Monday, February 8, 2016

NTT Develops Flexible Access System Architecture with Virtualized OLTs

NTT is developing a new Flexible Access System Architecture (FASA) that aims to leverage a new generation of virtualized optical line terminals (OLTs).

NTT said FASA will not make use of conventional purpose-built equipment, but instead modularize the various individual functions of access equipment as much as possible. The idea is to use generic OLT hardware that allows modularized software components to run for specific functions, such as bandwidth control, OAM, multicast, and future services.  NTT is developing an API with multiple industry partners. The first API is schedule for release in May 2016.

With FASA, the components of access equipment are separated into the three types: 1) Software components, 2) Generic hardware, and 3) External modules. FASA enables access equipment to provide its necessary functions through the unrestricted combination of these three component types. With software components (1), it will become possible to add new functions quickly and flexibly just by adding or updating necessary software in response to the requirements of services. For the generic functions of access equipment, generic hardware (2) will make it less frequently necessary to newly develop equipment from the device level by striving to achieve a set of common generic components. The creation of such components can also be expected to lower equipment costs and make maintenance simpler by reducing the number of component types that need maintenance. For functions like optical transmission that are difficult to address with either software components or generic hardware, things like optimal transmission capacities can be achieved through the use of external modules (3) that can be substituted for dedicated hardware in response to the requirements of services.

NTT is also working on a a visualized testing environment.  Its NetroSphere concept will undertake testing of FASA and other key technologies, such as Multi-Service Fabric (MSF), new server architecture (MAGONIA), and Integrated Management.

http://www.ntt.co.jp/news2016/1602e/160208a.html

NTT's NetroSphere Concept Pushes NFV to Next Level

NTT outlined its work developing the “NetroSphere concept” -- a new way build carrier network infrastructure that differs from other NFV approaches by taking the decoupled software/hardware paradigm all the way down to the component level.

NTT said its approach promises enhanced flexibility and elasticity while also drastically reducing costs. Breaking up the functions of conventional large-scale equipment into modules will enable a greater diversity of suppliers to participate in the market and hence widen the selection of available products.

Instead of using conventional purpose-built high-functionality equipment, NetroSphere aims to divide them into small modular components, and flexibly assemble those components at will.  NetroSphere will not limited to decoupling software components from equipment. It pursues modularization as much as possible, ultimately at the sub-device level such as the CPU and memory. These modules will be distributed in locations that are optimal for each type of them, and prepared to be used as resource pool. Then, they will be virtually assembled to form a virtual system to provide required functions.

There are two components to the NetroSpher concept:  (1) Multi-Service Fabric (MSF), an architectural design of carrier network in which functions are achieved using simple general-purpose servers and switches, and (2) New Server Architecture (MAGONIA).

NTT plans to open its work on “MAGONIA” and “Multi-Service Fabric (MSF)” to other carriers and vendors.

http://www.ntt.co.jp/news2015/1502e/150219a.html

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