Thursday, September 26, 2013

NSN Sees 5G Viability in Authorized Shared Access (ASA) with TD-LTE Spectrum

Nokia Solutions and Networks demonstrated the viability of Authorized Shared Access (ASA) -- a new technology that enables dynamic access to underutilized spectrum frequencies.

NSN describes ASA and spectrum sharing as enabling technology for 5G. The idea is for mobile operators to share frequency bands from other types of incumbent systems, such as government agencies or TV broadcast networks, while guaranteeing quality of service for both.

Earlier this year, NSN and CORE+ consortium took a giant leap forward with the worlds’ first spectrum sharing trial of ASA on a live 2.3GHz TD-LTE network. For the live trial, NSN deployed its network elements in three Finnish cities: commercial Single RAN Flexi MultiRadio 10 Base Stations in Ylivieska, commercial Core Network in Oulu and commercial NetAct network management system in Tampere.

“The benefit of ASA is that it provides both the technology and regulatory framework for sharing spectrum”, said Marc Rouanne, executive vice president, Mobile Broadband at NSN. “Our trial showed that operators can get up to 18% extra bandwidth for mobile broadband networks cost effectively. This technology works with existing LTE and TD-LTE networks and does not require specific software for the end-user devices, making it easy to deploy and transfer the benefit directly to the mobile customers.”

http://blogs.nsn.com/mobile-networks/2013/05/30/nokia-siemens-networks-accelerates-worlds-first-td-lte-spectrum-sharing-trial-of-asa/

Presentation here:
http://core.willab.fi/?q=node/69


In June 2013, a U.S. Spectrum Policy Team was formed to accelerate spectrum sharing policies and technologies. The Spectrum Policy Team will draft recommendations on how NTIA and FCC can incorporate spectrum sharing into their spectrum management practices to enable more productive uses of spectrum throughout our economy and society and protect the current and future mission capabilities of federal agencies. The team consists of the Chief Technology Officer and the Director of the National Economic Council, along with representatives from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the National Security Staff, and the Council of Economic Advisers.


In July 2012, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) issued a report identifying 1,000 MHz of federal spectrum for sharing with the private sector.

U.S. federal policy should shift in favor "Shared-Use Spectrum Superhighways" instead the current plan which is to first clear federal users from specific bands and then auction this spectrum for the exclusive use of the highest bidder, according to a new report issued by 

A Presidential memorandum issued in June 2010 requires that 500 MHz of spectrum to be made available for commercial use within 10 years.  However, a recent NTIA Study found that clearing just one 95 MHz band will take 10 years, cost $18 billion, and cause significant disruption. Moreover, the net revenue for the Treasury from the last successful auction of 45 MHz realized a net income of just a few hundred million a year ($5.3 billion total).

The PCAST report said its vision of shared spectrum is viable using existing technologies and is not dependent on cognitive or "smart" radios. Instead, a geo-location database could be used the share spectrum much like how the FCC is using managing TV bands. The TV Whitespaces system could be used as a model. Technical standards would need to be implemented for coexistence of transmitters and receivers to enable flexible sharing.

0 comments:

Post a Comment

See also