drive development has shifted to flash. We are now seeing many approaches being tried in the market to boost SSD performance even further, to scale up to new drive capacities and new array architectures, to adopt new form factors for better rack-scale integration, and increase manufacturing volume to finally meet market demand.

In the first part of this article, we covered Samsung’s rapid progression with 3-D NAND technology. With the arrival of its 5th generation 3D NAND next year we will see 2.5” SSDs soar into the 128TB range. The company says its on-track for 5 more generations of 3-D NAND in the coming decade. In this second part of the article, we’ll look at innovations from another giant, Intel, which has also set its sights on bringing non-volatile memory technologies to the forefront of server, system and data centre design, as well as developments from Nimbus Data and the Gen-Z consortium.

Intel’s non-volatile memory advancements

Intel began shipping its first SSDs as early as 2008 and has been on a continuous improvement path ever since. In 2010, Intel and Micron Technology entered into a partnership focused on NAND flash memory. In 2015, Intel and Micron announced 3D XPoint technology, which was described as the first new memory category since the introduction of NAND flash in 1989, with promises to be up to 1,000 times faster and up to 1,000 times greater endurance than NAND, while being cheaper than DRAM and non-volatile. Intel then adopted the "Optane" brand for products based on thistechnology, while Micron adopted the QuantX brand. Optane is fundamentally different from NAND and uses a combination of unique Intel memory + storage controllers, Intel interconnect IP, and Intel software.

Introducing the memory ruler

Intel's big news at last week's Flash Memory Summit was its new "ruler" form factor for SSD. Instead of the traditional, 2.5" or 3.5" rectangular box for disk drives, Intel's ruler is a long, thin box designed to slide in to a 1" server chassis, plugging in via a PCIe interface at the end of the ruler. It is a slick design. Apart from looking better, the long, thin shape dissipates heat easier. Intel showed a 1” RU server chassis accommodating 32 of these SSD rulers, creating up to 1 petabyte of storage. Intel could offer Optane SSDs and/or 3D NAND SSDs in this form factor.

It’s been a while since a new storage drive format gained widespread acceptance. Intel will need to bring its new form factor to standardization, perhaps via the Open Compute Project, although this was not confirmed. The ruler design should prove to be particularly useful in hyperscale data centres, where plug-n-play convenience is especially useful when 100s of thousands of servers need to be maintained. Intel also noted that its ruler form factor could be used for plug-in accelerators, perhaps FPGA boards optimized for specific functions. No timeline was given for when the ruler might enter the market.

Intel and Attala Systems also announced an FPGA-based accelerated RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE) networking solution designed to serve as high-performance, composable storage infrastructure with features such as self-learning orchestration and provisioning capabilities. The idea is to create an adaptable storage infrastructure that is essentially an elastic block storage (EBS) solution, accelerated. Attala Systems is a start-up based in San Jose, California that was founded by Sujith Arramreddy, who previously co-founded ServerEngines (acquired by Emulex for $250 million in 2010) and ServerWorks (acquired by Broadcom for $1.4 billion in 2001). Attala's CEO is Taufik Ma, who previously was co-GM of Intel's Server System business unit before leaving for a storage/networking start-up. Nimbus Data sees 500 TB SSDs by 2020

Nimbus Data is a privately-held develop of all-flash arrays based in Irvine, California. The company observes that 40 million nearline/high-capacity HDDs are shipped per year, and all of them use the 3.5” form factor. At Flash Memory Summit, Nimbus Data introduced a software and multiprocessor solution for OEMs developing next-generation solid state drives for data centres. Whereas conventional SSDs are based on a single flash controller, Nimbus ExaDrive is based on a distributed multiprocessor architecture. Inside an ExaDrive-powered SSD, multiple ultra-low power ASICs exclusively handle error correction, while an intelligent flash processor provides wear-leveling and capacity management in software. Nimbus sees an opportunity for its ExaDrive being used in super capacity SSDs that let data centers rip-andreplace HDDs with flash. ExaDrive supports the standard SAS interface and is optimized to fully utilize the volume of the 3.5” form factor.

Nimbus said its ExaDrive is used by Viking Technology and SMART Modular Technologies in 50 TB and 25 TB SSDs for cloud infrastructure, technical computing, and digital content storage. The company predicts that its ExaDrive software-defined architecture will enable SSDs as large as 500 TB by the year 2020, achieving up to 600 petabytes in a single rack. This represents a 50x increase over what is possible with HDDs today. “ExaDrive’s software-defined multiprocessor architecture for SSDs delivers a game-changing leap forward in capacity, density, and energy efficiency that HDDs will never be able to recoup,” stated Thomas Isakovich, CEO and Founder of Nimbus Data. “ExaDrive broadens the appeal of flash memory to tier 2 and nearline use cases, enabling flash to become the dominant data center storage media.”

Gen-Z consortium targets data centres

The Gen-Z Consortium is a vendor-led group that is developing an open systems interconnect with memory semantic access to data and devices via direct-attached, switched or fabric topologies. Its major members include AMD, ARM, Broadcom, Cray, Dell EMC, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Huawei, IDT, Micron, Samsung, SK hynix, and Xilinx. At this year’s Flash Memory Summit, the group had planned it’s the Gen-Z multi-vendor technology demonstration, connecting compute, memory, and I/O devices. Despite the unfortunate fire at a vendor booth on the opening day of the event, the demo was still able to occur in a nearby meeting room.

The demo showed FPGA-based Gen-Z adapters connecting compute nodes to memory pools through a Gen-Z switch, creating a fabric connecting multiple server vendors and a variety of memory vendors. Such a highperformance and scalable fabric/interconnect could be implemented in future data centres. The demo also featured a scalable prototype connector defined by the Gen-Z Consortium, running at 112 giga-transfers/sec. “We are excited to showcase the first technology demonstration of Gen-Z that includes solutions from multiple member companies, including a variety of servers, memory and I/O devices, all connected with a Gen-Z fabric,” said Kurtis Bowman, President of the Gen-Z Consortium. “The consortium continues to meet the planned development schedule and we expect to see initial Gen-Z products in the 2019-2020 timeframe.”

http://genzconsortium.org/

Monday, August 21, 2017

Intel Launches 8th gen Core processors

Intel officially introduced its 8th Gen Intel Core processors, including a range of mobile processors designed specifically for sleek thin and light notebooks and 2 in 1s.

The new mobile processors promises a boost of up to 40 percent gen over gen1 devices or 2x the performance if you compare it with a 5-year-old machine. The processors feature a new quad-core configuration, power-efficient microarchitecture, advanced process technology and a huge range of silicon optimizations.

  • Intel UHD Graphics are integrated into these next-generation processors. A media engine, with power-efficient VP9 and HEVC 10-bit hardware acceleration, means great battery life, even with 4K UHD viewing andcontent creation. 
  • I/O in 8th generation Intel Core Processor U-series includes PCIe 3.0, delivering data transfer rates at 8 GT/s versus 5
  • GT/s with PCIe 2.0. 
  • The latest Intel Rapid Storage Technology supports NVMe PCIe x4 Solid State Drives, and it is capable of utilizing PCIe 3.0 speed. 
  • Thunderbolt 3 technology (USB-C) supports up to 40 Gbps transfer speeds, two 4K 60 Hz displays, system charging up to 100W, external graphics, and Thunderbolt networking.

The first wave of 8th Gen Intel Core processor-powered devices featuring i5/i7 processors will come to market beginning in September.

http://www.intel.com


See also